NEW$ & VIEW$ (3 FEBRUARY 2014)

Slow Income Growth Lurks as Threat to Consumer Spending A slowdown in U.S. income growth could short-circuit the surge in consumer spending that propelled the economic recovery in recent months.

As the holiday shopping season wrapped up, personal consumption rose a seasonally adjusted 0.4% in December from a month earlier, the Commerce Department said Friday. With a 0.6% increase in November, the final two months of 2013 marked the strongest consecutive gains since early 2012.

The upturn came while incomes were flat during the month. Real disposable income, which accounts for taxes and inflation, advanced just 0.7% during 2013. That was the weakest growth since the recession ended in 2009. (…)

Across 2013, the Commerce Department’s broad measure of spending on everything from haircuts to refrigerators was up 3.1% from the prior year. That was the weakest annual increase since 2009 and below the 4.1% growth seen in 2012.

But the pace of spending was substantially stronger in the final six months of last year. Economic growth in the second half of 2013 represented the best finish to a year in a decade. Consumer spending, which makes up more than two-thirds of the nation’s gross domestic product, was the primary driver. (…)

The personal saving rate fell to 3.9% in December from 4.3% in November. (…)

Friday’s report showed subdued inflation across the economy. The price index for personal consumption expenditures—the Fed’s preferred inflation gauge—rose 1.1% in December from a year earlier. While the strongest since August, the figure remains well below the central bank’s 2% inflation target. (…)

A separate Labor Department report Friday said employment costs in the last three months of 2013 were 2% higher than a year ago. Annual cost increases typically exceeded 3% before the 2007-09 downturn wiped out millions of jobs. (…) (Chart and table from Haver Analytics)

Try to see anything positive from the table. I suspect that spending data for the last few months of 2013 will be revised lower in coming months. In any event, the income side is desperately weak.imageLast 3 months of 2013:

  • Personal Income: +0.1%
  • Disposable Income: –0.2%
  • Real Disposable Income: –0.3%
  • Consumption Expenditures: +1.1%
  • Real Expenditures: +0.9%

Bloomberg Orange Book comments from retailers about January performances were mostly negative and suggest future weakness. Wal-Mart pared its sales forecast based on curtailment of the food stamp benefit program and other specialty apparel retailers issued statements of concern. (BloombergBriefs)

Makes you wonder about this Bloomberg article: Global Earnings Are Poised to Accelerate in 2014 as U.S. Consumers Spend More

Meanwhile:

China’s Manufacturing Activity Slows

The official manufacturing PMI fell to 50.5 in January, from 51.0 in December, the federation said. The January PMI was in line with the median forecast by economists in a Wall Street Journal poll. (…)

The new orders subindex dropped to 50.9 in January from 52.0 in December, and the subindex measuring new export orders declined to 49.3 from 49.8, the statement said.

The employment subindex dropped to 48.2 from 48.7, while the output subindex fell to 53.0 from 53.9. Mr. Zhang said the fall in the new orders subindex shows weakness in domestic demand.

The subindex measuring the operation of large firms of the official PMI, heavily weighted towards larger state-owned enterprises, dropped to 51.4 from 52.0, while the one measuring smaller firms fell to 47.1 from 47.7. (…)

The HSBC China Manufacturing PMI, which is tilted toward smaller companies, fell to a final reading of 49.5 in January from 50.5 in December, HSBC said Thursday.

In another sign of slower momentum among factory owners, profit at major Chinese industrial enterprises grew at a slower pace, expanding by 6% in December from the same month a year earlier to 942.53 billion yuan ($155.6 billion), a reduction from November’s 9.7% increase, official data released earlier in the week showed

Moscow casts doubt over Russian growth
GDP rose 1.3% in 2013 just missing government forecasts

Gross domestic product increased by 1.3 per cent in 2013, narrowly missing the government’s most recent forecast of 1.4 per cent, the Federal Statistics Service in its preliminary GDP estimate said on Friday. (…)

The economy ministry said while the economy was past its lowest point, it was unclear whether it could grow by 2.5 per cent this year as forecast earlier. Most banks and independent economists are more pessimistic than the government and estimate growth this year to stay well below 2 per cent. (…)

“In the first quarter, we expect growth on a level around 1 per cent. In the second quarter, growth will be higher, probably somewhere around 2 per cent or 1.5 per cent,” Andrei Klepach, Mr Ulyukayev’s deputy, said in remarks carried by Russian news agencies. “We can stick to our forecast of 2.5 per cent, although it is possible, if you take the current trends, that growth might be lower.”

However, the decline of the rouble, which has fallen to its lowest against the dollar in five years amid the recent emerging markets currency jitters, could alter that calculation, as a weaker currency makes its exports more competitive.

“In our view, a lower rouble rate is better for economic growth,” said Mr Klepach. “But it would be worse for both growth and inflation if there were bigger volatility.”

In a survey published last week, MNI, an affiliate of Deutsche, said the weakening rouble was helping Russian businesses and respondents were the most positive on exchange rate conditions in January since the survey began last March.

Materially Slower Spending Growth by Emerging Market Countries Will Be Felt

Emerging market economies are of increasing importance to mature economies, such as the US. For example, the share of US merchandise exports shipped to emerging markets has risen from 2003’s 44% to 2013’s prospective 55% of US merchandise exports. During the first 11 months of 2013, US exports to emerging markets grew by 4.6% annually, which compared most favorably to the -0.5% dip by exports to advanced economies.

image

The faster growth of US exports to emerging markets is consistent with 2013’s much faster 4.7% growth of the emerging market economies compared to the accompanying 1.3% growth of advanced economies. Moreover, this phenomenon is hardly new according to how the emerging markets outran mature economies for a 14th straight year in 2013. Since year-end 1999, the average annualized rates of real economic growth were 6.1% for the emerging markets and a sluggish 1.8% for the advanced economies. By contrast, during the 14-years-ended 1999, the 3.7% average annual growth rate of the emerging markets was much closer to the comparably measured 3.1% growth of the advanced economies. (Figure 1.)

imageEmerging markets are acutely sensitive to industrial commodity prices
Emerging market economies can suffer to the degree major central banks succeed at curbing product price inflation. Though it’s difficult to separate the chain of causation, the 0.74 correlation between the growth of Moody’s industrial metals price index and emerging market country economic growth is much stronger than the price index’s 0.28 correlation with the growth of advanced economies. In fact, the 0.74 correlation of emerging market country growth and the base metals price index is far stronger than the 0.19 correlation between the growth rates of emerging market and advanced economies.
According to the above approach, the percent change of Moody’s industrial metals price index is relative to the price index’s average of the previous three years. The recent industrial metals price index trailed its average of the previous three years by -8%. (Figure 2.)

The latest decline by industrial metals prices suggests that the emerging market economies will grow by less than the 5.1%, which the IMF recently projected for 2014. When the aforementioned version of the percent change for the industrial metals price index is above its 8.3% median of the last 34 years, the median yearly increase by emerging market economic growth is 5.9%. By contrast, when the base metals price index grows by less than 8.3% annually, the median annual increase for emerging market growth drops to 3.7%. (Moody’s)

As U.S. debates oil exports, long-term prices slump below $80 Long-term U.S. oil prices have slumped to record discounts versus Europe’s benchmark Brent, with some contracts dropping below $80 in a dramatic downturn that may intensify producers’ calls to ease a crude export ban.

imageOil for delivery in December 2016 has tumbled $3.50 a barrel in the first two weeks of the year, trading at just $79.45 on Friday afternoon, its lowest price since 2009. That is an unusually abrupt move for longer-dated contracts that are typically much less volatile than prompt crude. For most of last year, the contract traded in a narrow range on either side of $84 a barrel.

