NEW$ & VIEW$ (3 JANUARY 2014)

Global Manufacturing Improves At Fastest Pace Since February 2011

The end of 2013 saw growth of the global manufacturing sector accelerate to a 32-month high. The J.P.Morgan Global Manufacturing PMI™ – a composite index produced by JPMorgan and Markit in association with ISM and IFPSM – rose to 53.3 in December, up from 53.1 in November, to signal expansion for the twelfth month in a row.

imageThe average reading of the headline PMI through 2013 as a whole (51.5) was better than the stagnation signalled over 2012 (PMI: 50.0). The rate
of expansion registered for the final quarter of 2013 was the best since Q2 2011.

Global manufacturing production expanded for the fourteenth straight month in December. Moreover, the pace of increase was the fastest since February 2011, as the growth rate of new orders held broadly steady at November’s 33-month record. New export orders rose for the sixth month running.

Output growth was again led by the G7 developed nations in December, as robust expansions in the US, Japan, Germany, the UK (which registered the highest Output PMI reading of all countries) and Italy
offset the ongoing contraction in France and a sharp growth slowdown in Canada.

Among the larger emerging nations covered by the survey, already muted rates of increase for production eased in China, India and Russia, and remained similarly modest in Brazil and South Korea despite slight  accelerations. Taiwan was a brighter spot, with output growth hitting a 32-month high.

December PMI data signalled an increase in global manufacturing employment for the sixth consecutive month. Although the rate of jobs growth was again only moderate, it was nonetheless the fastest for
almost two-and-a-half years. Payroll numbers were raised in the majority of the nations covered, including the US, Japan, Germany,
the UK, India, Taiwan and South Korea. Job losses were recorded in China, France, Spain, Brazil, Russia, Austria and Greece.

Input price inflation accelerated to a 20-month peak in December, and was slightly above the survey average. Part of the increase in costs was passed on to clients, reflected in the pace of output price inflation reaching a near two-and-a-half year peak.

U.S. Construction Spending Advances Further

The value of construction put-in-place gained 1.0% in November (5.9% y/y) following a little-revised 0.9% October rise. The September increase of 1.4% was revised up substantially from the initially-estimated 0.3% slip.

Private sector construction activity jumped 2.2% (8.6% y/y) in November after no change in October. Residential building surged 1.9% (16.6% y/y) as spending on improvements recovered 2.2% (10.2% y/y). Single-family home building activity gained 1.8% (18.4% y/y) while multi-family building rose 0.9%, up by more than one-third y/y. Nonresidential building activity surged 2.7% (1.0% y/y) paced by an 8.8% gain (37.7% y/y) in multi-retail and a 4.6% rise (11.5% y/y) in office building.

Offsetting these November gains was a 1.8% decline (-0.2% y/y) in the value of public sector building activity. (…)

Surprised smile Euro-Zone Private Lending Plunges

Lending to the private sector in the euro zone plunged in November at the sharpest annual rate since records began over 20 years ago, data from the European Central Bank showed Friday, suggesting that the region will struggle to get its anticipated economic recovery in full gear.

Private sector lending in the euro zone declined by 2.3% on the year, after a 2.2% decline in October, the ECB said. (…)

On the month, lending to households declined by 3 billion euros ($4.1 billion) reversing the €3 billion increase in October, while lending to firms fell by €13 billion, following a €15 billion drop in the previous month. Loans to firms were down by 3.9% on the year. (…)

The ECB’s broad gauge of money supply, or M3, grew by only 1.5% in November in annual terms, above the 1.4% rise in October, while the three-month average grew by 1.7%, after 1.9% in the previous month. The monetary growth data remain well below the ECB’s “reference value” of 4.5%, which it considers consistent with its price stability mandate.

Auto Decline in German car sales accelerated in 2013: KBA

The decline in German car sales accelerated last year, falling below 3 million vehicles for the first time since 2010, reflecting troubles in Europe that have sent auto demand close to a two-decade low.

New car registrations in Germany fell 4.2 percent to 2.95 million last year, the German Federal Motor Transport Authority (KBA) said, after a decline of 2.9 percent in 2012.

Germany’s premium carmakers BMW (BMWG.DE), Mercedes-Benz (DAIGn.DE) and Audi (NSUG.DE) each lost market share, suffering sales declines of 5.8 percent, 1.4 percent and 5.5 percent respectively. (…)

German mass market brand Opel, owned by General Motors (GM.N), lost 2.9 percent market share last year while Volkswagen (VOWG_p.DE) sales fell by 4.6 percent in its home market. (…)

Imported volume brands fared worse than their German rivals, with Citroen (PEUP.PA) registrations down 20.6 percent, Chevrolet dropping 17.7 percent and Peugeot down 23.4 percent.

The gainers were South Korean value brands such as Hyundai (005380.KS), which achieved a 0.7 percent increase, and Kia (000270.KS), which boosted sales by 1.6 percent. (…)

Fingers crossed The blow of the overall annual decline was softened by December’s sales figures, with registrations up 5.4 percent on the same month last year, in line with a trend seen in other European countries.

EARNINGS WATCH

 

The Morning Ledger: Rising Rates Buoy Pension Plans

Pension-funding levels surged last year and we could see more gains in 2014. Towers Watson estimates levels last year rose by 16 percentage points to an aggregate 93% for 418 Fortune 1000 companies. That’s still below the 106% reached in 2007, but companies could see triple digits this year if long-term interest rates continue to rise and the stock market remains strong, Alan Glickstein, senior retirement consultant for Towers Watson, tells CFOJ’s Vipal Monga. (…)

Towers Watson said that the discount rate rose to an estimated 4.8% in 2013 from 3.96% in 2012. Meanwhile, the S&P 500 index rose 26% last year, the biggest gain since 1997, which boosted the asset values of the pension funds and helped to further shrink the funding gap. Towers Watson said that pension-plan assets rose an estimated 9% in 2013 to $1.41 trillion, from $1.29 trillion at the end of 2012, while companies cut the amount they contributed to the plans last year by 23% to $48.8 billion.

Heard on the Street’s David Reilly says that the discount rate should keep rising in 2014, even if not briskly as last year. The U.S. economic recovery is gaining strength, and the Fed is tapering its bond purchases. Higher rates should chip away at pensions’ overall liabilities.  “Improvement on both the asset and liability fronts means many companies may be able to begin lowering their pension expense, supporting earnings,” Reilly writes.

Pointing up The report noted that the higher funding levels caused many companies to reduce the amounts they contributed to the plans last year to $48.8 billion. That was 23% less than in 2012.

For example, Ford Motor Co. said in December that the improved environment could help the automaker halve its expected pension contributions to an average annual range between $1 billion to $2 billion over the next three years. That’s down from an earlier outlook of $2 billion to $3 billion.

SENTIMENT WATCH

We are seeing more and more of these thesis “explaining” that markets are expensive but they can carry on. For almost 5 years, most of the “bull” was produced by the bears. Funny how things just never change Crying face. This FT piece tells us all the “uneasy truths”. Well, some of it is not really truth, which is perhaps what makes it uneasy. Sounds like capitulation is very near.

Running with the bulls
Uneasy truths about the US market rally

US stocks may be overpriced and profit margins at a high but even bears say the rally has room to run

(…) Why is there such belief in a long-lived bull market? First, bond yields remain historically low, with 10-year Treasury bills yielding barely 3 per cent. When yields are low it is justifiable to pay a higher multiple for stocks because cheaper credit makes it easier for companies to make profits. Paying more for stocks also seems more palatable when bond yields are low.

Further, there is no evidence that investors are growing overexcited, as they usually do towards the end of a bubble. The American Association of Individual Investors’ weekly poll of its members has long been a reliable contrarian indicator. When large numbers say they are bullish it is generally a good time to sell. When the majority are bearish (the record for this indicator came in the second week of March 2009 when despair was total and the current bull market began) it is a good time to buy. Today, 47 per cent consider themselves bulls and 25 per cent bears, numbers a long way from an extreme of optimism.

However, stocks are unquestionably overpriced. Robert Shiller’s cyclically adjusted price/earnings multiple (Cape), long regarded as a reliable indicator of long-term value, is now at a level at which the market peaked before bear markets several times in the past. However, it remains below the levels it reached during true “bubbles” such as the dotcom mania. The same is true of “Tobin’s q”, which compares share prices with the total replacement value of corporate assets.

Further, profit margins are at a historic high and over time have shown a strong tendency to revert to the historic mean. The combination of high valuations being put on profits benefiting from cyclically high margins suggests markets are overvalued.

Why, then, are brokers calling for rising prices in 2014 or even a melt-up?

First, markets have their own momentum. On all previous occasions when earnings multiples have expanded this far this quickly, research by Morgan Stanley’s Adam Parker shows that they have carried on expanding for at least another year. And while the extent of US stocks’ rise since March 2009 is impressive, the duration of this rally is not unusual. Typically, bull markets carry on for longer. Also, this market has low levels of volatility and has not had a correction in a while. The approaching end of a bull market is generally marked by corrections and rising volatility.

Another reason to believe the bull market could eventually become a bubble lies in the record amounts of cash resting in money market funds, even though these funds pay negligible interest. The bull run is unlikely to peak until some of this money has found its way into stocks.

Finally, and most importantly, there is the role of monetary policy. The Federal Reserve’s programme of “quantitative easing” , in which it has bought mortgage-backed and government bonds in an attempt to force up asset values and push down yields, has had a huge impact on market sentiment.

Although the Fed said in December it would start tapering off its monthly bond purchases, it also says interest rates will stay at virtually zero until well into 2015. The S&P hit a record after the taper announcement. (…)

How can a “melt-up” be averted? Mr Parker of Morgan Stanley suggests that a significant correction would require fear that earnings will come in well below current projections – so the season when companies announce their earnings for the full year, which starts late in January, could be important. But with the US economy exceeding recent forecasts for growth, a serious earnings disappointment seems unlikely without a catalyst from outside the US – such as a big slowdown in China or a renewed crisis in Europe.

Failing these things, it could be left to the Fed itself to do the job by raising rates or removing stimulus faster than the market had expected.

Chris Watling of Longview Economics in London says US equity valuations are undoubtedly “full” – but are no more expensive than when Alan Greenspan, then Fed chairman, tried to talk down the stock market by warning of “irrational exuberance” in December 1996. On that occasion the bull market carried on for three more years and turned into an epic bubble before finally going into reverse.

“They’ll become more expensive,” says Mr Watling. “It’s not until we see tight money that we talk about the end of this valuation uplift in the US.”

This last comment comes from a fellow working at Longview Economics…Winking smile

Ritholtz Chart: Why ‘Wildly Overvalued’ Stocks May Keep Rising

(…) somewhat overvalued U.S. equity prices can continue to rise if price/earning multiples keep expanding.

Further P/E inflation is what BCA (Bank Credit Analyst) is expecting. They point out “a clear link between equity multiples and the yield curve [with] a steeper yield curve indicative of better growth and very easy monetary policy. As such, it often coexists with expanding equity  multiples.”

If we are entering a rising rate environment, a steeper yield curve is a likely stay. BCA notes that “the long end of the curve will be held high by real economic growth and better profitability, while the short end of the curve will be suppressed by the Fed.”

image
 
High five Return of inflation is inevitable
Fund manager Michael Aronstein bets on the lessons of history

Markets are underestimating a coming rout in bond prices, and missing early signs of the return of inflation, according to the US mutual fund manager who has raised more money than any other in the past year. (…)

He and his team pore over price data from hundreds upon hundreds of commodities and manufactured goods, and he highlights proteins – shrimp, beef, chicken – and US lumber among the areas where price spikes are already developing. It is outwards from these pressure points, he says, that the world will finally move from asset price inflation to real consumer price rises.

And as that happens, bonds will tumble and investors will reassess the safety of emerging markets that till now have been fuelled by unprecedentedly cheap money. There are profits to be made buying the companies with pricing power and betting against those without, he says, and from concentrating investment in developed economies and staying cautious beyond.

Party smile Hey! Who invited this Aronstein guy to the party?

OIL AND SHALE OIL

TheTradersWire.com posted this from hedge fund manager Andy Hall earlier this week with the following intro:

Phibro’s (currently Astenback Capital Management) Andy Hall knows a thing or two about the oil market – and even if he doesn’t (and it was all luck), his views are sufficiently respected to influence the industrial groupthink. Which is why for anyone interested in where one of the foremost oil market movers sees oil supply over the next decade, here are his full thoughts from his latest letter to Astenback investors. Of particular note: Hall’s warning to all the shale oil optimists: “According to the DOE data, for Bakken and Eagle Ford the legacy well decline rate has been running at either side of 6.5 per cent per month… Production from new wells has been running at about 90,000 bpd per month per field meaning net growth in production is 25,000 bpd per month. It will become smaller as output grows and that’s why ceteris paribus growth in output for both fields will continue to slow over the coming years. When all the easily drillable sites are exhausted – at the latest sometime shortly after 2020 – production from these two fields will decline.”

Here’s Hall’s very interesting note but FYI, Reuters’ had this piece on Dec. 6: Andy Hall’s fund losses deepen after wrong bet on U.S.-Brent crude

From Astenback Capital Management

The speed with which an interim agreement was reached with Iran was unexpected. Equally unexpected was the immediate relaxation of sanctions relating to access to banking and insurance coverage. This will potentially result in an increase in Iranian exports of perhaps 400,000 bpd. Beyond that it is hard to predict what might happen. The next set of negotiations will certainly be much more difficult. The fundamental differences of view that were papered over in the recent talks need to be fully resolved and that will be extremely difficult to do. Also, Iran’s physical capacity to export much more additional oil is in doubt because its aging oil fields have been starved of investment.

As to Libya, it seems unlikely that things will get better there anytime soon. The unrest and political discontent seems to be worsening. Whilst some oil exports are likely to resume – particularly from the western part of the country (Tripolitania), overall levels of oil exports from Libya in 2014 will be well below those of 2013.