The shift in prices on either side of the Atlantic is even more dramatic further down the curve, with December 2019 U.S. crude now trading at a record discount versus the equivalent European Brent contract. The spread has doubled this month to nearly $15 a barrel, data show.

The drop in so-called “long-dated” U.S. oil futures extends a broad decline that has pushed prices as much as $15 lower in two years. It also coincided with an abrupt drop in near-term futures, which fell by nearly $9 a barrel in the opening weeks of 2014 amid signs of improving supply from Libya.

But while immediate prices have rebounded swiftly thanks to strong demand amid frigid winter weather and new pipelines that may drain Midwest stockpiles, longer-term contracts have not.

The unusual speed, severity and persistence of the decline has mystified many in the oil industry. Brokers, analysts and bankers have offered a range of possible explanations: a big one-off options trade in the Brent market; new-year hedging by U.S. oil producers; liquidation by bespoke fund investors; or even long-term speculation on a deepening domestic glut.

Regardless of the trigger, however, it may be cause for growing alarm for crude oil producers, who are increasingly concerned that falling prices will crimp profit margins if U.S. export constraints are not eased. Producers say this would hand over some of their rightful profits to refiners who can freely export gasoline and diesel at world prices. (…)

EARNINGS WATCH

Amid all the EM turmoil and the barometers of all kinds, let’s pause for a moment to take a look at the main ingredient, half way into the earnings season.

  • Factset provides its usual good rundown:

With 50% of the companies in the S&P 500 reporting actual results, the percentages of companies reporting earnings and sales above estimates are above the four-year averages.

imageOverall, 251 companies have reported earnings to date for the fourth quarter. Of these 251 companies, 74% have reported actual EPS above the mean EPS estimate and 26% have reported actual EPS below the mean EPS estimate. The percentage of companies reporting EPS above the mean EPS estimate is
above the 1-year (71%) average and the 4-year (73%) average.

In aggregate, companies are reporting earnings that are 3.6% above expectations. This surprise percentage is above the 1-year (3.3%) average but below the 4-year (5.8%) average.

The blended earnings growth rate for the fourth quarter is 7.9% this week, above last week’s blended earnings growth rate of 6.3%. Upside earnings surprises reported by companies in multiple sectors were responsible for the increase in the overall earnings growth rate this week. Eight of the ten sectors recorded an increase in earnings growth rates during the week, led by the Materials sector.

The Financials sector has the highest earnings growth rate (23.7%) of all ten sectors. It is also the largest contributor to earnings growth for the entire index. If the Financials sector is excluded, the earnings growth rate for the S&P 500 falls to 4.9%.

In terms of revenues, 67% of companies have reported actual sales above estimated sales and 33% have reported actual sales below estimated sales. The percentage of companies reporting sales above estimates is above the average percentage recorded over the last four quarters (54%) and above the average percentage recorded over the previous four years (59%).

In aggregate, companies are reporting sales that are 0.1% below expectations. This percentage is below the 1-year (0.4%) average and below the 4-year (0.6%) average.

The blended revenue growth rate for Q4 2013 is 0.8%, above the growth rate of 0.3% at the end of the quarter (December 31). Eight of the ten sectors are reporting revenue growth for the quarter, led by the Health Care and Information Technology sectors. The Financials sector is reporting the lowest revenue growth for the quarter.

At this point in time, 54 companies in the index have issued EPS guidance for the first quarter. Of these 54 companies, 44 have issued negative EPS guidance and 10 have issued positive EPS guidance. Thus, the percentage of companies issuing negative EPS guidance to date for the first quarter is 81% (44 out of 54). This percentage is above the 5-year average of 64%, but slightly below the percentage at this same point in time for Q4 2013 (84%).

image

For Q1 2014, analysts are expecting earnings growth of 2.2%. However, earnings growth is projected to improve in each subsequent quarter for the remainder of the year. For Q2 2014, Q3 2014, and Q4 2014, analysts are predicting earnings growth rates of 8.5%, 12.4%, and 11.9%. For all of 2014, the projected earnings growth rate is 9.6%.

Note that the 2.2% growth rate expected for Q1’14 is down from 4.3% on Dec. 31. The 9.6% growth rate for all of 2014 is down from 10.6% on Dec. 31.

Pointing up Data can vary depending on which aggregator one uses. Factset’s reports are the most complete but the official data still come from S&P.

  • Half way into the season, S&P’s tally shows a 69% beat rate and a 20% miss rate.

Importantly, Q4’13 estimates rose from $28.77 On Jan. 23 to $29.23 on Jan. 30. S&P also detailed the impact of two large pension adjustments at AT&T and Verizon: their gains added $0.94 to the Q4’13 operating EPS while they cost the Index $1.26 in Q4’12. Taking these out, just for growth calculation, Q4’14 EPS would be up 16% YoY if the remaining 250 companies meet estimates, up from +12.2% in Q3 and +3.7% in Q2. The economic acceleration is thus translating into faster profit growth and still rising margins.

We should keep in mind, however, that easy comparisons account for a big part of the strong earnings growth. Comparisons are particularly easy for three companies – Bank of America, Verizon, and Travelers. Exclude these three companies and total earnings growth for the S&P 500 companies that have reported drops to +6% from +12.0%.

Nonetheless, Zack acknowledges that if remaining companies meet estimates

Total earnings in Q4 would be up +9.6% on +0.7% higher revenues and 79 basis points higher margins. This is a much better earnings growth picture at this stage of the reporting cycle than we have seen in recent quarters. In fact, +9.6% growth is the highest quarterly earnings growth rate of 2013.

Zacks provides another useful peek at earnings trends with actual dollar earnings instead of per share earnings.

image

Trailing 12m EPS are now seen reaching $108.28 after Q4’13 (+5.9% QoQ) and $110.64 after Q1’14, assuming Q1 estimates of $28.13 (+9.2%) are met. They have been shaved 0.6% in the last week.

  • The Rule of 20 P/E barometer, a far more useful barometer than the January barometer, has retreated back into the “lower risk” area at 18.2x, down from 19.7x in December 2013. This is the third time in this bull market that the Rule of 20 P/E (actual P/E on trailing EPS + inflation) has refused to cross the “20 fair value” line after a rising run, a rare phenomenon that last occurred in the early 1960s. image

In all the media frenzy about the recent equity markets setbacks, the U.S. earnings trend should take center stage. Rising earnings remain the main fuel for bull markets, over and above QEs of all kinds. Notice the sharp uptrend yellow line in the chart above. This line plots where the fair value of the S&P 500 Index based on the Rule of 20. In effect, it is derived from multiplying trailing 12m EPS by (20 minus inflation) or 18.3 at present using core CPI. It is the difference between the yellow line and the actual S&P 500 Index (blue line) that is measured by the thick black line (actual P/E + inflation).

Deep undervaluation is reached when the thick black line, the Rule of 20 barometer, is below 17.5 (historical lows around 15). Extrapolating 3 months down with trailing EPS at $110.64, the Rule of 20 P/E would be 17.8x if the Index remains at 1782 and inflation is stable at 1.7%. This would dictate a fair value of 2025 on the Index, +13.6% from current levels. On the other side, a decline in the Rule of 20 P/E to the 15-16x range would take the Index down 11-17% to 1470-1580. Taking the mid-point downside risk of 14%, the upside/downside is nearly identical, not a compelling risk/reward ratio to increase equity exposure just yet.

The S&P 500 Index is now sitting on its 100 day m.a.. It has held there four times since June 2013. The 200 day m.a. is at 1705 and is still rising. At 1700, the Rule of 20 P/E would be 17.1x. At that point, upside to fair value would be 19% and downside to the 15.5x level would be 10%. Unless the economic picture, or inflation, change markedly between now and the end of April, I consider the 200 day m.a. to be the worst case scenario in the market turmoil.

Eurozone Bank Earnings Weigh On Stocks

Banks saw the heaviest losses, with poorly-received updates from Lloyds Banking Group andJulius Baer dragging on the sector.

Data showing a faster-than-expected expansion in euro-zone manufacturing in January did little to lighten the mood, as investors focused on the latest disappointments in a downbeat earnings season.

SENTIMENT WATCH

Not since the early summer of that year has the S&P 500 experienced a standard correction of at least 10 per cent. This type of pullback, like a gardener pruning roses in late winter in order to encourage healthy growth in the spring, is what many professional investors would like to see this year.Red rose (…)

Surprised smile Alhambra Investment Partners this week said not only has margin debt hit a record, there has been a massive rise in overall leverage. (…) The firm estimates that total margin debt usage last year jumped by an almost incomprehensible $123bn, while cash balances declined by $19bn. “This $142bn leveraged bet on stocks surpasses any 12-month period in history.” (…)

A torrent of margin calls and larger ETF outflows can easily feed on itself and may well prompt a far stronger corrective slide in stocks than investors expect. Wilted rose

 Ghost Trader’s Almanac -  every down January on the S&P 500 since 1938, without exception, has preceded a new or extended bear market, a 10% correction, or a flat year.

  • Fingers crossed Most Expect Stock Turmoil to Pass A spate of bumpy, uncertain trading has knocked the Dow Jones Industrial Average down 5.3% from its Dec. 31 record. It is threatening to hang around for a while, many money managers say. The big question is how much worse it could get. The widespread belief is, not much.

    Get used to it.

    A spate of bumpy, uncertain trading has knocked the Dow Jones Industrial Average down 5.3% from its Dec. 31 record. It is threatening to hang around for a while, many money managers say. The big question is how much worse it could get.

There is just about everything in this last WSJ piece…and just about nothing with any substance.

ANOTHER BAROMETER…

If you are of the statistical type, you should buy the Stock Trader’s Almanac and drown yourself in numbers and, often, stupidity. Here’s the Decennial Cycle from Lance Roberts, to help you keep the faith ;

There is another piece of historical statistical data that supports the idea of a market “melt up” before the next big correction in 2016 which is the decennial cycle. 

The decennial cycle, or decennial pattern as it is sometimes referred to, is an important one. It takes into account the stock market performance in years ending in 1,2,3 etc. In other words, since we just finished up 2013 that was the third year of this decade. This is shown in the table below.

decennial-cycle-011414

This year, 2014, represents the fourth year of the current decade and has a decent track record. The markets have been positive 12 out of 18 times in the 4th year of the decade with an average return for the Dow Jones Industrial Average since 1835 of 5.08%. Therefore, there is a 66% probability that the end will end positively; however, that does not exclude the possibility of a sharp dip somewhere along the way.

Open-mouthed smile However, looking ahead to 2015 is where things get interesting.  The decennial pattern is certainly suggesting that we take advantage of any major correction in 2014 to do some buying ahead of 2015.  As shown in the chart above, there is a very high probability (83%) that the 5th year of the decade will be positive with an average historical return of 21.47%. 

The return of the positive years is also quite amazing with 10 out of the 15 positive 5th years (66%) rising 20% or more.  However, 2015 will also likely mark the peak of the cyclical bull market as economic tailwinds fade and the reality of an excessively stretched valuation and price metrics become a major issue.

As you will notice, returns in the 6th and 7th years (2016-17) become substantially worse with a potential of negative return years rising.  The chart below shows the win/loss ratio of each year of the decennial cycle.

Decennial-cycle-011414-2

AND MORE ON THE JANUARY BAROMETER

OK, this will be the end of it. Promise. But I thought it was relevant and, I must admit, a little interesting. Cyniconomics introduces the “JAJO EFFECT”:

Our argument begins with four observations (we’ll get to theories in a moment):

  1. Market sentiment often changes during the earnings reporting season – in which most of the action occurs in the first month of the quarter – and these sentiment shifts tend to persist.
  2. Individual investors tend to pay extra attention to their positions early in a quarter, reacting to the past quarter’s results and then looking ahead to the next performance period.
  3. Professional money managers often refine their strategies prior to client reviews or board meetings, which typically occur after results for the prior quarter become available.
  4. Investors (individuals and professionals) are even more likely to rethink strategy in January, partly because it marks a new annual reporting period but also because it tends to be a time for planning and reflection. (How are you doing on those resolutions, by the way?)

These observations are admittedly vague, but we suspect they’re relevant to stock performance. They suggest that the first month of a quarter may set the market’s tone in subsequent months. In the context of today’s markets, they tie into a few questions you may be asking about early 2014 volatility:  Is January’s market drop merely noise on the way to another string of all-time highs, or is there more to it than that? For instance, doesn’t it seem a little ominous that we stumbled out of the gates this year despite sentiment being rampantly bullish? Does this tell us to be cautious going forward?

If you happen to read the Stock Trader’s Almanac, you’ll connect our questions to the “January barometer” (…). The Almanac’s founder, Yale Hirsch, coined the term in 1972 when he presented research showing that January’s return is a decent predictor of full-year returns. He concluded: “As January goes, so goes the year.”

We’ll take a closer look at the January barometer below, while testing two variations drawn from the observations above.

“Downsizing” the January barometer

First, we doubt that any carryover of January’s performance is likely to persist for an entire calendar year. Based on the idea that quarterly reporting cycles may have something to do with these types of anomalies, it doesn’t seem right to think that January’s events should still be relevant near the year’s end.  The first month of a quarter may offer clues about the next quarter or two, but probably not three or four quarters later after investors have shifted focus to subsequent corporate earnings and investment performance reports.

In fact, even without quarterly reporting cycles, you may still question why January would continue to be a “barometer” by the third or fourth quarter.  You may expect to find lower correlations of January returns with the year’s second half than with the first half, and this is exactly what we see:

jajo effect 1

Note that the 33% correlation for the “downsized” January barometer is very high for these types of relationships. It’s comfortably significant based on traditional tests (the F-stat is 8.2).  By comparison, the correlation of January’s return with the 11 months from February to December is still high at 28% but less significant (the F-stat falls to 5.1).

Here’s a scatter plot and trendline for the year-by-year results:

jajo effect 2

The chart shows that 54% of the years with negative January returns included negative returns from February to June (13 of 24), while only 9% of the years with positive January returns were followed by negative February to June returns (8 of 60). In other words, the probability of a down market between February and June was six times higher after a down market in January.

Do years or quarters hold the key to the calendar?

Second, we considered whether April, July and October also qualify as barometers, based on our speculation that the January barometer is partly explained by quarterly phenomena.

In particular, we calculated correlations with subsequent returns for all 12 months to see if the beginning-of-quarter months stand out:

jajo effect 3

Needless to say, the correlations fit the hypothesis, with the four highest belonging to January, April, July and October. The odds of this happening in a purely random market are nearly 500 to 1. Call it the “JAJO effect.”

(…) If stocks don’t recover strongly by month’s end – say, back to the S&P 500′s 2013 close of 1848.36 – the odds favor continued weakness. As January goes, so goes the first half of the year.

 M&A — Best Start to Year Since 2011

Companies and funds inked $228.2 billion worth of acquisitions this month, the highest volume of activity since 2011, according to Thomson Reuters. (…)

Deal making volume is up 85% from January 2013 when all three indexes wrapped up January with gains between 4% and 6%. Yet all that could change quickly, and a big start to the year doesn’t necessarily translate into a big year for M&A.