Iraqi exports should rise by about 300,000 bpd in 2014 as new export facilities come into operation. But there is a meaningful risk of interruptions due to the sectarian strife in Iraq that increasingly borders on civil war. Saudi Arabia’s displeasure at the West’s quasi rapprochement with Iran is likely to add fuel to the fire in the Sunni-Shia fight for supremacy throughout the region.

If gains in 2014 of exports from Iran are assumed to offset losses from Libya, potential net additional exports from OPEC would amount to whatever increment materializes from Iraq. Saudi Arabia has been pumping oil at close to its practical (if not hypothetical) maximum capacity of 10.5 million bpd for much of 2013. It could therefore easily accommodate any additional output from Iraq in order to maintain a Brent price of $ 100 – assuming it wants to do so and that it becomes necessary to do so. Still, $ 100 is meaningfully lower than $ 110+ which is where the benchmark grade has on average been trading for the past three years.

So much for OPEC, what about non-OPEC supply? Most forecasters predict this to grow by about 1.4 million bpd with the largest contribution – about 1.1 million bpd – coming from the U.S. and Canada and the balance primarily from Brazil and Kazakhstan. Brazil’s oil production has been forecast to grow every year for the past four or five years and each time it has disappointed. Indeed Petrobras has struggled to prevent output declining. Perhaps 2014 is the year they finally turn things around but also, perhaps not. The Kashagan field in Kazakhstan briefly came on stream last September – almost a decade behind schedule. It was shut down again almost immediately because of technical problems. The assumption is that the consortium of companies operating the field will finally achieve full production in 2014.

Canada’s contribution to supply growth is perhaps the most predictable as it comes from additions to tar sands capacity whose technology is tried and tested. Provided planned production additions come on stream according to schedule in 2014, these should amount to about 200,000 bpd.

Most forecasters expect the U.S. to add 900,000 bpd to oil supplies in 2014, largely driven by the continuing boom in shale oil. That would be lower than the increment seen this year or in 2012 but market sentiment seems to be discounting a surprise to the upside. As mentioned above, many companies have been creating a stir with talk of exciting new prospects beyond Bakken and Eagle Ford which so far have accounted for nearly all the growth in shale oil production. Indeed at first blush there seem to be so many potential prospects it is hard to keep track of them all. Even within the Bakken and Eagle Ford, talk of down-spacing, faster well completions through pad drilling and “super wells” with very high initial rates of production resulting from the use of new completion techniques have created an impression of a cornucopia of unending growth and that impression weighs on forward WTI prices.

But part of what is going on here is the industry’s desire to maintain a level of buzz consistent with rising equity valuations and capital inflows to the sector.

The hot play now is one of the oldest in America; the Permian basin. A handful of companies with large acreage in the region are making very optimistic assessments of their prospects there. These are based on making long term projections based on a few months’ production data from a handful of wells. We wonder whether data gets cherry picked for investor presentations. We hear about the great wells but not about the disappointing ones. Furthermore, many companies are pointing to higher initial rates of production without taking into account the higher depletion rates which go hand in hand with these higher start-up rates. EOG, the biggest and the best of the shale oil players recently asserted that the Permian – a play in which it is actively investing – will be much more difficult to develop than were either the Bakken or Eagle Ford. EOG figures horizontal oil wells in the Permian have productivity little more than a third of those in Eagle Ford. EOG has further stated on various occasions that the rapid growth in shale oil production is already behind us.

In part this is simple math. The DOE recently started publishing short term production forecasts for each of the major shale plays. They project monthly production increments based on rig counts and observed rig productivity (new wells per rig per month multiplied by production per rig) and subtracting from it the decline in production from legacy wells. According to the DOE data, for Bakken and Eagle Ford the legacy well decline rate has been running at either side of 6.5 per cent per month. When these fields were each producing 500,000 bpd that legacy decline therefore amounted to 33,000 bpd per month per field. With both fields now producing 1 million bpd the legacy decline is 65,000 bpd per month. Production from new wells has been running at about 90,000 bpd per month per field meaning net growth in production is 25,000 bpd per month. It will become smaller as output grows and that’s why ceteris paribus growth in output for both fields will continue to slow over the coming years. When all the easily drillable sites are exhausted – at the latest sometime shortly after 2020 – production from these two fields will decline.

Others have made the same analysis. A couple of weeks ago the IEA expressed concern that shale oil euphoria was discouraging investment in longer term projects elsewhere in the world that will be needed to sustain supply when U.S. shale oil production starts to decline.

Decelerating shale oil production growth is also reflected in the forecasts of independent analysts ITG. They have undertaken the most thorough analysis of U.S. shale plays and use a rigorous and granular approach in forecasting future shale and non-shale oil production in the U.S. Of course their forecast like any other is dependent on the underlying assumptions. But ITG can hardly be branded shale oil skeptics – to the contrary. Yet their forecast for U.S. production growth also calls for a dramatic slowing in the rate of growth. Their most recent forecast is for U.S. production excluding Alaska to grow by about 700,000 bpd in 2014. With Alaskan production continuing to decline, that implies growth of under 700,000 bpd in overall U.S. oil production, or 200,000 bpd less than consensus.

The final element of supply is represented by the change in inventory levels. The major OECD countries will end 2013 with oil inventories some 100 million barrels lower than they were at the beginning of the year. That stock drawdown is equivalent to nearly 300,000 bpd of supply that will not be available in 2014. Data outside the OECD countries is notoriously sparse but the evidence strongly suggests there was also massive destocking in China during 2013.

U.S. Warns on Bakken Shale Oil

The federal government issued a rare safety alert on Thursday, warning that crude oil from the Bakken Shale in North Dakota may be more flammable than other types of crude.

The warning comes after two federal agencies spent months inspecting Bakken crude, including oil carried in recent train accidents that resulted in explosions. The latest blast occurred earlier this week in Casselton, N.D., 25 miles west of Fargo. (…)

North Dakota statistics shows about three-quarters of Bakken crude produced in the state is shipped out by rail.

Manhattan apartment sales hit record high
Figures boosted as overseas buyers compete with New Yorkers

(…) The number of purchases rose 27 per cent compared with the same period the year before to 3,297, according to new data released on Friday. Although down from 3,837 in the third quarter, this was the highest fourth-quarter tally since records began 25 years ago, according to appraiser Miller Samuel and brokerage Douglas Elliman Real Estate.

Limited supply has led to buyers often making immediate all-cash offers, participating in bidding wars and making decisions based on floor plans alone, in an echo of the previous property boom. The number of days a property was on the market in the fourth quarter almost halved from the previous year to 95 days.

“Demand from foreign buyers has never been stronger. Those from the Middle East, Russia, South America, China have been on an incredible buying spree and it is these sales that are driving prices,” said Pamela Liebman, chief executive of property broker The Corcoran Group.

The median price of a luxury apartment – usually above $3m – jumped 10 per cent from a year ago to $4.9m. (…)

The pool of homes for sale is shrinking as many owners wait for prices to rise further before they list. The number of homes on the market at the end of December fell 12.3 per cent from a year earlier to 4,164, near all-time lows.

And new supply is limited – developers hit by the financial crisis have only recently revived projects, which are often luxury residences sought by deep-pocketed local and foreign buyers.

The overall median sales price in the fourth quarter rose 2.1 per cent from the previous year to $855,000. The increase was led by condominiums – largely accounting for the new developments that are the preferred choice of international buyers – which had a record median price of $1.3m.

MILLENNIALS SHUN CREDIT

(…) the 80 million Americans between the ages of 18 and 30 spend around $600 billion annually, but the proportion of that cohort that doesn’t even own a credit card rose from 9 percent in 2005 to 16 percent in 2012. According to credit-reporting firm Experian, Millennials own an average of 1.6 credit cards, while the 30- to 46-year-olds of Generation X own 2.1, and Baby Boomers 2.7. And they don’t even overload those cards they do carry: the average card balance for 19- to 29-year-olds is $2,682, around half that of older age groups. (…)

Most consumers dialed back on credit during the recession. But consumer credit has been rebounding since—except among Millennials. Student loans are one reason for that divergence. In the past 20 years, the cost of tuition and room and board at both private and public colleges has skyrocketed (60 percent and 83 percent, respectively) to $40,917 and $18,391, according to the College Board.  Outstanding student loan balances were more than $1 trillion in September—up 327 percent in just a single decade–according to the New York Federal Reserve Board. The result: Education loans now account for the second largest chunk of outstanding consumer debt after mortgages. Students who graduated from private colleges in 2012 carried $29,900 in debt, up 24 percent in ten years, and public school graduates weren’t far behind, with $25,000 (up 22 percent). With that kind of luggage to carry around, it’s understandable that young people aren’t crazy about adding to their burdens.

There’s also the fact that it’s simply more difficult for young people to get credit cards than it used to be.  (…) (Credit Suisse)

 

NEW$ & VIEW$ (2 JANUARY 2014)

U.S. Home Prices Continued to Rise in October Housing prices remained on an upward trend in October, but growth may not be as strong in 2014, according to S&P/Case-Shiller.

The home price index covering 10 major U.S. cities increased 13.6% in the year ended in October, according to the S&P/Case-Shiller home price report. The 20-city price index also increased 13.6%, close to the 13.7% advance expected by economists.

Both increases are the highest since February 2006, the report said. (…)

“Monthly numbers show we are living on borrowed time and the boom is fading,” said David Blitzer, chairman of the index committee at S&P Dow Jones Indices.

Both the 10-city and 20-city indexes increased 0.2% in October from September on an unadjusted basis, slower than the 0.7% increase in the previous month.

The seasonally adjusted gain for both composites was 1.0% in October from September, in line with the gains seen in the previous month.

Auto French Car Sales Rose 9.4% in December

French car sales rose 9.4% in December following a 5.7% increase in November, underlining a return to health after the market’s protracted slide to its lowest level in two decades.

French car sales rose 9.4% in December following a 5.7% increase in November, underlining a return to health after the market’s protracted slide to its lowest level in two decades, according to registrations data released Thursday by the French car manufacturers’ association.

French manufacturers Renault and PSA Peugeot-Citroën managed to regain market share from foreign brands, together accounting for 50.6% of the overall market in December, compared with 45.4% a year earlier. Sales in the latter part of last year were given a slight lift by the approach of an increase in value-added tax that became effective Jan. 1, prompting buyers to place orders before the deadline.

Over the full year, car sales in France were down 5.7% compared with 2012, reflecting gloomy consumer sentiment amid a tougher government fiscal policy and worries over unemployment.

SENTIMENT WATCH
 
2014 outlook: Sugar high. ‘Credit Cassandras’ say demand for risky bonds is a sign of frothy markets

(…) To the sceptics, the market is experiencing the kind of frothiness seen before the 2008 financial crisis. This, too, will end in tears, they warn. (…)

Issuance of syndicated leveraged loans – those made to companies that already carry high debt loads – reached $535.2bn in 2013. That is just shy of the $604.2bn sold in 2007, at the height of the last credit bubble. Meanwhile, loans that come with fewer protections for lenders, known as “covenant-lite”, accounted for almost 60 per cent of loans sold in 2013, compared with a 25 per cent share in 2007.

Sales of “payment-in-kind” notes, which give borrowers an option to repay lenders with more debt reached $11.5bn in 2012 – a post-crisis high. (…)

Sales of “junk”, or high-yield, bonds surged to a record in 2013 as companies rushed to refinance and investors snapped up the resulting assets. Issuance of junk bonds rated “triple C” – the lowest designation – jumped to $15.3bn, surpassing the pre-crisis peak. (…)

Others cite reasons for optimism. They note that credit “spreads”, or the additional returns investors demand to hold riskier credit assets, are not yet near the historic lows experienced in the run-up to the 2008 crisis. That suggests investors are differentiating between riskier assets and relatively safe securities, such as US government debt.

In contrast to 2007, the current average junk bond yield of 5.6 per cent is far higher than the yield on offer from the five-year Treasury note, at a difference of about 423 basis points. In June 2007, this spread had narrowed to a record low of 238 bps.

The argument against a bubble forming in the market at the moment is that overall credit remains abundant, enabling companies to roll over their funding, notes Mr Koesterich. “Companies can still raise money, so there is no financing risk.”

But investors who are concerned about the warning signs simmering in the credit markets may not be able to avoid investing in risky asset classes. For many, the pressure of reaching their “bogeys” – the benchmarks used to evaluate returns – is enough to justify the acquisition of riskier credit assets, particularly given the lack of yield on safer investments. (…)

Despite continued strong sales of corporate and government bonds, the central banks’ big purchases mean annual net issuance of financial assets is hovering around $1tn – far lower than the $3tn-$4tn sold in the years before the crisis, according to data compiled by Citigroup.

Pointing up “We are removing a significant number of high-quality bonds from the system and that requires replacement, and that replacement can only be found at a higher spread and that requires higher risk,” says Jason Shoup, a Citi analyst.

Wall Street’s securitisation machine is shifting into gear to help make up for some of the lack of supply. The kind of subprime mortgage-backed securities that played a starring role in the mid-2000s housing boom have largely disappeared. But other “sliced and diced” securities have come back. (…)

De Blasio sets liberal agenda for New York
Mayor warns that city faces crisis of inequality

(…) Mr de Blasio, an underdog when he began his quest to become mayor, was voted in on a promise to pursue more progressive policies such as universal pre-kindergarten education, raising taxes on the wealthy and reducing the income disparities which have swelled under his predecessor. He becomes the first Democrat to lead the city in nearly a quarter of a century. (…)

One of Mr de Blasio’s first challenges will be the high expectations of unions who are pressing to renegotiate contracts that would boost their pay, by up to $7bn, retroactively. Mr de Blasio has also supported higher wages for more workers on city-funded projects.

Much of this is beyond the new mayor’s ability to deliver unilaterally. For example, his proposal to raise taxes on residents making more than $500,000 a year relies on the support both of Democratic governor Andrew Cuomo and the state legislature in far more conservative Albany.

Moreover, Mr de Blasio has to be careful not to erode the city’s tax base by giving more companies and wealthy residents the incentive to move to the suburbs or lower tax domiciles.

A New Way to Make Rational Resolutions

A scientific-based approach can help you better organize your personal goals.

Light bulb “Rationality isn’t about getting rid of emotions, but analyzing them and taking them into consideration when making decisions,”

 

NEW$ & VIEW$ (31 DECEMBER 2013)

Smile Small Businesses Anticipate Breakout Year Ahead

(…) Of 937 small-business owners surveyed in December by The Wall Street Journal and Vistage International, 52% said the economy had improved in 2013, up from 36% a year ago. Another 38% said they expect conditions to be even better in 2014, up from 27%.

Three out of four businesses said they expect better sales in 2014, and overall, the small business “confidence index”—based on business owners’ sales expectations, spending and hiring plans—hit an 18-month high of 108.4 in December. All respondents, polled online from Dec. 9 to Dec. 18, had less than $20 million in annual revenue and most had less than 500 employees.

According to the latest data from the National Federation of Independent Business, a Washington lobby group, small-business owners in November ranked weak sales below taxes and red tape as their biggest headache, for the first time since June 2008.

In the group’s most recent survey, owner sentiment improved slightly in November but was still dismal compared with pre-2007. (…)

U.S. Pending Home Sales Inch Up

The National Association of Realtors said Monday that its seasonally adjusted index of pending sales of existing homes rose 0.2% in November from the prior month to 101.7. The index of 101.7 is against a benchmark of 100, which is equal to the average level of activity in 2001, the starting point for the index.

The November uptick was the first increase since May when the index hit a six-year high, but it was less than the 1% that economists had forecast.

Pointing up The chart in this next piece may be the most important chart for 2014. I shall discuss this in more details shortly.

Who Wins When Commodities Are Weak? Developed economy central bankers were somewhat lauded before the financial crisis. Recently, though, they’re finding it harder to catch a break.

(…) Still, here’s a nice chart from which they might take some solace.  Compiled by Barclays Research it shows the gap between headline and core consumer price inflation across Group of Seven nations, superimposed on the International Monetary Fund’s global commodities index. As can be seen at a glance, the correlation is fairly good, showing, as Barclays says, the way commodity prices can act as a ‘tax’ on household spending power.

During 2004-08, that tax was averaging a hefty 0.8 percentage points a year in the G7,  quite a drag on consumption (not that that was necessarily a bad thing, looking back, consumption clearly did OK). However, since 2008. it has averaged just 0.1 percentage points providing some rare relief to the western consumer struggling with, fiscal consolidation, weak wage growth and stubbornly high rates of joblessness.

So, what’s the good news for central bankers here? Well, while a deal with Iran inked in late November to ease oil export sanctions clearly isn’t going to live up to its initial billing, at least in terms of lowering energy prices, commodity-price strength generally is still bumping along at what is clearly a rather weak historical level.

And the consequent very subdued inflation outlook in the U.S. and euro area means that central banks there can continue to fight on just one front, and focus on delivering stronger growth and improved labor market conditions.

Of course, weak inflation expectations can tell us other things too, notably that no one expects a great deal of growth, or upward pressure on wages. Moreover, as we can also see from the chart, the current period of commodity price stability is a pretty rare thing. Perhaps neither central bankers or anyone else should get too used to it.

Coffee cup  Investors Brace as Coffee Declines

Prices have tumbled 20% this year, capping the biggest two-year plunge in a decade and highlighting commodity markets’ struggle with a supply deluge.

(…) The sharp fall in coffee prices is the most prominent example of the oversupply situation that has beset many commodity markets, weighing on prices and turning off investors. Mining companies are ramping up production in some copper mines, U.S. farmers just harvested a record corn crop, and oil output in the U.S. is booming. The Dow Jones-UBS Commodity Index is down 8.6% year to date.

In the season that ended Sept. 30, global coffee output rose 7.8% to 144.6 million bags, according to the International Coffee Organization. A single bag of coffee weighs about 60 kilograms (about 132 pounds), an industry standard. Some market observers believe production could rise again in 2014. (…)

The U.S. Department of Agriculture forecasts that global coffee stockpiles will rise 7.5% to 36.3 million bags at the end of this crop year, an indication that supplies are expected to continue to outstrip demand in the next several months. (…)

The global coffee glut has its roots in a price rally more than three years ago. Farmers across the world’s tropical coffee belt poured money into the business, spending more on fertilizer and planting more trees as prices reached a 14-year high above $3 a pound in May 2011.(…)

Americans on Wrong Side of Income Gap Run Out of Means to Cope

As the gap between the rich and poor widened over the last three decades, families at the bottom found ways to deal with the squeeze on earnings. Housewives joined the workforce. Husbands took second jobs and labored longer hours. Homeowners tapped into the rising value of their properties to borrow money to spend.

Those strategies finally may have run their course as women’s participation in the labor force has peaked and the bursting of the house-price bubble has left many Americans underwater on their mortgages.

“We’ve exhausted our coping mechanisms,” said Alan Krueger, an economics professor at Princeton University in New Jersey and former chairman of President Barack Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers. “They weren’t sustainable.”

The result has been a downsizing of expectations. By almost two to one — 64 percent to 33 percent — Americans say the U.S. no longer offers everyone an equal chance to get ahead, according to the latest Bloomberg National Poll. The lack of faith is especially pronounced among those making less than $50,000 a year, with close to three-quarters in the Dec. 6-9 survey saying the economy is unfair. (…)

The diminished expectations have implications for the economy. Workers are clinging to their jobs as prospects fade for higher-paying employment. Households are socking away more money and charging less on credit cards. And young adults are living with their parents longer rather than venturing out on their own.

In the meantime, record-high stock prices are enriching wealthier Americans, exacerbating polarization and bringing income inequality to the political forefront. (…)

The disparity has widened since the recovery began in mid-2009. The richest 10 percent of Americans earned a larger share of income last year than at any time since 1917, according to Emmanuel Saez, an economist at the University of California at Berkeley. Those in the top one-tenth of income distribution made at least $146,000 in 2012, almost 12 times what those in the bottom tenth made, Census Bureau data show.

(…) The median income of men 25 years of age and older with a bachelor’s degree was $56,656 last year, 10 percent less than in 2007 after taking account of inflation, according to Census data.(…)

Those less well-off, meanwhile, are running out of ways to cope. The percentage of working-age women who are in the labor force steadily climbed from a post-World War II low of 32 percent to a peak of 60.3 percent in April 2000, fueling a jump in dual-income households and helping Americans deal with slow wage growth for a while. Since the recession ended, the workforce participation rate for women has been in decline, echoing a longer-running trend among men. November data showed 57 percent of women in the labor force and 69.4 percent of men. (…)

Households turned to stepped-up borrowing to help make ends meet, until that avenue was shut off by the collapse of house prices. About 10.8 million homeowners still owed more money on their mortgages than their properties were worth in the third quarter, according to Seattle-based Zillow Inc.

The fallout has made many Americans less inclined to take risks. The quits rate — the proportion of Americans in the workforce who voluntarily left their jobs — stood at 1.7 percent in October. While that’s up from 1.5 percent a year earlier, it’s below the 2.2 percent average for 2006, the year house prices started falling, government data show.

Millennials — adults aged 18 to 32 — are still slow to set out on their own more than four years after the recession ended, according to an Oct. 18 report by the Pew Research Center in Washington. Just over one in three head their own households, close to a 38-year low set in 2010. (…)

The growing calls for action to reduce income inequality have translated into a national push for a higher minimum wage. Fast-food workers in 100 cities took to the streets Dec. 5 to demand a $15 hourly salary. (…)

Cold Temperatures Heat Up Prices for Natural Gas

2013 by the Numbers: Bitter cold and tight supplies have helped spur a 32% rise in natural-gas futures so far this year, making it the year’s top-performing commodity.

(…) Not only are colder-than-normal temperatures spurring households and businesses to consume more of the heating fuel, the boom in U.S. output is starting to level off as well. These two factors are shrinking stockpiles and lifting prices. The amount of natural gas in U.S. storage declined by a record 285 billion cubic feet from the previous week and stood 7% below the five-year average in the week ended Dec. 13, according to the Energy Information Administration. (…)

Over the first 10 days of December, subzero temperatures in places such as Chicago and Minneapolis helped boost gas-heating demand by 37% from a year ago, the largest such gain in at least 14 years, according to MDA Weather Services, a Gaithersburg, Md., forecaster.

MDA expects below-normal temperatures for much of the nation to continue through the first week of January.

Spain retail sales jump 1.9 percent in November

Spain retail sales rose 1.9 percent year-on-year on a calendar-adjusted basis in November, National Statistics Institute (INE) reported on Monday, after registering a revised fall of 0.3 percent in October.

Retail sales had been falling every month for three years until September, when they rose due to residual effects from the impact of a rise in value-added tax (VAT) in September 2012.

Sales of food, personal items and household items all rose in November compared with the same month last year, and all kinds of retailers, from small chains to large-format stores, saw stronger sales, INE reported.

High five Eurozone retail sales continue to decline in December Surprised smile Ghost

image_thumb[5]Markit’s final batch of eurozone retail PMI® data for 2013 signalled an overall decline in sales for the fourth month running. The rate of decline remained modest but accelerated slightly, reflecting a sharper contraction in France and slower growth in Germany.

The overall decline would have been stronger were it not for a marked easing the rate of contraction in Italy, where the retail PMI hit a 33-month high.

The Markit Eurozone Retail PMI, which tracks month-on-month changes in the value of retail sales, fell back to 47.7 in December, from 48.0 in November. That matched October’s five-month low and indicated a moderate decline in sales. The average reading for the final quarter (47.8) was lower than in Q3 (49.5) but still the second-highest in over two years.

image_thumb[4]Retail sales in Germany rose for the eighth month running in December, but at the weakest rate over this sequence. Meanwhile, the retail downturn in France intensified, as sales fell for the fourth successive month and at the fastest pace since May. Retail sales in France have risen only twice in the past 21 months. Italy continued to post the sharpest decline in sales of the three economies, however, despite seeing a much slower fall in December. The Italian retail PMI remained well below 50.0 but rose to a 33-month high of 45.3, and the gap between it and the German retail PMI was the lowest in nearly three years.

Retail employment in the eurozone declined further in December, reflecting ongoing job shedding in France and Italy. The overall decline across the currency area was the steepest since April. German retailers expanded their workforces for the forty third consecutive month.

EARNINGS WATCH

Perhaps lost among the Holidays celebrations, Thomson Reuters reported on Dec. 20 that

For Q4 2013, there have been 109 negative EPS preannouncements issued by S&P 500 corporations compared to 10 positive EPS preannouncements. By dividing 109 by 10, one arrives at an N/P ratio of 10.9 for the S&P 500 Index. If it persists, this will be the most negative guidance sentiment on record.

Strangely, this is what they reported On Dec. 27:

For Q4 2013, there have been 108 negative EPS preannouncements issued by S&P 500 corporations compared to 11 positive EPS preannouncements.

Hmmm…things are really getting better!

On the other hand, the less volatile Factset’s tally shows no deterioration in negative EPS guidance for Q4 at 94 while positive guidance rose by 1 to 13.

The official S&P estimates for Q4 were shaved another $0.06 last week to $28.35 while 2014 estimates declined 0.3% from $122.42 to $122.11. Accordingly, trailing 12-months EPS should rise 5.1% to $107.40 after Q4’13.

Factset on cash flows and capex:

S&P 500 companies generated $351.3 billion in free cash flow in Q3, the second largest amount in at least ten years. This amounted to 7.2% growth year-over-year, and, as a result of slower growth in fixed capital expenditures (+2.2%), free cash flow (operating cash flow less fixed capital expenditures) grew at a higher rate of 11.3%. Free cash flows were also at their second highest quarterly level ($196.8 billion) in Q3.

S&P 500 fixed capital expenditures (“CapEx”) amounted to $155.0 billion in Q3, an increase of 2.2%. This marks the third consecutive quarter of single-digit, year-over-year growth following a period when growth averaged 18.5% over eleven quarters. Because the Energy sector’s CapEx spending represented over a third of the S&P 500 ex-Financials total, its diminished spending (-1.6% year-over-year) has had a great impact on the overall growth rate.

Despite a moderation in quarterly capital investment, trailing twelve-month fixed capital expenditures grew 6.1% and reached a new high over the ten-year horizon. This helped the trailing twelve-month ratio of CapEx to sales (0.068) hit a 13.7% premium to the ratio’s ten-year average. Overall, elevated spending has been a product of aggressive investment in the Energy sector over two and a half years, but, even when excluding the Energy sector, capital expenditures levels relative to sales were above the ten-year average.

image_thumb[1]

Going forward, however, analysts are projecting that the CapEx growth rate will slide, as the projected growth for the next twelve months of 3.9% is short of that of the trailing twelve-month period. In addition, growth for capital expenditures is expected to continue to slow in 2014 (+1.6%) due, in part, to negative expected growth rates in the Utilities (-3.2%) and Telecommunication Services (-3.0%) sectors.

Gavyn Davies The three big macro questions for 2014

1. When will the Fed start to worry about supply constraints in the US?

(…) The CBO estimates that potential GDP is about 6 percent above the actual level of output. This of course implies that the Fed could afford to delay the initial rise in short rates well beyond the 2015 timescale that the vast majority of FOMC participants now deem likely. The very low and falling rates of inflation in the developed world certainly support this.