By mid-February 2013, it looked like M&A was back in a big way — $40 billion worth of deals were announced on one day that month. Despite a 30% plus pop in stock indexes in 2013, M&A activity ended the year far below the pre-crisis peak years.

Still a big difference so far in 2014 is that overall deal making has been wide and deep — crossing industries and regions. Many of the big deals have been corporations buying up other corporations, and the stock market has mostly applauded buyers for making deals. (…)

The winning banks so far? Morgan Stanley takes the top spot for announced global M&A. Credit Suisse is right behind Morgan Stanley. The bank served as an adviser to Lenovo on both of its $2 billion plus bids for U.S. companies in the past two weeks – Motorola Mobility and IBM‘s low-end server business.  Behind them: Goldman Sachs, Bank of America, Deutsche Bank and then Citi. J.P. Morgan, typically a powerhouse deal maker, is in the 10th spot.

 
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NEW$ & VIEW$ (15 JANUARY 2014)

Consumers Spent Solidly in December

Just kidding This is the WSJ’s headline today. Below is the reality:

U.S. Retail Sales Post Moderate Year-End Increase

Retail spending increased 0.2% (4.1% y/y) during December after a 0.4% November gain, revised down from 0.7%. For all of last year retail sales increased 4.3%, the weakest increase of the economic recovery.

A 1.8% reduction (+5.9% y/y) in sales of motor vehicles & parts held back the increase in overall December sales. Nonauto retail sales rose 0.7% (3.7% y/y) after a 0.1% November uptick. Nonauto sales rose 3.4% during all of 2013, also the weakest gain of the recovery.

Higher sales of food & beverages led last month’s sales with a 2.0% gain (4.2% y/y) following two months of slippage. Clothing & accessory sales increased 1.8% (5.2% y/y) after a 0.5% November dip and gasoline service station sales rose 1.6% (0.6% y/y), after two months of decline. Sales of nonstore retailers showed continued strength with a 1.4% jump (9.9% y/y) following a 1.6% November gain. Furniture store sales dropped 0.4% (+4.5% y/y) after a 0.2% decline and building materials & garden equipment store sales slipped 0.4% (+2.1% y/y), down for the third month in the last five.

Not easy to get a clear measure of retail sales given the calendar quirks and bad weather. It is best to look at average sales growth for November and December.

  • Total retail sales: +0.3% (Nov.-Dec. avg) vs +0.5% in October.
  • Autos and Parts:  +0.1% vs +1.0%.
  • Non Autos ex Gas and Building Supplies: +0.5% vs +0.6%

Surprised smile Total sales for the October through December 2013 period were up 1.0% YoY.

Note that these figures are subject to big revisions. November’s surprising 0.7% original gain was revised down to 0.4%.

Pointing up U.S. Business Inventories Increase Slows

Total business inventories increased 0.4% in November (4.0% y/y), the slowest increase in three months. This inventory rise accompanied a 0.8% jump (4.0% y/y) in business sales after October’s 0.5% increase. As a result, the inventory-to-sales ratio remained at 1.29, where it’s been since April.

Pointing up In the retail sector, inventories advanced 0.8% (7.3% y/y) in November, including a 1.3% jump (13.7% y/y) in motor vehicles. Inventories excluding autos rose 0.6% (4.4% y/y).

Sad smile Taking the 3 months to November, retail inventories rose 2.9% sequentially while sales advanced only 0.7%. Ex-Autos: +1.3% vs +0.5%.

As I have been warning, there is clearly an inventory problem entering Q114. If you don’t believe me, read this:

Auto AutoNation CEO Calls U.S. Vehicle Inventories Too High

AutoNation Chief Executive Mike Jackson says new-car supplies in the U.S. are rising rapidly, putting pressure on auto companies as they try to avoid a profit-sapping price war.

(…) U.S. dealers have about $100 billion worth of unsold cars and trucks sitting on their lots, Mr. Jackson said. That level is striking given that car makers have pledged not to overstock dealers the way they did in the run-up to the financial crisis and the auto-sales collapse of 2008-2009, Mr. Jackson said. Auto makers book revenue when a car is shipped, not when it is sold at the dealership.

At the end of 2013, auto dealers had 3.45 million cars and trucks in stock, enough to last 63 days at the current selling rate, according to research firm Autodata Corp. A 60-day supply of cars is typically considered as healthy by the industry.

High five But Mr. Jackson said the inventory levels are much higher than that—closer to 90 to 120 days of supply—if cars sold to fleets are excluded from the selling rate. (…)

AutoNation’s Mr. Jackson said discounts are starting to rise across the industry already, even if they aren’t as obvious to consumers.

Among them are “stair-step programs” where car companies give money directly to dealers in exchange for hitting monthly sales targets.

“What worries me is if the industry was as disciplined as it says it is we would have stopped before 3.5 million” vehicles at dealerships, Mr. Jackson said. He sees about a 50-50 chance the industry will resort to an all-out discount war.

“What I’m saying is you’re on the edge of a slippery slope and even sliding down it a bit,” he said. “It’s a risk.”

Auto Makers Dare to Boost Output

A string of new factories in the region will start cranking out a million or more cars over the next several years.

A large increase in production capacity poses a serious risk for auto makers. They reap strong profits if their factories are running near 100% of capacity, but their losses mount rapidly if the utilization rate falls below 80%. (…)

Some auto makers are already concerned about overcapacity.

“The last thing we need is to get bricks-and-mortar capacity increased,” Sergio Marchionne, chief executive of Chrysler Group LLC and Fiat SpA, said this week. Building new plants isn’t the only trend to watch, he added, because increasing the use of automated production lines can boost output at existing factories. (…)

Magna warns 2014 sales likely below analysts’ estimates

Canadian auto-parts giant Magna International Inc. is forecasting 2014 sales that are below analysts’ estimates.

Aurora, Ont.-based Magna said on Wednesday in its financial outlook that it anticipates total sales of between $33.8-billion (U.S.) and $35.5-billion in 2014, lower than the consensus analysts’ estimate of $35.8-billion.

Jobs Deal Collapses in Senate

(…) After more than a week of talks, lawmakers failed to reach agreement to revive benefits for the roughly 1.4 million people who have lost aid since last month. Senate Democrats rejected the latest proposal from a group of eight Republicans, while GOP lawmakers dismissed an overture from Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.) to allow votes on a handful of Republican amendments.

The law that expired in December dates from the financial crisis and provided federal aid to supplement the 26 weeks of unemployment benefits provided by most states, giving up to 47 weeks of additional payments. The latest proposals from both Democrats and Republicans would scale that back to a maximum of 31 weeks. (…)

Several lawmakers said they hope to continue negotiations, but the Senate isn’t expected to return to the issue until late January after next week’s congressional recess. The Senate is shifting its focus on Wednesday to consider the short-term stopgap spending bill to prevent a partial government shutdown and the $1.012 trillion bill to fund the federal government through Sept. 30, the end of the current fiscal year. (…)

HOUSING WATCH

From Raymond James:

  • California’s November existing single-family home sales fell 3.4%, on a seasonally-adjusted basis relative to October as rising home prices and higher mortgage rates reduced affordability. Closed sales stood at the lowest level since July 2010, falling to an annual run rate of 387,520 units (down 12.0% y/y). We note on a sequential basis, sales fell for the fourth consecutive month in November and have now declined on a year-over-year basis in ten of the last eleven months. California’s non-seasonally-adjusted pending home sales index (PHSI) fell 9.4% y/y (versus -10.4% y/y in October), and declined 13.6% m/m as Golden State buyers’ sensitivity to interest rate swings becomes increasingly apparent.
  • Florida existing home sales fell 1.2% y/y in November, the first negative y/y comp since March 2012 and down from a +6.5% y/y comp in October. Sequentially, sales decreased 11.3% from October, fueled by the combined increase in prices and mortgage rates outpacing household income growth. According to November data from RealtyTrac, 62.7% of Florida homes sold were all-cash transactions, the highest level of any state and well ahead of the next closest state (Georgia, 51.3%).

German GDP Disappoints

German economic growth failed to gain momentum in the fourth quarter of 2013, but economists predict stronger growth this year

Germany’s gross domestic product expanded 0.4% in 2013, following growth of 0.7% in 2012, the Federal Statistics Office said on Wednesday. The economy grew 0.5% when taking account of the number of working days each year.

Based on the full-year figures, GDP increased around 0.25% in the three months through December—about the same rate as the third quarter—according to the statistics office, which is due to publish fourth-quarter national accounts in mid-February.

Productivity crisis haunts global economy
Report shows most countries failed to improve overall efficiency

A productivity crisis is stalking the global economy with most countries failing last year to improve their overall efficiency for the first time in decades.

In a sign that innovation might be stalling in the face of weak demand, the Conference Board, a think-tank, said a “dramatic” result of the 2013 figures was a decline in the world’s ability to turn labour and capital resources into goods and services.

Productivity growth is the most important ingredient for raising prosperity in rich and poor countries alike. If overall productivity growth disappears in the years ahead, it will dash hopes that rich countries can improve their population’s living standards and that emerging economies can catch up with the advanced world.

The Conference Board said: “This stalling appears to be the result of slowing demand in recent years, which caused a drop in productive use of resources that is possibly related to a combination of market rigidities and stagnating innovation.”

The failure of overall efficiency – known to economists as total factor productivity – to grow in 2013 results from slower economic growth in emerging economies alongside continued rapid increases in capital used and labour inputs. Labour productivity growth also slowed for the third consecutive year.

The decline in total factor productivity continues a trend of recent years in which the remarkable rise in the efficiency of emerging markets has slowed and in advanced economies it has declined. (…)

The Conference Board’s annual analysis of productivity uses the latest data to estimate economic growth in all countries, the increase in hours worked and the deployment of additional capital to estimate the efficiency of individual economies.

Globally, it found that labour productivity growth declined from 1.8 per cent in 2012 to 1.7 per cent in 2013, having been as high as 3.9 per cent in 2010. Total factor productivity dipped 0.1 per cent.

For the US it found that productivity gains of the early years of the crisis continued to be elusive in 2013, with labour productivity growth stable at 0.9 per cent in 2013.

The US trends were, however, better than those in Europe, which has seen extremely weak productivity growth alongside relatively muted unemployment in most large economies with the exception of Spain, where joblessness soared. Labour productivity grew 0.4 per cent in 2013, having fallen 0.1 per cent in 2012.

Mr van Ark said Europe’s problem in achieving more efficiency from its labour force stemmed from structural rigidities.(…)

Emerging economies saw rates of growth of productivity fall from extraordinarily rapid rates, even though the rate of growth at 3.3 per cent was still much higher than in advanced economies.

For China, the Conference Board said that, while “the statistical information for the latest years is sketchy, the indications are that sustained investment growth in China has not been accompanied by the efficiency gains (measured by total factor productivity growth) similar to those of the previous decade”. (…)

World Bank warns of emerging market risk
Capital flows could fall 80% if central banks move too abruptly

An abrupt unwinding of central bank support for advanced world economies could cause capital flows to emerging markets to contract by as much as 80 per cent, inflicting significant economic damage and throwing some countries into crises, the World Bank has warned.

Capital flows into emerging markets are influenced more by global than domestic forces, leaving them vulnerable to disorderly changes in policy by the US Federal Reserve, concludes a study by World Bank economists.

SENTIMENT WATCH

 

The Year-Two Curse

In a world full of January barometers, Super Bowl indicators and sell-in-May-and-go mantras, Jeffrey Kleintop, chief market strategist at LPL Financial, thinks he’s found an indicator that actually works: the “year-two curse.”

“Year two” refers to the second year of a presidential cycle, which is what we’re in right now. Per the chart below, courtesy of LPL, the middle of the year tends to be fairly volatile for investors.

“The start of the second quarter to the end of the third quarter of year two has consistently marked the biggest peak-to-trough decline of any year of the four-year presidential term,” Mr. Kleintop wrote in a note to clients.Since 1960, nine of the 13 presidential terms have suffered from the dreaded curse, as the S&P 500 fell in the second and third quarters of those years, he says. (…)

Still, Mr. Kleintop maintains a relatively bullish stance about the rest of the year. “We may again see some seasonal weakness, but there is no need to fear the curse,” he says. “In fact, the curse may be a blessing for some, allowing those who have been awaiting a long-overdue pullback a chance to buy. It is important to keep in mind that history shows that, on average, year two posts a solid gain for stocks, and the year-two curse is reversed by the end of the year.”

 
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NEW$ & VIEW$ (8 JANUARY 2014)

Companies in U.S. Added 238,000 Jobs in December, ADP Says

The 238,000 increase in employment was the biggest since November 2012 and followed a revised 229,000 gain in November that was stronger than initially estimated, according to the ADP Research Institute in Roseland, New Jersey. The December tally exceeded the most optimistic forecast in a Bloomberg survey in which the median projection called for a 200,000 advance.

Discounts drive U.S. holiday retail growth: ShopperTrak

Promotions and discounts offered by U.S. retailers drove a 2.7 percent rise in holiday season sales despite six fewer days and a cold snap that kept shoppers from stores, retail industry tracker ShopperTrak said. (…)

U.S. online retail spending rose 10 percent to $46.5 billion in the November-December 2013 holiday season, according to comScore (SCOR.O). This was below the 14 percent growth that the data firm had forecast.

ShopperTrak said shoppers spent $265.9 billion during the latest holiday period. The increase was slightly ahead of the 2.4 percent jump it had forecast in September.

ShopperTrak had forecast a 1.4 percent decline in shopper traffic.

Both retail sales and foot traffic rose 2.5 percent in the 2012 holiday season. (…)

ShopperTrak estimated on Wednesday that U.S. retail sales would rise 2.8 percent in the first quarter of 2014, while shopper traffic would fall 9 percent.

Growth Picture Brightens as Exports Hit Record

A booming U.S. energy sector and rising overseas demand brightened the nation’s trade picture in November, sharply boosting estimates for economic growth in late 2013 and raising hopes for a stronger expansion this year.

U.S. exports rose to their highest level on record in November, a seasonally adjusted $194.86 billion, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. A drop in imports narrowed the trade gap to $34.25 billion, the smallest since late 2009.

Pointing up The trade figures led many economists to sharply raise their forecasts for economic growth in the final quarter. Morgan Stanley economists raised their estimate to an annualized 3.3% from an earlier forecast of a 2.4% pace. Macroeconomic Advisers boosted its fourth-quarter projection to a 3.5% rate from 2.6%.

Fourth-quarter growth at that pace, following a 4.1% annualized increase in the third quarter, would mark the fastest half-year growth stretch since the fourth quarter of 2011 and the first quarter of 2012.

The falling U.S. trade deficit in large part reflects rising domestic energy production. U.S. crude output has increased about 64% from five years ago, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

At the same time, the U.S.’s thirst for petroleum fuels has stalled as vehicles become more efficient. As a result, refiners are shipping increasing quantities of diesel, gasoline and jet fuel to Europe and Latin America.

Petroleum exports, not adjusted for inflation, rose to the highest level on record in November while imports fell to the lowest level since November 2010.

If recent trade trends continue, Mr. Bryson said net exports could add one percentage point to the pace of GDP growth in the fourth quarter. That would be the biggest contribution since the final quarter of 2010.