But the suspicion that labour force participation, and therefore supply potential, may have been permanently damaged by the recession is gaining ground in some unexpected parts of the Fed, and the unemployment rate is likely to fall below the 6.5 percent threshold well before the end of 2014 (see Tim Duy’s terrific blog on this here)This is the nub of the matter: will Janet Yellen’s Fed want to delay the initial rate rise beyond the end of 2015, and will they be willing to fight the financial markets whenever the latter try to price in earlier rate hikes, as they did in summer 2013? I believe the answer to both these questions is “yes”, but there could be several skirmishes on this front before 2014 is over. Indeed, the first may be happening already.

2. Will China bring excess credit growth under control?

Everyone now agrees that the long run growth rate in China has fallen from the heady days when it exceeded 10 per cent per annum, but there are two very different views about where it is headed next. The optimistic version, exemplified by John Ross’ widely respected blog, is that China has been right to focus on capital investment for several decades, and that this will remain a successful strategy. John points out that, in order to hit the official target of doubling real GDP between 2010 and 2020, growth in the rest of this decade can average as little as 6.9 per cent per annum, which he believes is comfortably within reach, while the economy is simultaneously rebalanced towards consumption. This would constitute a very soft landing from the credit bubble.

The pessimistic view is well represented by Michael Pettis’ writing, which has been warning for several years that the re-entry from the credit bubble would involve a prolonged period of growth in the 5 per cent region at best. Repeated attempts by the authorities to rein in credit growth have had to be relaxed in order to maintain GDP growth at an acceptable rate, suggesting that there is a conflict between the authorities’ objective to allow the market to set interest rates, and the parallel objective to control the credit bubble without a hard landing.

As I argued recently, there is so far no sign that credit growth has dropped below the rate of nominal GDP growth, and the bubble-like increases in housing and land prices are still accelerating. The optimistic camp on China’s GDP has been more right than wrong so far, and a prolonged soft landing still seems to be the best bet, given China’s unique characteristics. But the longer it takes to bring credit under control, the greater the chance of a much harder landing.

3. Will the ECB confront the zero lower bound?

Whether it should be described as secular stagnation or Japanification, the euro area remains mired in a condition of sluggish growth and sub-target inflation that will be worsened by the latest bout of strength in the exchange rate. Mario Draghi said this week that

We are not seeing any deflation at present… but we must take care that we don’t have inflation stuck permanently below one percent and thereby slip into the danger zone.

This does not seem fully consistent with the ECB’s inflation target of “below but close to 2 per cent”. Meanwhile, the Bundesbank has just published a paper which confidently denies that there is any risk of deflation in the euro area, and says that declining unit labour costs in the troubled economies are actually to be welcomed as signs that the necessary internal rebalancing within the currency zone is taking place.

The markets will probably be inclined to accept this, as long as the euro area economy continues to recover. This seems likely in the context of stronger global growth.

But a further rise in the exchange rate could finally force the ECB to confront the zero lower bound on interest rates, as the Fed and others have done in recent years. Mr Draghi has repeatedly shown that he has the ability to navigate the tricky politics that would be involved here, but a pre-emptive strike now seems improbable. In fact, he might need a market crisis to concentrate some minds on the Governing Council.

So there we have the three great issues in global macro, any one of which could take centre stage in the year ahead. For what it is worth, China currently seems to me by far the most worrying.

SENTIMENT WATCH

Goldman’s Top Economist Just Answered The Most Important Questions For 2014 — And Boy Are His Answers Bullish

Goldman Sachs economist Jan Hatzius is out with his top 10 questions for 2014 and his answers to them. Below we quickly summarize them, and provide the answers.

1. Will the economy accelerate to above-trend growth? Yes, because the private sector is picking up, and there’s going to be very little fiscal drag.

2. Will consumer spending improve? Yes, because real incomes will grow, and the savings rate has room to decline.

3. Will capital expenditures rebound? Yes, because nonresidential fixed investment will catch up to consumer demand.

4. Will housing continue to recover? Yes, the housing market is showing renewed momentum.

5. Will labor force participation rate stabilize? Yes, but at a lower level that previously assumed.

6. Will profit margins contract? No, there’s still plenty of slack in the labor market for this to be an issue.

7. Will core inflation stay below the 2% target? Yes.

8. Will QE3 end in 2014? Yes.

9. Will the market point to the first rate hike in 2016? Yes.

10. Will the secular stagnation theme gain more adherents? No. With the deleveraging cycle over, people will believe less in the idea that we’re permanently doomed.

So basically, every answer has a bullish tilt. The economy will be above trend, margins will stay high, the Fed will stay accommodative, and inflation will remain super-low. Wow.

High five But wait, wait, that does not mean  equity markets will keep rising…

David Rosenberg is just as bullish on the economy, with much more meat around the bones, but he also discusses equity markets.

Good read: (http://breakfastwithdave.newspaperdirect.com/epaper/viewer.aspx)

Snail U.S. Population Growth Slows to Snail’s Pace

America’s population grew by just 0.72%, or 2,255,154 people, between July 2012 and July 2013, to 316,128,839, the Census said on Monday.

That is the weakest rate of growth since the Great Depression, according to an analysis of Census data by demographer William Frey of the Brookings Institution.

Separately, the Census also said Monday it expects the population to hit 317.3 million on New Year’s Day 2014, a projected increase of 2,218,622, or 0.7%, from New Year’s Day 2013. (…)

The latest government reports suggest state-to-state migration remains modest. While middle-age and older people appear to be packing their bags more, the young—who move the most—are largely staying put. Demographers are still waiting to see an expected post-recession uptick in births as U.S. women who put off children now decide to have them. (…)

Call me   HAPPY AND HEALTHY 2014 TO ALL!

 

NEW$ & VIEW$ (26 DECEMBER 2013)

Signs Point to Stronger Economy

A pickup in business investment and robust new-home sales point to an economy on stronger footing as the year winds to a close.

(…) Orders for U.S. durable goods rose 3.5% last month, reversing a decline in October, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. Excluding the volatile transportation category, manufactured-goods orders rose 1.2%, the strongest gain since May.

Meanwhile, Americans continued to purchase new homes at a brisk pace in November, the Commerce Department said in a separate report this week, the latest sign the housing market is regaining traction after a rise in mortgage rates. New-home sales hit a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 464,000 last month, down only 2.1% from October’s upwardly revised annual rate of 474,000. October and November marked the two strongest months of new-home sales since mid-2008.

The pair of reports showed renewed optimism by businesses and prospective homeowners, two of the biggest drivers of the economy, and led Macroeconomic Advisers to raise its estimate for fourth-quarter growth. It now forecasts gross domestic product to expand at an annualized rate of 2.6% in the final three months of the year, up three-tenths of a percentage point from an earlier estimate.

The overall durable-goods increase was driven by business investment, particularly in civilian aircraft orders, which rose nearly 22%. But a broader measure of business spending on software and equipment rose at a solid pace in November after falling in recent months. Orders for nondefense capital goods, excluding aircraft, increased by 4.5%, its strongest pace since January. That could be a sign businesses stepped up spending after the partial government shutdown in October. (Chart and table from Haver Analytics)

image

 

large image large image

 

U.S. Consumer Spending Up 0.5% in November

Americans stepped up their spending in November, boding well for holiday sales and offering the latest sign the U.S. recovery is gaining momentum.

Personal consumption, reflecting what consumers spend on everything from televisions to health care, climbed 0.5% in November from a month earlier, the fastest pace since June, the Commerce Department said Monday. The gain was driven by a boost in spending on big-ticket items, more than half of which came from automobile and parts buying, and on services.

But tepid income growth could limit future gains. Personal income increased 0.2% in November after falling 0.1% in October. As a result, consumers dipped into their savings to maintain their spending. (…)

cat

The price index for personal consumption expenditures, the Federal Reserve’s preferred gauge for inflation, was flat in November from a month earlier, the second consecutive month prices went unchanged. From a year earlier, prices were up 0.9% in November, after being up 0.7% in October.

Core prices, which exclude volatile food and energy costs, rose 0.1% from October and 1.1% from a year prior.

Nerd smile What’s wrong with this chart?

large image

Personal income gained a disappointing 0.2% (2.3% y/y) after a minimal dip in October. Disposable personal income increased just 0.1% (1.5% y/y), held back by a 0.8% rise (9.0% y/y) in tax payments. Wages & salaries increased 0.4% but the 2.2% year-to-year increase was the weakest since mid-2010.

Real disposable income rose 0.3% during the last 3 months, a very weak 1.2% annualized rate that lead to a very low 0.6% YoY increase in November. Meanwhile, real expenditures rose 1.1%, a 4.5% annualized rate. November real spending was up 2.6% YoY. Americans just keep dissaving to sustain their living standard. For how long?

large image

Meanwhile, Christmas sales are fuzzy:

This chart plots weekly chain store sales which have been in a narrow +2.0-2.3% YoY gain channel since the spring. Weak!

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But Online Sales Jumped 37% During Weekend

(…) After mall-traffic tracker ShopperTrak on Monday reported a 3.1% decline in holiday in-store sales and a 21% plunge in store traffic in the crucial shopping week ended Sunday, additional data again suggest a much brighter picture online. Total online sales from Friday through Sunday surged 37% year-to-year, with mobile traffic representing two-fifths of all online traffic, according to IBM Digital Analytics. Consumers buying from their mobile devices sent mobile sales up 53%, accounting for 21.5% of all online sales, IBM said. (…)

Sad smile With what looks to be a disappointing holiday season, Retail Metrics’ Ken Perkins said Tuesday that fourth-quarter retail sales for the 120 chains it tracks is now expected to rise just an average of 1.9%, the weakest since third-quarter 2009. Profit growth is expected to be just 1.3%, also the weakest since third-quarter 2009, “when retailers were still clawing their way out of the Great Recession.”

Fourth-quarter same-store sales are expected to rise an unimpressive 1.1%.

“It has been a very disappointing holiday season to date for most of retail,” said Mr. Perkins.

Late Surge in Web Buying Blindsides UPS, Retailers A surge in online shopping this holiday season left stores breaking promises to deliver packages by Christmas, suggesting that retailers and shipping companies still haven’t fully figured out consumers’ buying patterns in the Internet era.

(…) E-commerce accounts for about 6% of overall U.S. retail sales, according to the Commerce Department. This holiday season, online purchases will be nearly 14% of sales, estimates the National Retail Federation.

During the last shopping weekend before Christmas, Web sales jumped 37% from the year before, according to IBM Digital Analytics. Market research firm Forrester Research expects online sales to increase 15% this holiday season amid slow mall traffic and weak sales at brick-and-mortar retailers.

Coming back to the slow income growth trends:

 

Mortgage Applications Drop to 13-Year Low

The average number of mortgage applications slipped 6.3% to a 13-year low on a seasonally adjusted basis as interest rates rose from the previous week, the Mortgage Bankers Association said.

Following last week’s 6.1% drop, applications for purchase mortgages were down another 3.5% w/w to the lowest level since February 2012. The purchase index is currently tracking down 11.5% y/y. (…)  Application activity remains below both the recently reported y/y growth in new home sales (+22% in October) and existing home sales (-1.2% in November), led by a declining mix of first-time buyers within both segments. Recent data also suggests mortgage credit availability has tightened slightly more. (…)

The average contract rate on 30-year fixed conforming mortgages increased 2 bp w/w to 4.64%, matching the highest level since September, and is now up 105 bp since bottoming during the week ended May 3. Overall mortgage rates are up 113 bp y/y, as the spread relative to the 10-year Treasury note has now expanded 1 bp y/y to 175 bp.

BTW, FYI:

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Calm returns to China’s money markets Central bank skips open market operations

China Expects 7.6% Growth in 2013 China’s economy will post growth of 7.6% for all of 2013, a top planning official said, indicating that the world’s second-largest economy will exceed Beijing’s 7.5% target but that it also lost momentum in the final months of the year.

(…) China’s economy posted year-over-year growth of 7.8% in the third quarter after expanding at 7.7% in the first quarter and 7.5% in the second quarter amid a still sluggish global economy. A “mini-stimulus” of government investment in rail and subway construction coupled with tax and other business incentives helped boost growth in the July-September period. (…)

Ninja I suspect the Chinese are spying on NTU which revealed the Q4 slowdown on Dec. 18.

Christmas spirit does little for Spain
Subdued domestic demand weighs on the economy

(…) Retail sales are still a quarter lower than they were before Spain slid into economic crisis more than five years ago, and some shop owners say they have seen little change in consumer behaviour so far. (…)

Until now, the recovery has been driven almost exclusively by rising exports, with domestic demand acting as a drag on growth. The surge in shipments to foreign markets was sufficiently strong to lift Spain out of recession in the third quarter this year, and has given companies the confidence to start investing in plants and machinery. But economists warn that Spain will be stuck with anaemic growth at best as long as domestic demand remains as subdued as it is now.

There are some signs of hope. According to the Bank of Spain, the decline in overall household consumption slowed in the third quarter. Spanish retail sales actually rose 2.1 per cent on an annual basis in September, the first such increase in more than three years, but fell back into negative territory the next month. Consumer confidence has risen sharply and car sales – helped by a government subsidy programme – are also up.

Javier Millán-Astray, director-general of Spain’s association of department stores and retail chains, notes that sales on the first big shopping weekend of the holiday season were up 8 per cent compared with last year, and predicts an overall rise in Christmas sales of 6-7 per cent compared with 2012. “We have seen a change in the trend since August. Sales have still been falling but the drops are much smaller than before. And the truth is that the first weekend of the Christmas season was much better than the year before.” (…)

 

NEW$ & VIEW$ (23 DECEMBER 2013)

Surprised smile Economy Gaining Momentum The U.S. economy grew at a healthy 4.1% annual rate in the third quarter, revised figures showed, boosting hopes that the recovery is shifting into higher gear after years of sluggishness.