Rising domestic energy production also helps in other ways, by creating jobs, keeping a lid on gasoline costs and lowering production costs for energy-intensive firms. As a result, consumers have more to spend elsewhere and businesses are more competitive internationally. (…)

U.S. exports are up 5.2% from a year earlier, led by rising sales to China, Mexico and Canada. U.S. exports to China from January through November rose 8.7% compared with the same period a year earlier. Exports to Canada, the nation’s largest trading partner, were up 2.5% in the same period. (…)

US inflation expectations hit 4-month high
Sales of Treasury inflation protected securities rise

Inflation expectations, as measured by the difference between yields on 10-year nominal Treasury notes and Treasury inflation protected securities (Tips), have risen to 2.25 per cent from a low of around 2.10 a month ago.

Aging Boomers to Boost Demand for Apartments, Condos and Townhouses

 

(…) As the boomers get older, many will move out of the houses where they raised families and move into cozier apartments, condominiums and townhouses (known as multifamily units in industry argot). A normal transition for individuals, but a huge shift in the country’s housing demand.

Based on demographic trends, the country should see a stronger rebound in multifamily construction than in single-family construction, Kansas City Fed senior economist Jordan Rappaport wrote in the most recent issue of the bank’s Economic Review. (Though he also notes slowing U.S. population growth “will put significant downward pressure on both single-family and multifamily construction.”)

Construction of multifamily buildings is expected to pick up strongly by early 2014, and single-family-home construction should regain strength by early 2015. “The longer term outlook is especially positive for multifamily construction, reflecting the aging of the baby boomers and an associated shift in demand from single-family to multifamily housing. By the end of the decade, multifamily construction is likely to peak at a level nearly two-thirds higher than its highest annual level during the 1990s and 2000s,” Mr. Rappaport wrote.

In contrast, when construction of single-family homes peaks at the end of the decade or beginning of the 2020s, he wrote, it’ll be “at a level comparable to what prevailed just prior to the housing boom.” (…)

“More generally,” Mr. Rappaport wrote, “the projected shift from single-family to multifamily living will likely have many large, long-lasting effects on the U.S. economy. It will put downward pressure on single-family relative to multifamily house prices. It will shift consumer demand away from goods and services that complement large indoor space and a backyard toward goods and services more oriented toward living in an apartment. Similarly, the possible shift toward city living may dampen demand for automobiles, highways, and gasoline but increase demand for restaurants, city parks, and high-quality public transit. Households, firms, and governments that correctly anticipate these changes are likely to especially benefit.”

Euro-Zone Retail Sales Surge

A surprise jump in retail sales across the euro zone boosts hopes that consumers may aid the hoped-for recovery.

The European Union’s statistics agency Wednesday said retail sales rose by 1.4% from October and were 1.6% higher than in November 2012. That was the largest rise in a single month since November 2001, and a major surprise. Nine economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal last week had expected sales to rise by just 0.1%.

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The pickup was spread across the currency area, with sales up 1.5% in low-unemployment Germany, but up an even stronger 2.1% in France, where the unemployment rate is much higher and the economy weaker.

The rise in sales was also broadly based across different products, with sales of food and drink up 1.1% from October, while sales of other items were up 1.9%.

The surge in sales during November follows a long period of weakness, with sales having fallen in September and October. Consumer spending rose by just 0.1% on the quarter in the three months to September, having increased by a slightly less feeble 0.2% in the three months to June.

High five Let’s not get carried away. Sales often rebound after two weak months. Taking the last 3 months to November, totals sales rose only 0.4% or 1.6% annualized, only slightly better than the 0.8% annualized gain in the previous 3 months. Core sales did a little better with  annualized gains of 3.6% and 0.4% for the same respective periods. The most recent numbers can be revised, however.image

Markit’s Retail PMI for December was not conducive to much hoopla!

Markit’s final batch of eurozone retail PMI® data for 2013 signalled an overall decline in sales for the fourth month running. The rate of decline remained modest but accelerated slightly, reflecting a sharper contraction in France and slower growth in Germany.

Record-Low Core Inflation May Soon Push ECB to Ease Policy (Bloomberg Briefs)image

Meanwhile:

image

 

Auto U.K. Car Sales Top Pre-Crisis Levels

U.K. registrations of new cars rose 11% in 2013 to their highest level since before the 2008 financial crisis, reflecting the country’s relatively strong economic recovery in contrast with the rest of Europe, where car demand has revived only recently from a prolonged slump.

The outlook is nonetheless for more sedate growth in the U.K. this year and next as the impact of pent-up demand for new cars fades, the U.K. Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, or SMMT, said on Tuesday.

Much of the increase in sales last year stemmed from the generous provision of cheap financing from the car manufacturers.

The SMMT said registrations, which mirror sales, rose to 2.26 million vehicles from 2.04 million in 2012, with registrations in December jumping 24% to 152,918, a 22nd consecutive monthly rise.

As a result, the U.K. has entrenched its position as Europe’s biggest car market after Germany and ahead of France. Germany registrations of new cars fell 4.2% to 2.95 million in 2013, despite a 5.4% gain in December. French registrations fell 5.7% last year to 1.79 million cars, although they rose 9.4% in December. The German and French data were released by the countries’ auto-making associations last week. (…)

Eurozone periphery borrowing costs fall
Yields in Spain, Portugal and Greece down after Irish bond sale

(…) The strength of demand for eurozone “periphery” debt reflected increased investor appetite for higher-yielding government bonds as well as rising confidence in the creditworthiness of eurozone economies. It improved significantly the chances of Portugal following Ireland’s example and exiting its bailout programme later this year – and of Greece also soon being able to tap international debt markets. (…)

EARNINGS WATCH

Currency Swings Hit Earnings Currency swings are still taking a toll on corporate earnings despite efforts to manage the risk. Large U.S. multinational companies reported about $4.2 billion in hits to earnings and revenue in Q3, driven mostly by swings in the Brazilian real, Japanese yen, Indian rupee and Australian dollar, CFOJ’s Emily Chasan reports. The real declined 10% against the U.S. dollar during the quarter, while the rupee hit a record low.

A total of 205 companies said currency moves had negatively affected their results in the third quarter of 2013, according to FiREapps, a foreign exchange risk-management company. “More companies are trying to manage risk…but companies are still seeing highly uncorrelated moves [against the dollar] based on swings in one currency,” said FiREapps CEO Wolfgang Koester. Companies have spent much of the year insulating themselves against big moves in the euro or the yen, but swings in the Australian dollar, rupee and real dominated discussions because they were often surprises, Mr. Koester said.

Only 78 companies quantified the impact of currencies, which translated to about 3 cents a share on average. The total was up slightly from the second quarter when 95 companies reported a total impact of $4.1 billion.

On an industry basis, car makers suddenly started disclosing more currency moves during the quarter, with 16 companies mentioning their results had been affected. Ford, for example, warned last month of the potential impact from an expected Venezuelan currency devaluation in 2014.

Thumbs down A Flurry of Downgrades Kick Off the New Year

 

Wall Street analysts have gotten back to work in the new year with a flurry of ratings changes, and they have been more bearish than bullish.  As shown in the first chart below, there have been 226 total ratings changes over the first four trading days of 2014, which is the highest reading seen since the bull market began in 2009.  We have seen 134 analyst downgrades since the start of the year, which is also the highest level seen over the first four trading days since 2009.  

In percentage terms, 2014 is starting with fewer downgrades than in 2011 or 2012 (62.7% and 60.0% respectively vs. 59.2% in 2014), but these years both had very quiet starts in terms of the total number of ratings changes.  

Record-Setting Cold Hits Eastern U.S.

A record-setting cold snap in the Midwest enveloped the eastern half of the country Tuesday, with brutally cold temperatures recorded from the deep South up to New England.

Pointing up Is China About to Let the Yuan Rise? Don’t Bank on It  China’s central bankers are beginning to think the country’s huge pile of reserves – which is still growing as authorities intervene to keep the yuan from rising too fast — is excessive. Curbing its growth could even help the economy’s transition from an export-led model to one based on domestic consumption. But the top leadership’s fear of social unrest means things are unlikely to change soon.

(…) In an effort to hold down the value of its currency and keep Chinese exports competitive, the PBOC wades into markets, buying up foreign exchange and pumping out yuan on a massive scale. The PBOC probably bought $73 billion dollars of foreign exchange in October, the most in three years, and a similar amount in November, according to Capital Economics.

Even before that, official figures showed China’s reserves had hit a record $3.66 trillion by the end of the third quarter, the bulk of it invested in U.S. dollar securities like Treasury bonds. Policymakers are beginning to wonder if that hoard is too big.

Sitting on $4 trillion might not seem like a bad position to be in, but it can make a mess of domestic monetary policy if those reserves result from the central bank’s attempts to deal with capital inflows.

To prevent the yuan from appreciating, the PBOC buys up foreign exchange using newly created domestic currency. But that can fuel domestic inflation, so the central bank “sterilizes” the new money by selling central bank bills to domestic financial institutions. That leaves these institutions with less cash for lending, pushing up domestic interest rates (and ultimately leaving the central bank with a loss on its balance sheet).

Interest rates in China already are significantly higher than in many other countries, making it a tempting target for speculative “hot money” flows, which tend to find a way in despite the country’s capital controls.

“Monetary policy gets into a conundrum,” said Louis Kuijs, an economist at RBS. “If the central bank is intervening because there are huge capital inflows, the domestic interest rate in the market will go up. The more that interest rate goes up, the more capital will be attracted. It becomes difficult for the central bank to manage.”

Yi Gang, head of the State Administration of Foreign Exchange and guardian of the treasure trove, thinks the reserves are so large they’re becoming more of a burden than an asset. In an interview last month, he told financial magazine Caixin that a further build-up would bring “fewer and fewer benefits coupled with higher and higher costs.”

Those costs include not just losses on sterilization operations but also the impact of a huge export sector on the environment, he said.

But Mr. Yi does not make the decisions, any more than his boss, PBOC Gov. Zhou Xiaochuan, has the final say on interest rates. Monetary policy in China is too big a deal to be left to the central bank; the State Council, headed by Premier Li Keqiang, has to sign off on its decisions.

The technocrats at the PBOC, financial professionals who have as much faith in markets as anyone in China’s government, might want to dial back foreign-exchange intervention. But the top leaders are leery of any move that could pose a risk to employment. If factories go out of business and jobless migrants flood the streets of Guangdong, a market-determined exchange rate will be little comfort.

To be sure, China is allowing the yuan to appreciate — just not by much. The yuan has risen nearly 13% against the U.S. dollar since authorities relaxed the currency peg in June 2010, including 3% appreciation last year. But that’s far less than it would likely rise if the market were allowed to operate freely.

Never mind that a cheap currency makes it more expensive for Chinese households and businesses to buy things from the outside world, depressing standards of living and hampering the transition to a consumer society that China’s leaders ostensibly want. The policy amounts to forced saving on a huge scale — even as the officials who manage those savings say they already have more than enough for any contingency.

Some experts think the pace of China’s FX accumulation will even increase. Capital Economics says the PBOC could amass another $500 billion over the next year. That’s what they think it will take to keep the yuan from rising to more than 5.90 to the dollar, compared with 6.10 now.

“The PBOC will have to choose between allowing significant currency appreciation and continuing to accumulate foreign assets,” Mark Williams, the firm’s chief Asia economist, wrote in a research note Monday. “We expect policymakers to opt primarily for the latter.”

Emerging Markets See Selloff

The declines come amid concerns about faltering economies and political unrest.

Investors are bailing out of emerging markets from Turkey and Brazil to Thailand and Indonesia, extending a selloff that began last year, amid concerns about faltering economies and political unrest.

The MSCI Emerging Markets Index, a gauge of stocks in 21 developing markets, slipped 3.1% in the first four trading days of 2014, building on a 5% loss in 2013. This compares with double-digit-percentage rallies in stock markets in the U.S., Japan and Europe last year.

Indonesia’s currency on Tuesday hit its lowest level against the dollar since the financial crisis in Asia trading. Meanwhile, the Turkish lira plumbed record lows against the greenback this week. (…)

In the first three trading days of the year, investors yanked $1.2 billion from the Vanguard FTSE Emerging Markets ETF, VFEM.LN +0.07% the biggest emerging-markets exchange-traded fund listed in the U.S., according to data provider IndexUniverse. That is among the biggest year-to-date outflows among all ETFs. Shares of the ETF itself are down 4.2% in 2014.

Last year, money managers pulled $6 billion from emerging-market stocks, the most since 2011, according to data tracker EPFR Global. Outflows from bond markets totaled $13.1 billion, the biggest since the financial crisis of 2008. (…)

The stocks in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index on average are trading at 10.2 times next year’s earnings, compared with a P/E of 15.2 for the S&P 500, FactSet noted. (…)

In the Philippines, an inflation reading on Tuesday reached a two-year high and provided another sell signal to currency traders given officials and economists had expected the impact from the typhoon in November to be mild on inflation. The Philippine peso has weakened 1% against the dollar since the start of the year. (…)

Mohamed El-Erian
Do not bet on a broad emerging market recovery

(…) To shed more light on what happened in 2013 and what is likely to occur in 2014, we need to look at three factors that many had assumed were relics of the “old EM”.

First, and after several years of large inflows, emerging markets suffered a dramatic dislocation in technical conditions in the second quarter of 2013.

The trigger was Fed talk of “tapering” the unconventional support the US central bank provides to markets. The resulting price and liquidity disruptions were amplified by structural weaknesses associated with a narrow EM dedicated investor base and skittish cross-over investors. Simply put, “tourist dollars” fleeing emerging markets could not be compensated for quickly enough by “locals”.

Second, 2013 saw stumbles on the part of EM corporate leaders and policy makers. Perhaps overconfident due to all the talk of an emerging market age – itself encouraged by the extent to which the emerging world had economically and financially outperformed advanced countries after the 2008 global financial crisis – they underestimated exogenous technical shocks, overestimated their resilience, and under-delivered on the needed responses at both corporate and sovereign levels. Pending elections also damped enthusiasm for policy changes.

Finally, the extent of internal policy incoherence was accentuated by the currency depreciations caused by the sudden midyear reversal in cross-border capital flows. Companies scrambled to deal with their foreign exchange mismatches while central bank interest rate policies were torn between battling currency-induced inflation and countering declining economic growth.

Absent a major hiccup in the global economy – due, for example, to a policy mistake on the part of G3 central banks and/or a market accident as some asset prices are quite disconnected from fundamentals – the influence of these three factors is likely to diminish in 2014. This would alleviate pressure on emerging market assets at a time when their valuations have become more attractive on both a relative and absolute basis.

Yet the answer is not for investors to rush and position their portfolios for an emerging market recovery that is broad in scope and large in scale. Instead, they should differentiate by favouring companies commanding premium profitability and benefiting from healthy long-run consumer growth dynamics, residing in countries with strong balance sheets and a high degree of policy flexibility, and benefiting from a rising dedicated investor base.

 
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NEW$ & VIEW$ (27 DECEMBER 2013)

U.S. Holiday Sales Rise 3.5%, SpendingPulse Says

U.S. retail sales rose 3.5 percent during the holiday season this year, helped by deep discounts at malls and purchases of children’s apparel and jewelry, MasterCard Advisors SpendingPulse said.