Friday’s report showed consumer spending—a key driver of the economy—grew at a 2% annual rate in the summer, instead of the previously estimated 1.4%.

U.S. Economy Starts to Gain Momentum

ZeroHedge drills down:

(…) many are wondering just where this “revised” consumption came from: of the $15 billion revised increase in annualized spending, 60% was for healthcare, and another 27% was due to purchases of gasoline. The third largest upward revision: recreation services. On the flip side, the biggest revision detractors: transportation services and housing and utilities.

No boost to retailing from these revisions.

Meanwhile, profit margins keep defying the naysayers, this time because of lower taxes:

(…) after-tax corporate profits in the third quarter topped 11% of gross domestic product for the first time since the records started in 1947. At the same time, taxes paid by corporations has declined nearly 5% in the third quarter compared with a year earlier.

Another positive sign?

The U.S. economy seems to be getting “a little bit better,” said General Electric Co. Chief Executive Jeff Immelt, speaking after an investor meeting this past week. “We’ve seen some improvements in commercial demand for credit,” he said, a positive sign that companies are investing.

Wells Fargo CEO said same 10 days ago.

Is it because companies are finally investing…or because companies must now finance  out of line inventories due to the lack of growth in final demand?

real final sales

 

On the one hand, the official GDP is accelerating beyond any forecasts. On the other hand, final demand is slowing to levels which most of the time just preceded a recession. Go figure! Confused smile

But don’t despair, on the next hand, here’s David Rosenberg painting a “Rosie” scenario for us all (my emphasis):

(…) But things actually are getting better. The Institute for Supply Management figures rarely lie and they are consistent with 3.5% real growth. Federal fiscal policy is set to shift to neutral from radical
restraint and the broad state/local government sector is no longer shedding jobs and is, in fact, spending on infrastructure programs again.

On top of that, manufacturing is on a visible upswing. Net exports will be supported by a firmer tone to the overseas economy. The deceleration to zero productivity growth, which has a direct link to profit margins, will finally incentivize the business sector to invest organically in their own operations with belated positive implications for capex growth.

But the centrepiece of next year’s expected acceleration really boils down to the consumer. It is the most essential sector at more than 70% of GDP. And what drives spending is less the Fed’s quest for a ‘wealth effect,’ which only makes rich people richer, but more organic income, 80% of which comes from working. And, in this sense, the news is improving, and will continue to improve. I’ll say it until I’m blue in the face. Freezing

Indeed, all fiscal policy has to do is shift to neutral, and a 1.5-percentage-point drag on growth — the major theme for 2013 — will be alleviated. With that in mind, the two-year budget deal that was just cobbled together by Paul Ryan and Patty Murray at the least takes much of the fiscal stranglehold off the economy’s neck, while at the same time removing pervasive sources of uncertainty over the policy outlook.

Since the pool of available labour is already shrinking to five-year lows and every measure of labour demand on the rise, one can reasonably expect wages to rise discernibly in coming years, unless, that is, you believe the laws of supply and demand apply to every market save for the labour market.

Pointing up Let’s get real: By hook or by crook, wages are going up next year (minimum wages for sure and this trend is going global). With this in mind, the most fascinating statistic this past week was not ISM or nonfarm payrolls, but the number of times the Beige Book commented on wage pressures: 26. That’s not insignificant. Again, when I talked about this at the Thursday night dinner, eyeballs rolled.

There was much discussion about the lacklustre holiday shopping season thus far, with November sales below plan. There was little talk, however, about auto sales hitting a seven-year high in November even with lower incentives. And what’s a greater commitment to the economy — a car or a cardigan?

As I sifted through the Beige Book to see which areas of the economy were posting upward wage pressure and growing skilled labour shortages, I could see it cut a large swath: technology, construction, transportation services, restaurants, durable goods manufacturing.

Of the 115 million people currently working in the private sector, roughly 40 million of them are going to be reaping some benefits in the form of a higher stipend and that is 35% of the jobs pie right there. That isn’t everyone, but it is certainly enough of a critical mass to spin the dial for higher income growth (and spending) in the coming year. Macro surprises are destined to be on the high side — take it from a former bear who knows how to identify stormy clouds. (…)

On the consumer side, the aggregate debt/disposable income ratio has dropped from 125% at the 2007 peak to 100%, where it was a decade ago (down to 95% excluding student loans, an 11-year low). In other words, the entire massive 2002-07 credit expansion has been reversed, and, as such, the household sector is in far better financial position to contribute to economic activity.

On the government side, the U.S. federal deficit, 10% of GDP just four years ago, is below 4% today and on its way to below 3% a year from now, largely on the back of tough spending cuts and a big tax bite.

Then throw in the vast improvement in the balance-of-payments situation, courtesy of the energy revolution. With oil import volumes trimmed 5% over the past year and oil export volumes up a resounding 30%, the petroleum deficit in real terms has been shaved by one-quarter in just the last 12 months. This, in turn, has cut the current account deficit in half to 3% of GDP from the nearby high of 6%. (…)

In a nutshell, I feel like 2014 is going to feel a lot like 2004 and 1994 when the economy surprised to the high side after a prolonged period of unsatisfactory post-recession growth. Reparation of highly leveraged balance sheets delayed, but, in the end, did not derail a vigorous expansion.

High five That by no means guarantees a stellar year for the markets, because, as we saw in 2013 with a softer year for the economy, multiple expansion premised on Fed-induced liquidity can act as a very powerful antidote. Plus, a rising bond-yield environment will at some point provide some competition for the yield delivered by the stock market.

While 1994 and 2004 were hardly disasters, the market generated returns both years that were 10 percentage points lower than they were the prior year even with a more solid footing to the economy — what we gained in terms of growth, we gave up in terms of a less supportive liquidity/monetary policy backdrop.

But make no mistake, the upside for next year from a business or economic perspective as opposed to from a market standpoint is considerable.

Just kidding It is open for debate as to how the stock market will respond, but it is not too difficult to predict where bond yields will be heading (up) since they are, after all, cyclical by nature. Within equities, this means caution on the rate-sensitives and the macro backdrop will augur for growth over value.

Thanks David, but…

First, let’s set the record straight:

  • According to Edmunds.com’s Total Cost of Incentives (TCI) calculations, car incentives on average were flat from a year ago, though some automakers increased their incentives and even others lowered them. One car dealer said that manufacturers are pushing retailers to buy more vehicles, “slipping back into old habits”.
  • The S&P 500 Index peaked at 482 in January 1994, dropped 8% to 444 at the end of June and closed the year at 459. EPS jumped 18% that year while inflation held steady around 2.5%.
  • In 2004, equity markets were essentially flat all year long before spiking 7% during the last 2 months of the year. Profits jumped 24% that year while inflation rose from 1.9% to 3.3%.
  • In both years, equity valuations were in a correction mode coming from Rule of 20 overvalued levels in the previous years.

Second, we should remember that car sales have been propelled by the huge pent up demand that built during the financial crisis. Like everything else, this will taper eventually. The fact remains that car sales have reached the levels of the previous 4 cyclical peaks. Consider that there are fewer people actually working these days, even fewer working full time, that the younger generation is not as keen as we were to own a car and that credit conditions remain very tight for a large “swath” of the population. And just to add a fact often overlooked by economists, car prices are up 8% from 2008 while median household income is unchanged. (Chart from CalculatedRisk)

Third, it may be true that the ISM figures rarely lie but we will shortly find out if recent production strength only served to grow inventories. To be sure, car inventories are currently very high, prompting some manufacturers to cut production plans early in 2014.

Fourth, building an economic scenario based on accelerating wages invites a discussion on inflation and interest rates, both key items for equity valuation and demand. There is no money to be made from economic scenarios, only from financial instruments. Rosie’s scenario may not be as rosy for financial markets if investors become concerned about labour demand exceeding supply. (See Lennar’s comments below).

Ghost  Gasoline Heats Up in U.S.

Futures prices rose 5.9% last week in response to signs of unusually srong demand for the fuel.

Gasoline for January delivery rose 4.3 cents, or 1.6%, to $2.7831 a gallon Friday on the New York Mercantile Exchange.

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Pressure builds as retailers near the holiday finish line

(…) Thom Blischok, chief retail strategist and a senior executive adviser with Booz & Company’s retail practice in San Francisco, said many U.S. shoppers are holding back this season because they have fewer discretionary dollars.

“Sixty-five percent of (Americans) are survivalists. They are living from paycheck to paycheck,” he said. “Those folks simply don’t have any money to celebrate Christmas.”

People with annual income of $70,000 and up account for 33 percent of U.S. households, but 45 percent of spending, according to U.S. Census data crunched by AlixPartners. That group has seen the most benefit from the improving economy as rising home and stock prices bolster their net worth.

But even those with higher incomes are holding back.

“The era of ‘living large’ is now officially in the rear-view mirror,” said Ryan McConnell, who heads the Futures Company’s US Yankelovich Monitor survey of consumer attitudes and values.

Responses to the 2013 survey suggested that the “hangover effect” of the so-called Great Recession remained prevalent with 61 percent of respondents agreeing with the statement: “I’ll never spend my money as freely as I did before the recession.” (…)

Competing for shoppers led major retailers to significantly ramp up the frequency of their promotions in the first part of December, according to data prepared for Reuters by Market Track, a firm that provides market research for top retailers and manufacturers.

A group of eight major retail chains, including J.C. Penney Co Inc, Wal-Mart Stores Inc  and Best Buy Co Inc, increased the number of circulars they published between December 3 and December 18 nearly 16 percent over the comparable period a year earlier.

Those retailers, which also include Sears and Kmart, Macy’s Inc, Kohl’s Corp and Target Corp, ramped up the online deals even more, increasing the number of promotional emails by 54.5 percent, according to the Market Track data.

The battle for shoppers has also led to the most discount-driven season since the recession, according to analysts and executives.

“There is a quicker turnover of promotions this year, and now several times, within a day,” eBay Enterprise CEO Chris Saridakis said. “It’s an all-out war.”

Clock  Shoppers Grab Sweeter Deals in Last-Minute Holiday Dash

U.S. shoppers flocked to stores during the last weekend before Christmas as retailers piled on steeper, profit-eating discounts to maximize sales in their most important season of the year.

Retailers were offering as much as 75 percent off and keeping stores open around the clock starting Friday. “Super Saturday” was expected to be one of the busiest shopping days of the year, according to Chicago-based researcher ShopperTrak. (…)

Holiday purchases will rise 2.4 percent, the weakest gain since 2009, ShopperTrak has predicted. Sales were up 2 percent to $176.7 billion from the start of the season on Nov. 1 through Dec. 15, said the firm, which will update its figures later today. The National Retail Federation reiterated on Dec. 12 its prediction that total sales will rise 3.9 percent in November and December, more than the 3.5 percent gain a year ago.

Factset concludes with the important stuff for investors: Most S&P 500 Retail Sub-Industries Are Projected to Report a Decline in Earnings in Q4

In terms of year-over-year earnings growth, only five of the thirteen retail sub-industries in the S&P 500 are predicted to report growth in earnings for the fourth quarter. Of these five sub-industries, the
Internet Retail (66.7%) and Automotive Retail (10.3%) sub-industries are expected to see the highest earnings growth. On the other hand, the Food Retail (-20.2%), General Merchandise Stores (-10.6%), and Apparel Retail (-8.8%) sub-industries are expected to see the lowest earnings growth for the quarter.

Overall, there has been little change in the expected earnings growth rates of these thirteen retail subindustries since Black Friday. Only four sub-industries have recorded decreases in expected earnings growth of more than half a percentage point since Black Friday: Drug Retail, Food Retail, General Merchandise, and Hypermarkets & Supercenters. On the hand, no sub-industry has recorded an increase in expected earnings growth of more than half a percentage point since November 29.

These folks are unlikely to be jolly unless Congress acts, again at the last hour:

Tom Porcelli, chief U.S. economist at RBC Capital Markets, estimates that 1.3 million folks will lose their unemployment checks after this week, forcing some to take jobs they previously passed up or join the legions of workforce dropouts. If even half do the latter, the jobless rate could slip to 6.6% in fairly short order. (Barron’s)

This could have interesting consequences as JP Morgan explains:

(…) the potential expiration of federal extended unemployment benefits (formally called Emergency Unemployment Compensation) at the end of this month could push the measured unemployment rate lower.

The state of North Carolina offers a potential testing ground for this thesis. In July, the North Carolina government decided to no longer offer extended benefits, even though the state still met the economic conditions to qualify for this federal program. Since July, the North Carolina unemployment rate has fallen 1.5%-points; in the same period the national unemployment rate has fallen 0.4%-point. (…)

The information from one data point is a long way from statistical certainty, but the limited evidence from North Carolina suggests that the potential expiration of extended benefits will place further downward pressure on the measured unemployment rate. In which case the Fed could soon have some ‘splainin’ to do about what “well past” 6.5% means with respect to their unemployment rate threshold.

GPSWebNote ImageGPSWebNote Image

Rampant Returns Plague E-Retailers Behind the uptick in e-commerce is a secret: As much as a third of all Internet sales gets returned, in part because of easy policies on free shipping. Retailers are trying some new tactics to address the problem.

(…) Retailers are zeroing in on high-frequency returners like Paula Cuneo, a 54-year-old teacher in Ashland, Mass., who recently ordered 10 pairs of corduroy pants in varying sizes and colors on Gap Inc. GPS +0.73% ‘s website, only to return seven of them. Ms. Cuneo is shopping online for Christmas gifts this year, ordering coats and shoes in a range of sizes and colors. She will let her four children choose the items they want—and return the rest.

Ms. Cuneo acknowledged the high costs retailers absorb to take back the clothes she returns, but said retailers’ lenient shipping policies drove her to shop more.

“I feel justified,” she said. “After all, I am the customer.” (…)

HOUSING WATCH

FHFA to Delay Increase in Mortgage Fees by Fannie, Freddie

The incoming director of the regulatory agency that oversees Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac said he would delay an increase in mortgage fees charged by the housing-finance giants.

(…) Upon being sworn in, “I intend to announce that the FHFA will delay implementation” of the loan-fee increases “until such time as I have had the opportunity to evaluate fully the rationale for the plan,” he said in a statement.

The FHFA signaled that it would increase certain fees charged by Fannie and Freddie that are typically passed on to mortgage borrowers on Dec. 9, on the eve of Mr. Watt’s Senate confirmation. (…)

In updates posted to their websites on Monday, Fannie and Freddie showed that fees will rise sharply for many borrowers who don’t have down payments of at least 20% and who have credit scores of 680 to 760. (Under a system devised by Fair Isaac Corp., credit scores range from 300 to a top of 850.) (…)

Surely, the housing market does not need more headwinds. ISI’s homebuilders survey is continuing to plunge, existing house sales have declined sharply, and existing house prices are down -1.6% from their peak.  In addition, ISI’s house price survey has been flat for five months. On the other hand, NAHB’s survey is at a new high, and housing starts surged in November. Inventory accumulation?

Pointing up Meanwhile, costs are skyrocketing:

Lennar noted that while its “aggressive” pricing strategies led to significant margin improvements, labor and construction material costs last quarter were up about 12% from a year ago, and that labor costs were up by “more” than material costs. (CalculatedRisk)

I remain concerned that higher inflation is slowly sneaking in, hidden behind weighted indices while un-weighted measures suggest that prices are being regularly ratcheted up. The median CPI, measured by the Cleveland Fed, is still up 2.0% YoY even though the weighted CPI is down to +1.0% YoY.

Differences between changes in the CPI and the median consumer price
change underscore the impact of the distribution of price movements on our monthly interpretation of inflation. The median price change is a potentially useful indicator of current monetary inflation because it minimizes, in a nonsubjective way, the influence of these transitory relative price movements.

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Assume there is no abnormal inventory accumulation and that David Rosenberg’s scenario pans out, we might get both demand pull and cost push inflation simultaneously. Far from a rosy scenario. Mrs. Yellen would have her hands full.

Thumbs up Economic Conditions Snapshot, December 2013: McKinsey Global Survey results

As 2013 draws to a close, executives are more optimistic about economic improvements than they have been all year, both at home and in the global economy. They also anticipate that conditions will continue to improve, thanks to the steady (though modest) improvements in the developed world that many expect to see.

imageIn McKinsey’s newest survey on economic conditions, the responses affirm that economic momentum has shifted—and will continue to move—from the developed to the developing world, as we first observed in September. Indeed, executives say the slowdown in emerging markets was one of the biggest business challenges this year, and respondents working in those markets are less sanguine than others about the current state of their home economies.

Respondents from all regions agree, though, on the world economy: for the first time since we began asking in early 2012, a majority of executives say global conditions have improved in the past six months.
Looking ahead to 2014, many executives expect economic progress despite growing concern over asset bubbles and political conflicts—particularly in the United States. Respondents there say that ongoing political disputes and the government shutdown in October have had a
notable impact on business sentiment, despite the less noticeable effect on the country’s recent economic data. Still, at the company level, executives maintain the consistently positive views on workforce size, demand, and profits that they have shared all year. (…)

Amid the shifting expectations for growth that we saw in 2013, executives’ company-level views have held steady and been relatively positive throughout the year. Since March, respondents most often reported that their workforce sizes would stay the same, that demand
for their companies’ products would grow, and that their companies’ profits would increase over the next six months; the latest results are no different.

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Pointing up Executives are still very focused on increasing margins!

Across regions, executives working in developed Asia are the most optimistic—and those in the eurozone are the most pessimistic—about their companies’ prospects. Forty-four percent of those in developed Asia say their workforces will grow in the next six months, while just 7 percent say they will shrink; in contrast, 31 percent of executives in the eurozone expect a decrease in workforce size. Two-thirds of respondents in developed Asia expect demand for their companies’ products and services to increase in the coming months, and they are least likely among their peers in other regions to expect a decrease in company profits.

In their investment decisions, though, executives note a new concern: rising asset prices, which could affect company-level (as well as macroeconomic) growth in the coming year. Of the executives who say their companies are postponing capital investments or M&A decisions they would typically consider good for growth, the largest shares of the year now cite high asset valuations as a reason their companies are waiting.

Strains Grip China Money Markets

Borrowing costs in China’s money market soared again, as the central bank’s recent fund injection failed to appease jittery investors amid a seasonal surge in demand for cash by banks.

Borrowing costs in China’s money market soared again after a brief fall earlier Monday, as the central bank’s recent fund injection failed to appease jittery investors amid a seasonal surge in demand for cash by banks.

The seven-day repurchase-agreement rate, a benchmark measure of the cost that banks charge each other for short-term loans, rose to 9.8%, up from 8.2% Friday and its highest level since it hit 11.62% on June 20, at the peak of China’s summer cash crunch. (…)

The stress in the banking system has spread elsewhere, with stocks in Shanghai falling for a ninth straight day Friday to the weakest level in four months while government bonds dropped, pushing the 10-yield up to near the highest in eight years.

Vietnam’s Growth Picks Up

The country’s gross domestic product grew 5.42% this year, compared with 5.25% in 2012, the government’s General Statistics Office said Monday. Last year’s GDP, the slowest since 1999, was revised up from 5.03%. Inflation was down as well.

The government said on-year growth in the fourth quarter was 6.04%, compared with 5.54% in the third quarter.

Japan forecasts GDP growth of 1.4% for 2014
Planned sales tax increase forecast to hit consumption

The Japanese government forecast on Saturday that real gross domestic product will grow by 1.4 per cent for the fiscal year starting March 2014, slowing from an expected 2.6 per cent growth for the current year as a planned sales tax increase is seen dampening consumption. (…)

The government also forecast that consumer prices will rise by about 1.2 per cent in the 2014 fiscal year, without considering an impact from the sales tax hike. Consumer prices are expected to show a rise of 0.7 per cent in the current fiscal year. The Bank of Japan launched a massive monetary stimulus programme aimed at pushing the inflation rate up to 2.0 per cent in two years, in a bid to wrench the country out of a long phase of deflation.

SENTIMENT WATCH

 

U.S. Economy Begins to Hit Growth Stride

 

Even Skeptics Stick With Stocks

Money managers and analysts say they are beginning to think the Federal Reserve is succeeding in restoring economic growth.

(…) Ned Davis, founder of Ned Davis Research in Venice, Fla., and a skeptic by nature, told clients last week that the economic picture is brightening. “There are still mixed indicators regarding economic growth, but most of our forward-looking indicators are suggesting the economy is accelerating to at least ‘glass-half-full’ growth rates,” he wrote. (…)

Because they now think the economy is on the mend, many money managers share the view that, while 2014 probably won’t match 2013, indexes probably will finish the year with gains. (…)

Ageing stocks bull can still pack some power

(…) While the S&P 500 is unlikely to match the 27 per cent jump it achieved in 2013, the odds favour another strong year for equities. Investors with a long time horizon have little to fear from wading into the market, even after a 168 per cent run-up from the index’s post-financial crisis nadir. (…)

It is no secret that companies have cut their way to profitability growth. They have put off investment, including in wages and hiring; they have slashed their financing costs by issuing record amounts of debt at this year’s rock-bottom interest rates; and they have juiced earnings per share further by buying back and cancelling shares at a pace not seen for five years.

These are trends that will all be slow to reverse. Slack in the economy will keep the lid on what companies have to spend on employees, and the benefits of those low financing costs are locked in for years to come. To the extent that wages and interest rates rise, it will be because the economic outlook is brightening, which will fill in the missing piece of the puzzle: top line revenue growth. (…)

In the historical context, current return on equity for the S&P 500 is not high; at 14.1 per cent during the last quarterly reporting season, it was only 5 basis points above the average since 1990. Profit growth, in other words, is as likely to carry on rising as it is to U-turn. Confused smile

The path of least resistance for equities is still up. There is a whole swath of bond investors who are yet to reassess their overweights in that asset class, who may do so when January’s miserable annual statements land. The diversifying “alternative” investments – hedge fund-like mutual funds and their mutant brethren – remain too expensive to become significant parts of a portfolio for most investors.

The S&P 500’s down years have all, with the exception of 1994, been recession years. Of course, the spectre of 1994 is haunting, since that was precisely when the Federal Reserve last attempted a big reversal of policy and began to raise interest rates to choke off inflation.

There is an asterisk to even the most bullish equity forecast, which is that all bets will be off if the Fed loses control of rates, dragging bond yields higher not just in the US where they might be justified, but also across the world, where they could snuff out a nascent recovery in Europe and cause untold harm in emerging markets.

After the smooth market reaction to the announcement of a slowdown in quantitative easing last week, a disaster scenario looks even more unlikely. And lest we forget, tapering is not tightening, so 2014 is not 1994.

If the S&P 500 closes out the year where it began this week, 2013 will go down as the fifth best year for share price gains since the index was created in 1957. Each of the four occasions when it did better – 1958, 1975, 1995 and 1997 – were followed by an additional year of strong returns, ranging from 8.5 per cent to 26.7 per cent.

Equity markets should maintain their positive momentum as long as the global economy maintains its, and the odds look good. Even in middle age, a bull can pack some power.

Bull Calls United in Europe as Strategists See 12% Gain

Equities will rise 12 percent in 2014, according to the average projection of 18 forecasters tracked by Bloomberg News.Ian Scott of Barclays Plc says the StoxxEurope 600 Index can rally 25 percent because shares are cheap even after a 49 percent gain since 2011. (…)

The average estimate is the most bullish since at least 2010, with no strategist predicting a gain of less than 3.3 percent, and comes even as company analysts reduced income forecasts for an 85th straight week. While more than 2.7 trillion euros ($3.7 trillion) has been restored to European equity values since September 2011, shares would have to gain another 65 percent to match the advance in the Standard & Poor’s 500 Index during the last five years.

“You would have lacked credibility being bullish on Europe 18 months ago, although stocks were very cheap and the economy was bottoming,” said Paul Jackson, a strategist at Societe Generale SA inLondon, who predicts a 15 percent jump for the Stoxx 600 next year. “As soon as the market started to do well, suddenly everybody wants to listen. And now not only is everybody listening, but everyone is saying the same thing. The time to worry about the Armageddon scenario is gone.” (…)

Analysts have downgraded earnings estimates on European companies excluding the U.K. for 85 weeks, a record streak, according to Citigroup Inc. data on Bloomberg. Mark Burgess, chief investment officer at Threadneedle Asset Management Ltd., says European earnings will probably disappoint again. (…)

“The region remains beset by relatively poor growth dynamics compared with the rest of the developed world,” Burgess, who helps oversee $140 billion from London, said in e-mailed comments on Dec. 11. “This year’s stock market recovery could easily herald a false dawn. While for the first time in three years we believe Europe is likely to return to positive GDP growth in 2014, earnings growth is likely to be steady rather than dramatic.” (…)

Evans at Deutsche Bank says his team at Europe’s largest bank has become “increasingly convinced” that lending in the region will rebound and will help companies beat estimates in what he calls investors’ “complete loss of confidence in the earnings cycle.”

The ECB said in a quarterly survey released Oct. 30 that banks expect to relax standards on corporate lending this quarter. That’s the first such response since the fourth quarter of 2009 and, if it occurs, would mark the first easing of conditions since the second quarter of 2007. Lenders also plan to simplify access to consumer loans and mortgages, and predicted a rise in loan demand.

Everybody is jumping on the bandwagon on the basis of an accelerating economy and equity momentum.

Time to stay rationale and disciplined. Good luck, and happy holidays! Gift with a bow

 

NEW$ & VIEW$ (20 DECEMBER 2013)

The Fed is actively engaged in a communication blitz to convince investors that tapering is no big deal.

Fed’s Mortgage Role Expands The central bank’s asset purchases are a bigger share of the market as it begins to taper its bond-buying program.

(…) Because bond production has tumbled, the Fed’s share of total mortgage-bond purchases has risen significantly over the past three months.

The Fed bought about 90% of new, eligible mortgage-bond issuance in November, up from roughly two-thirds of such bonds earlier this year, according to data from J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. The Fed’s large role in the mortgage market means that even as it reduces its bond purchases, the market could enjoy considerable support from the central bank in the near term.

Well, we’ll see how things go as the elephant in the room is trying to back up through the front door.

Mortgage rates stood at 4.6% last week for the average 30-year, fixed-rate mortgage, according to the Mortgage Bankers Association. Rates had been as low as 3.6% in May.

The yield on the 10-year Treasury note, a key driver of trading in mortgage markets, hit a three-month high Thursday at 2.923%. (…)

The Fed’s plan to purchase at least $35 billion in mortgage securities in January compares with market-wide net mortgage-bond issuance of about $18 billion a month in recent months, said Mr. Jozoff. (…)

Despite taking initial steps to reduce its asset purchases, the Fed “will be still expanding our holdings of longer-term securities at a rapid pace,” said Federal Reserve Chairman Ben Bernanke at a news conference on Wednesday. “We’re not doing less,” Mr. Bernanke said. “I would dispute the idea that we’re not providing a lot of accommodation to the economy.” (…)

Mortgage applications fell to a 13-year low last week, a sign that mortgage volumes could remain low for now. (…)

Even Markit plays the Fed’s tune: Fed tapers as outlook improves, removing one more global economic uncertainty

Something that many overlooked – especially back in May, when talk of taper first appeared – is that the taper is not a tightening policy. It is merely a reduction in the pace at which the central bank is pumping money in to the financial markets. That total, which has been growing at $85bn every month since the Fed embarked on its third wave of Quantitative easing 15 months ago, will instead grow by $75bn per month from January onwards.

Ask any junky what happens during tapering (see Withdrawal Syndrom)

Remember, we are all parts of this huge experiment.

By the way:

 

  • U.S. Existing Home Sales Down 4.3% Sales of previously owned homes slipped to the lowest level in nearly a year in November, signaling that higher mortgage rates are making buyers wary.

Existing-home sales decreased 4.3% from the prior month to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 4.9 million, the National Association of Realtors said Thursday. Home sales fell by 1.2% from a year earlier, the first time in 29 months the year-over-year figure declined. (Chart from ZeroHedge)

  • From National Bank Financial:

The US housing market is facing some headwinds as evidenced by existing home sales which, in November, fell to the lowest since late 2012. The slump shouldn’t be entirely surprising considering the decline in
mortgage loans, the latter on pace to contract in Q4 at the fastest pace since 2011. Rising long rates partly explain why mortgage loans are drying up, but bad credit among one important segment of the population can also be having a detrimental effect.

Indeed the youth seem to be finding it difficult to qualify for loans
due to the lack of job opportunities but also due to bad credit. Note the disproportionate increase in student loan delinquencies in recent years.

And as today’s Hot Charts show, that may explain why the homeownership rate among the youth has dropped in recent years at a faster pace than that of any other age segment. So, barring new government measures to help address student debt and delinquencies, it may take longer for the housing market to fully recover from the crash that triggered the Great Recession. That’s one of the reasons why we expect home price inflation in 2014 to moderate somewhat from this year’s hot pace.

image

Currently, the U.S. economy is forming just over 400,000 new households per year as of the third quarter of 2013, significantly below the long-term average of just under 1.2 million. Given current population growth, America should be forming roughly 1 million new households each year.

However, the latest recession was so severe that it continues to suppress household formation. One piece of evidence: A growing percentage of young adults aged 18-34 are living with their parents. (…) We believe the “American Dream” of home ownership is intact and note the recent uptick in the home ownership rate as evidence of pent-up demand and an improving outlook for household formation given rising wealth and stronger job creation.

Kiesel just forgot to mention that rising wealth may not be reaching the 18-34 cohort just yet, while rising mortgage rates and restrictive credit scores are.

Philly Fed Weaker Than Expected

Just one day after the Fed announced a $10 billion taper to its monthly asset purchase program, the economic data has not been very good.  Of the five economic indicators released on Thursday, four came in weaker than expected.  One of those indicators was the Philly Fed report.  While economists were expecting the headline reading to come in at a level of 10, the actual reading was 7.0, which represented a slight increase from November’s reading of 6.5.

As shown, four of the nine components declined this month, led lower by Delivery Time and Prices Paid. The decline in Prices Paid should be a good sign for the Fed as it implies that inflation pressures remain contained.  On the upside, we saw the greatest improvement in Average Workweek and Shipments.  All in all, this morning’s report was pretty much neutral, but with a string of weaker than expected economic data just one day after the ‘taper’ was announced, one wonders if anyone at the Fed is beginning to have second thoughts.

High five Slight oversight by Bespoke: New Orders remain strong.

Jobless Claims Highest Since March

Jobless claims came in significantly higher than expected for the second straight week today (379K vs. 334K).  This week’s reading exceeded the spike we saw during the government shutdown and was the highest reading since March.  While the BLS blamed normal seasonal volatility, if the seasonality was so ‘normal’ why was it unexpected?  While last week’s rise was written off as a one off, two weeks is a little more notable.

After the increases of the last two weeks, the four-week moving average rose to 343.5K.  If the elevated levels of the last two weeks continue, it will start showing up more in this figure and that would be troubling especially given the Fed’s timing of the taper yesterday.

Conference Board Leading Economic Index: Fifth Month of Growth
 

The Conference Board LEI for the U.S. increased for the fifth consecutive month in November. Positive contributions from the yield spread, initial claims for unemployment insurance (inverted), and ISM® new orders more than offset negative contributions from consumer expectations for business conditions and building permits. In the six-month period ending November 2013, the leading economic index increased 3.1 percent (about a 6.4 percent annual rate), faster than the growth of 2.0 percent (about a 4.1 percent annual rate) during the previous six months. In addition, the strengths among the leading indicators have become more widespread.

Click to View
 

No recession in sight. Thumbs up

China cash injection fails to calm lenders
Stocks slide as money market rates stay dangerously high

An emergency cash injection by the Chinese central bank failed to calm the country’s lenders as money market rates climbed to dangerously high levels.

Analysts cited a variety of technical factors for the tightness in the Chinese financial system, but the sudden run-up in rates was an uncomfortable echo of a cash crunch that rattled global markets earlier this year.

Concerns focused on the rates at which Chinese banks lend to each other. The seven-day bond repurchase rate, a key gauge of short-term liquidity, was emblematic of their reluctance to part with cash. It averaged 7.6 per cent in morning trading on Friday, its highest since the crunch that hit China in late June. That was up 100 basis points from Thursday and far above the 4.3 per cent level at which it traded just a week ago.

The sharp increase occurred despite the central bank’s highly unusual decision to conduct a “short-term liquidity operation” on Thursday, providing a shot of credit to lenders struggling for cash. In a clear sign of its concern at the stress in financial markets, the People’s Bank of China used its account on Weibo, China’s version of Twitter, to announce the SLO. According to the central bank’s own rules, it is only supposed to confirm SLOs one month after completing them.

The China Business News, a state-owned financial newspaper, reported that the short-term injection was worth Rmb200bn ($33bn), a large amount. But traders blamed the central bank for letting market conditions deteriorate to the point of needing an emergency injection in the first place. The PBoC steadfastly refused to add liquidity to the market in recent weeks despite the banking system’s regular year-end scramble for cash.

Pointing up Lu Ting, an economist with Bank of America Merrill Lynch, said China’s financial system was entering a new era and policy makers were struggling to adapt. “The PBoC is faced with some serious challenges . . . and is confused,” he said. “The PBoC finds it much more likely than before to make [operational] mistakes.”

Mr Lu said he was confident that China would avoid a full-fledged repeat of June’s cash crunch because the central bank did not want to see an over-tightening of monetary conditions. Rather, he and other analysts said the PBoC appeared to have misjudged the flow of funds in the economy. (…)

 

NEW$ & VIEW$ (16 DECEMBER 2013)

U.S. Producer Prices Fall 0.1%

The producer-price index, which measures what firms pay for everything from lumber to light trucks, fell 0.1% from October, the Labor Department said Friday. That marked the third straight monthly decline, owing largely to a fall in gasoline costs from the summer. Excluding food and energy, “core” prices rose 0.1% in November after climbing 0.2% in October.

Compared with a year earlier, overall prices were up 0.7% in November, more than double the pace of the prior two months. Core prices climbed 1.3% in November from a year earlier after rising 1.4% year-over-year in October.

Half of U.S. Lives in Household Getting Benefits  The share of Americans living with someone receiving government benefits continued to rise well into the economic recovery, reflecting a weak labor market that pushed more families onto food stamps, Medicaid or other programs.

Nearly half of the U.S., or 49.2% of the population, live in a household that received government benefits in the fourth quarter of 2011, up from 45.3% three years earlier, the Census Bureau said.

Government benefits as defined by Census include Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security, food stamps, unemployment insurance, disability pay, workers’ compensation and other programs.

Part of the increase comes from an aging population, with the 16.4% of the population living in a household where someone gets Social Security and 15.1% where someone receives Medicare. That was up from 15.3% and 14%, respectively, at the end of 2008.

But the biggest increases were in benefits aimed at helping the poor. The program experiencing the sharpest rise in participation was food stamps, officially known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. About 16% of people lived in a household where someone was receiving SNAP benefits, up from just 11.4% at the end of 2008.

Participation in Medicaid, the government health-insurance program for the poor and disabled, also climbed. At the end of 2011, 26.9% of the population was living in a household where at least one member was receiving Medicaid benefits, up from 23.7% three years earlier.

(…) unemployment compensation is one of the smaller pieces of the safety net. The Census report showed 1.7% of people lived in households where someone was collecting unemployment compensation in the final quarter of 2011 up a bit from 1.4% in 2008.

Canadian Housing: The Bubble Debate

It is always difficult to spot a speculative bubble in advance, but in the case of Canadian housing the weight of evidence is clear in our view: Canada Housing Bubble

  • Price level: The IMF highlighted recently that Canada tops the list of the most expensive homes in the world, based on the house-to-rent ratio.
  • Broad Based: Real home prices have surged in every major Canadian city since 2000, not just in Toronto and Vancouver.
  • Over-Investment: Residential investment has risen to 7% of GDP, above the peak in the U.S. and far outpacing population growth.
  • High Debt: Household debt now stands at nearly 100% of GDP, on par with the U.S. at the peak of its housing boom. The increase in household debt as a percent of GDP since 2006 has been faster in Canada than anywhere else in the world, according to the World Bank.
  • Excessive Consumption: The readiness of Canadian households to take on new debt by using their homes as collateral has fueled the consumption binge. Outstanding balances on home equity lines of credit amount to about 13% of GDP, eclipsing the U.S. where it peaked at 8% of GDP at the height of the bubble.

The IMF and the BoC have argued that the air can be let out of the market slowly. But, as the old cliché goes, bubbles seldom end with a whimper. What could spoil the party? Higher interest rates are a logical candidate for ending the housing boom.

EARNINGS WATCH 

This Thomson Reuters chart has been around a lot lately, generally on its own, being apparently self-explicit.

ER_1209

The chart deserves some explanations, however:

  • The reason the ratio is so high currently is not really because many more companies have decreased guidance but rather because very few have raised it.

Over the past four quarters (Q412 – Q313), 86 companies on average have issued negative EPS guidance and 26 companies on average have issued positive EPS guidance. Thus, the number of companies issuing negative EPS guidance for Q4 is up only 3% compared to the one-year average, while the number of companies issuing positive EPS guidance for Q4 is down 54% compared to the one-year average. (Factset)

  • The chart uses Thomson Reuters data which seems to be the most negative among aggregators. Factset data show a negative/positive ratio of 7.8x. The ratio has deteriorated from 7.4x the previous week, however, as 5 more companies have issued negative guidance against zero positive.

(…) a record-high 94 companies in the S&P 500 index already have done so for the current quarter. Conversely, a record-low 12 have said they would do better. That ratio of 7.83 negative-to-positive warnings dwarfs any quarter going back to 2006, when FactSet began tracking such data.

  • So far 120 companies have issued outlooks. In a typical quarter, between 130 and 150 S&P 500 companies issue guidance.
  • In small and mid-cap stocks, the trend appears much less gloomy. Thomson Reuters data for S&P 400 companies shows 2.2 negative outlooks for every one positive forecast, while data for S&P 600 companies shows a similar ratio.

The bulk of negative preannouncements is in IT and Consumer Discretionary sectors which have also recorded the largest increase in negative preannouncements in recent weeks.image

In spite of the above, earnings estimates are not cut. Q4 estimates (as per S&P) are now $28.41 ($28.45 last week) while 2014 estimates have been shaved $0.13 to $122.42, up 13.8% YoY. Actually, 2014 estimates have increased 0.4% since September 30.

THE CHRISTMAS RALLY

This is December over the past ten years (Ryan Detrick, Senior Technical Strategist, Shaeffer’s Investment Research)

Is Santa Coming This Year?

Wait, wait!

Bespoke Investment suggests the market is oversold:

(…) Below is a one-year trading range chart of the S&P 500.  The blue shading represents between one standard deviation above and below its 50-day moving average (white line).  The red zone is between one and two standard deviations above the 50-day, and moves into or above this area are considered overbought.  As shown, after trading in overbought territory since October, the S&P has finally pulled back into its “normal” trading range this week.  Technicians will be looking for the 50-day to act as support in the near term if the index trades down to it.  A break below means we’ll potentially see a close in oversold territory for the first time since June.  

While the S&P 500 is just above its 50-day in terms of price, its 10-day advance/decline line is indeed oversold.  The 10-day A/D line measures the average number of daily advancers minus decliners in the index over the last 10 trading days.  This provides a good reading on short-term breadth levels.  The oversold reading in place right now means the last ten days have not been kind to market bulls.  Over the last year, however, moves into the green zone have been good buying opportunities.

Gift with a bow  And here’s your Christmas present:

The Santa Claus Rally Season Is About To Begin (crossingwallstreet.com/)

I took all of the historical data for the Dow Jones from 1896 through 2010 and found that the streak from December 22nd to January 6th is the best time of the year for stocks. (December 21st and January 7th have also been positive days for the market but only by a tiny bit.)

Over the 16-day run from December 22nd to January 6th, the Dow has gained an average of 3.23%. That’s 41% of the Dow’s average annual gain of 7.87% occurring over less than 5% of the year. (It’s really even less than 5% since the market is always closed on December 25th and January 1st. The Santa Claus Stretch has made up just 3.8% of all trading days.)

Here’s a look at the Dow’s average performance in December and January (December 21st is based at 100):

You should note how small the vertical axis is. Ultimately, we’re not talking about a very large move.

May I remind you that you can get all the dope on monthly stock returns in the “MARKET SMARTS” section of my sidebar. Here are the two charts that matter:

This is the simplified chart from RBC Capital Markets

image

Here is Doug Short’s:

WANT MORE?

Buy The “December Triple Witching” Dip (BofAML via ZeroHedge),

This Friday is December Triple Witching (the term used for the quarterly expiry of US equity index futures, options on equity index futures and equity options). Consistently the week of December Triple Witching is one strongest of the year for the S&P500. In the 31 years since the creation of equity index futures, the S&P500 has risen 74% of the time during this week. More recently, it has risen in ten of the past 12 years. With equity volatility fast approaching a buy signal, the conditions are growing ripe for an end to the month long range trade and resumption of the larger bull trend (we target 1840/1850 into year-end).

 
SENTIMENT WATCH
 

General Electric to raise dividend 16%  Largest increase by US manufacturing group since 2010

Hunger Grows for U.S. Corporate Bonds

Investors are buying new U.S. corporate bonds at a record pace, and demanding the smallest interest-rate premium to comparable government bonds since 2007.

imageDemand has also put sales of new junk-rated corporate bonds in the U.S. on pace to surpass last year’s record. Sales of investment-grade bonds in the U.S. this year are already at the highest ever, according to data provider Dealogic. (…)

The narrowest reading for investment-grade corporate-bond spreads in recent years came in 2005, when the gap hit 0.75 percentage point. (…)

According to Moody’s Investors Service, the default rate for below-investment-grade companies in the U.S. was 2.4% in November, down from 3.1% a year earlier. (…)

Meanwhile:

U.S. Rate Rise Sends High-Dividend Stocks Lower

The Dow Jones U.S. Select Dividend Index has lagged behind the Standard & Poor’s 500 Total Return Index by 4.6 percentage points on a total-return basis since April 30. During the same period, the yield on 10-year U.S. Treasuries has risen to 2.88 percent from 1.67 percent. The dividend group fell to its lowest level in more than a year Dec. 11 relative to the broader gauge.

BARRON’S COVER

An Upbeat View of 2014 Wall Street strategists expect stocks to rise 10%, boosted by a stronger economy and fatter corporate profits. Bullish on tech, industrials.

THE 10 STRATEGISTS Barron’s consulted about the outlook for 2014 have year-end targets for the S&P of 1900 to 2100, well above Friday’s close of 1775.32; their mean prediction is 1977.

(…) the strategists expect earnings growth to do the heavy lifting, with S&P profits climbing 9%, compared with subpar gains of 5% in the past few years.

Specifically, the strategists eye S&P profits of $118, up from this year’s estimated $108 to $109. Industry analysts typically have higher forecasts; their 2014 consensus is $122, according to Yardeni Research.

The consensus view is that yields on 10-year Treasury bonds will climb to 3.4% next year from a current 2.8%. Our panel’s predictions on year-end yields for the 10-year bond range widely, from 2.9% to 3.75%.

(…) corporations are sitting on $1 trillion of cash, and there is pent-up demand for investment around the world. Thomas Lee, the chief U.S. equity strategist at JPMorgan Chase, notes that U.S. gross fixed investment has fallen to 13% of GDP, on par with Greece and well below the 16% to 21% range that obtained from 1950 to 2007. Just getting back to the midpoint of that range would require additional spending of $600 billion, he observes. (…)

The calendar, too, is a help. Addition will come from subtraction as the U.S. begins to lap some of the government’s automatic spending cuts tied to the sequestration that began last spring, and the expiration of the Obama administration’s 2% payroll-tax cut early this year. The government cost the economy perhaps 1.5 percentage points of GDP growth in 2013, but “government drag will be a lot less in 2014,” predicts Auth.

Both people and companies will start to spend more in 2014, he adds.

How to be right, whatever happens;

Time to Brace for a 20% Correction Ned Davis Research expects a 2014 buying opportunity. How to play the decline-and-recovery scenario.

Davis: Right now, about 78% of industry groups are in healthy uptrends. That would have to fall to about 60% for us to say the market had lost upside momentum. We also focus on the Federal Reserve, and it’s still in a very easy mode, despite all the talk about tapering. So, those two indicators are bullish. However, we’ve looked at all the bear markets since 1956 and found seven associated with an inverted yield curve [in which short-term interest rates are higher than long ones] — a classic sign of Fed tightening. Those declines lasted well over a year and took the market down 34%, on average. Several other bear markets took place without an inverted yield curve, and the average loss there was about 19% in 143 market days. We don’t see an inverted yield curve anytime soon. So, whatever correction we get next year is more likely to be in the 20% range.

We also looked at midterm-election years — the second year of a presidential term, like the one coming up in 2014 — going back to 1934, and the average decline in those years was 21%. But after the low was hit in those years, the market, on average, gained 60% over two years. So, a correction should be followed by a great buying opportunity. (…)

Hedge Funds Underperform The S&P For The 5th Year In A Row

The $2.5 trillion hedge-fund industry is headed for its worst annual performance relative to U.S. stocks since at least 2005. As Bloomberg Brief reports, the funds returned 7.1% in 2013 through November; that’s 22 percentage points less than the 29.1% return of the S&P 500, with reinvested dividends, as markets rallied to records. Hedge funds are underperforming the benchmark U.S. index for the fifth year in a row as the Fed’s inexorable liquidity pushes equity markets higher (and the only way to outperform is throw every risk model out the window). Hedge funds (in aggregate) have underperformed the S&P 500 by 97 percentage points since the end of 2008.

Light bulb  Hence the new marketing stance:

“We are seeing a shift in how investors view hedge funds,” said Amy Bensted, head of hedge funds at Preqin. “Pre-2008, investors thought of them – and hedge funds marketed themselves – as a source of additional returns.

“Now, they are not seen just being for humungous, 20 per cent-plus returns, but for smaller, stable returns over many years.” (FT)

Winking smile  NEXT JOB FOR BERNANKE  China’s Smog Forces Pilots to Train for Blind Landings

 

NEW$ & VIEW$ (6 DECEMBER 2013)

Business Stockpiling Fuels 3.6% GDP Rise

The economy grew at a faster pace in the third quarter than first thought, but underlying figures suggest slower growth in the year’s final months.

catGross domestic product, the broadest measure of goods and services produced in the economy, grew at a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 3.6% from July through September, the Commerce Department said Thursday. The measure was revised up from an earlier 2.8% estimate and marks the strongest growth pace since the first quarter of 2012.

High five The upgrade was nearly entirely the result of businesses boosting their stockpiles. The change in private inventories, as measured in dollars, was the largest in 15 years after adjusting for inflation.

As a result, inventories are likely to build more slowly or decline in the current quarter, slowing overall economic growth. The forecasting firm Macroeconomic Advisers expects the economy to advance at a 1.4% rate in the fourth quarter. Other economists say the pace could fall below 1%.

Real final sales—GDP excluding the change in inventories—rose just 1.9%, a slowdown from the second quarter. Consumer spending advanced only 1.4%, the weakest gain since the recession ended.

This huge inventory bulge may explain the bullish manufacturing PMIs of the past few months as Lance Roberts writes today:

image

 

I posted on the apparent inventory overhang Wednesday, particularly at car manufacturers but also in retail stores as can be easily seen at any mall near you. Right on cue:

Honda Offers Dealers Incentives

Honda is offering its U.S. dealers big cash incentives to pump up their new-car sales in the final month of the year after its November U.S. sales fell slightly even as the overall market rose nearly 9%.

Honda told dealers on Wednesday it would pay bonuses of $3,000 for every vehicle they sell above their December 2012 sales total, according to dealers briefed by the company. Retailers can use the extra money to drop prices on new vehicles or finance other incentives to persuade customers to buy.

Auto makers often offer similar bonuses to their dealers, but Honda’s new program is noteworthy because the Japanese company typically offers much less in sales incentives than its competitors.

Honda’s program is being rolled out amid signs that other major auto makers in the U.S. also are sweetening rebates and other sales promotions.

Lance Roberts reminds us of the importance of final demand which is at really uncomfortably low levels:

Real final sales in the economy peaked in early 2012 and has since been on the decline despite the ongoing interventions of the Federal Reserve.  The lack of transmission into the real economy is clearly evident.

image

 

Furthermore, as shown in the next chart, consumer spending has continued to weaken since its peak in 2010.  The last couple of quarters has shown a noticeable decline is services related spending as budgets tighten due to lack of income growth as disposable personal incomes declined in the latest report.  The slowdown in dividends, wages and salaries were partially offset by a rise in social welfare and government benefits.  Unfortunately, rising incomes derived from government benefits does not lead to stronger economic growth.

image

 

The latest GDP data are for Q3. The last and most important quarter of the year is off to a slow pace:

Retailers Post Weak November Sales

The nine retailers tracked by Thomson Reuters recorded a 1.2% increase in November same-store sales, or sales at stores open at least a year, versus the 2.3% consensus estimate and the 5.1% increase posted a year ago.

The 1.2% result is the weakest result since September 2009’s 0.7% result.  Off-price retailers continue to outperform the sector, suggesting shoppers still want designer brand names for less. Companies that missed expectations blamed the shorter holiday season, very competitive and difficult environment.

Hopefully, this will help:

U.S. Crude-Oil Glut Spurs Price Drop

The U.S. Gulf Coast—home to the world’s largest concentration of petroleum refineries—is suddenly awash in crude oil. So much high-quality oil is flowing into the area that the price there has dropped sharply.

So much high-quality U.S. oil is flowing into the area that the price of crude there has dropped sharply in the past few weeks and is no longer in sync with global prices.

In fact, some experts believe a U.S. oil glut is coming. “We are moving toward a significant amount of domestic oversupply of light crude,” says Ed Morse, head of commodities research at Citigroup.

And the glut on the Gulf Coast is likely to grow. In January, the southern leg ofTransCanada Corp.’s Keystone pipeline is set to begin transporting 700,000 barrels a day of crude from the storage tanks of Cushing, Okla., to Port Arthur, Texas.

The ramifications could be far-reaching, including lower gasoline prices for American drivers, rising profits for refineries and growing political pressure on Congress to allow oil exports. But the glut could also hurt the very companies that helped create it: independent drillers, who have reversed years of declining U.S. energy production but face lower prices for their product.

Globally, the surge in supply and tumbling prices are attracting notice. On Monday, a delegate to the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries said Saudi Arabia is selling oil to the U.S. for less than it would fetch in Asia. Nonetheless, the Saudis have continued to ship crude to refineries they own in Texas and Louisiana, according to U.S. import data, further driving down prices.

The strongest indication of a glut is the falling price of “Louisiana Light Sweet,” a blend purchased by refiners along the Gulf Coast. Typically, a barrel of Louisiana Light Sweet costs a dollar or two more than a barrel of crude in Europe.

But on Wednesday, a barrel of Louisiana crude fetched $9.46 less than a barrel of comparable-quality crude in England. (…)

Some industry officials argue that U.S. light crude will simply displace more “heavy” imported oil. But many Gulf Coast refineries are set up to turn the more viscous crude into diesel fuel, and converting their facilities to process additional light oil wouldn’t be easy. (…)

San Antonio-based Valero, the nation’s largest oil refiner, all but stopped importing lightweight crude to the Gulf Coast and Memphis a year ago because there was so much U.S. product available, says spokesman Bill Day. It is also shipping crude from Texas and Louisiana all the way up to its refinery in Quebec because the price of Gulf Coast oil is so low. (…)

How about feeding New York City where prices are 17% higher than in Houston, Tx.? (Obama focuses agenda on relieving economic inequality) Winking smileBut this can’t help housing, even with the Fed trying as hard as it can:Neither can this:

While higher mortgage rates have moderated U.S. home sales recently, the potential supply of buyers has also taken a surprising step back. Annual household formations are running well below one-half million recently, compared with a three-decade norm of 1.1 million. This is surprising given that the echo boomers are old enough to leave the familial home by now—unless they simply can’t find work and feel compelled to stay there. (BMO Capital)

image

TOUGH TO BE CONSTRUCTIVE ABOUT EUROPE

However you look at it, the pattern is the same: strong and stronger Germany (20% of EU GDP, 16% of EU population), weak and weaker France (16%, 13%) and Italy (12%, 12%).

  • German construction sector growth helps drive economic expansion The construction industry looks set to provide a boost to the German economy in the fourth quarter, according to Markit’s PMI data. The construction PMI – which measures the overall level of business activity in the sector – registered expansion for the seventh successive month in November. Although the headline index dipped slightly from 52.6 in October to 52.1, the average reading in the fourth quarter so far is consistent with the sector’s output rising by some 7% compared to the third quarter.
  • France: Construction sector downturn deepens The downturn in France’s construction sector gathered pace in November. Activity and new orders both fell at sharper rates, while the pace of job shedding quickened. Confidence regarding the year-ahead outlook meanwhile plunged to the lowest in 2013 to date.
  • Italian construction sector set to post contraction in final quarter Italy’s construction sector looks set to remain a drag on GDP in the final quarter of the year, with businesses in the industry having recorded further reductions in total activity levels in both October and November. The latest contraction was the slowest in five months, but nevertheless still solid overall and broad based across the housing, commercial and civil engineering sectors.

German Factory Orders Decline in Sign of Uneven Recovery

Orders, adjusted for seasonal swings and inflation, slid 2.2 percent from September, when they rose a revised 3.1 percent, the Economy Ministry in Berlin said today. Economists forecast a decline of 1 percent, according to the median of 40 estimates in a Bloomberg survey. Orders advanced 1.9 percent from a year ago when adjusted for the number of working days.

Foreign orders fell 2.3 percent in October, while those from within the country dropped 2 percent, today’s report showed. Demand from the euro area declined 1.3 percent.

EURO BANKS NEED MORE WORKOUTS:

(Morgan Stanley)

Red heart Thank You All

I have not been able to personally and directly thank all of you who reacted to my help demand last Tuesday. While it was on a rather minor thing, I am relieved to see that if I ever lost my mind, my readers from across the world will surely help.

Your kind words were also nice to read. I am happy to see I can help some, me being first in line, remain focused, objective and disciplined.

I wish I had advised you to buy bitcoins early this year but you just paid me handsomely with your buddycoins!

Other harmless ways readers can contribute to this absolutely free blog is by clicking on the ads on the sidebar from time to time just to encourage my advertisers to stay with me and/or to use the Amazon search box on the sidebar to reach the Amazon web site before ordering. This will earn News-To-Use a small referral fee. All moneys received are reinvested into research material, less and less of which if free.