Sales of holiday-related categories, such as clothing, electronics and luxury goods, rose 2.3 percent from Nov. 1 through Dec. 24 compared with a year earlier, the Purchase, New York-based research firm said today. SpendingPulse tracks total U.S. sales at stores and online via all payment forms. (…)

Sales were strongest in jewelry and children’s apparel, while sales of electronics and luxury items excluding jewelry were about the same as the same period last year, SpendingPulse said. Sales of women’s and men’s apparel fell from last year, the researcher said. (…)

Bullishness Jumps to Three-Year High

Individual investors were feeling especially cheery about stocks this holiday week.

The percentage of bullish individuals rose to 55.1%, the highest level in nearly three years, in the week ended Dec. 25, according to the American Association of Individual Investors. That was a jump from the 47.5% of investors who said they were bullish the previous week.

Bespoke provides the charts…

 

…and some caution

While the current level is definitely elevated, it’s by no means without precedent.  As shown below in the chart of the AAIIreading going back to 1987, sentiment has been above the 50% mark many times in the past.

The Blog of HORAN Capital Advisors adds this:

In addition to an elevated bullishness reading, the bull/bear spread has increased 37% and this spread is the highest since AAII reported the spread at 47% for the week of December 23, 2010.

Just a reminder: INVESTOR SENTIMENT SURVEYS: DON’T BE TOO SENTIMENTAL!The bearish reading is more important.

Oh! there is also that:

Twitter Rally Picks Up Steam

Twitter shares have nearly tripled since their initial public offering last month, including an almost 5% gain on Thursday, making the microblogging service’s IPO one of the best performing this year.

Twitter Now Has A Larger Market Capitalization Than 80% Of All S&P 500 Companies

(…) Why the stock has exploded the way it has, nobody knows, and frankly nobody cares: it has entered that mythical zone of raging momentum where things work, until they don’t for whatever reason. But in order to present readers with a sense of where TWTR’s $40 billion market cap, which is greater than 403, or 80%, of all S&P 500 companies, puts in in the context of several companies all of which have a market cap that is lower than Twitter’s, we have shown on the chart below Twitter’s 2014 projected Revenue compared to this same universe of immediately smaller S&P500 companies. Again, just for the sake of perspective. (…)

And that: Copper Prices at Their Highest in 8 Months

But also this:

Treasury Yield Hits 3%

Treasury bond prices fell Thursday, pushing the yield on 10-year notes to 3%, a threshold that may signal a new baseline for higher interest rates.

image
 

Hmmm!

Japan wages halt 17-month decline
Data suggest companies starting to heed calls to pay staff more

(…) Keidanren, the largest and most influential business lobby group, seems willing to recommend that its members prepare for the first increase in base salaries since 2008, when they enter spring negotiations with labour unions. (…)

But three-quarters of total salaries in Japan are paid by small and medium-sized businesses, which are mostly not unionised and where the recovery in profits has not been as strong. (…)

Another factor dragging on wages is the shift in the composition of Japan’s labour force from full-time to part-time workers. The government makes no distinction between the two in its calculations of average earnings per worker, which have fallen almost without interruption since the late 1990s.

And as data for part-timers take longer to calculate, the “encouraging” preliminary wage figures for November could be subject to a downward revision later, said Izumi Devalier, economist at HSBC in Hong Kong.

Other data released on Friday may strengthen policy makers’ confidence that Japan is shaking off 15 years of deflation. Consumer prices excluding fresh food rose 1.2 per cent from a year earlier, reaching a five-year high. Retail sales also increased more than economists expected, marking a fourth straight rise at 4 per cent from a year earlier.

The job-to-applicant ratio touched 1.00 for the first time since October 2007, meaning that there is one job available per applicant.

Ninja  A Metals Mother Lode Sits in Shadows Banks, hedge funds, commodity merchants and others are stashing millions of tons of aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc in a hidden system of warehouses.

Banks, hedge funds, commodity merchants and others are stashing tens of millions of tons of aluminum, copper, nickel and zinc in a hidden system of warehouses that span the globe.

These facilities are known to some in the industry as “shadow warehouses” because they are unregulated and don’t disclose their holdings.

They operate outside the London Metal Exchange system of warehouses, the traditional home for these metals.

As of October, a record seven million to 10 million tons of aluminum were being housed in these facilities, in countries as far apart as Malaysia and the Netherlands, according to estimates from several analysts.

The amount dwarfs the 5.5 million tons of aluminum in the LME-licensed warehouses, based on LME figures as of Tuesday. Just 12 months ago, the figures were about equal.

A similar shift is taking place with other industrial metals, analysts say. (…)

“It’s a real concern for anyone in the industry that metal can be sucked away into a nonreporting location with no expectation or date as to when it’s going to be available again,” said Nick Madden, senior vice president and chief supply-chain officer with Atlanta-based Novelis Inc., an aluminum-products maker that is among the world’s biggest buyers of the metal.

“The risk here is that the metal gets controlled by fewer and fewer hands, whose interests and business model is probably conflicting with that of end users,” he said. (…)

The lack of transparency is making this shadow system increasingly attractive to institutions seeking to profit from information that other buyers and sellers don’t have. Some companies also are seeking a cheaper alternative to the LME warehouses, which can be 10 times as expensive as the unregulated storage, analysts and traders say. (…)

Five companies operate 75% of the LME’s 778 licensed warehouses. All own shadow facilities as well, people familiar with the companies said.

In some instances, a single firm runs licensed and unlicensed warehouses in the same building, with the metal counted by the LME separated from hidden stockpiles by a chain-link fence, said David Wilson, a commodities analyst with Citigroup.

Until 2010, most warehouses were owned by logistics firms like Netherlands-based C. Steinweg Group. But as metal-financing trades became more popular, C. Steinweg was joined by units of Goldman Sachs Group Inc. and J.P. Morgan Chase & Co. as well as commodity traders Glencore Xstrata PLC of the U.K. and Switzerland and Trafigura Beheer BV of the Netherlands. (…)

Many metal buyers and producers say they are worried that new rules approved by the LME in November will speed up the flow of metal into shadow warehouses. (…)

 
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NEW$ & VIEW$ (26 DECEMBER 2013)

Signs Point to Stronger Economy

A pickup in business investment and robust new-home sales point to an economy on stronger footing as the year winds to a close.

(…) Orders for U.S. durable goods rose 3.5% last month, reversing a decline in October, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. Excluding the volatile transportation category, manufactured-goods orders rose 1.2%, the strongest gain since May.

Meanwhile, Americans continued to purchase new homes at a brisk pace in November, the Commerce Department said in a separate report this week, the latest sign the housing market is regaining traction after a rise in mortgage rates. New-home sales hit a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 464,000 last month, down only 2.1% from October’s upwardly revised annual rate of 474,000. October and November marked the two strongest months of new-home sales since mid-2008.

The pair of reports showed renewed optimism by businesses and prospective homeowners, two of the biggest drivers of the economy, and led Macroeconomic Advisers to raise its estimate for fourth-quarter growth. It now forecasts gross domestic product to expand at an annualized rate of 2.6% in the final three months of the year, up three-tenths of a percentage point from an earlier estimate.

The overall durable-goods increase was driven by business investment, particularly in civilian aircraft orders, which rose nearly 22%. But a broader measure of business spending on software and equipment rose at a solid pace in November after falling in recent months. Orders for nondefense capital goods, excluding aircraft, increased by 4.5%, its strongest pace since January. That could be a sign businesses stepped up spending after the partial government shutdown in October. (Chart and table from Haver Analytics)

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U.S. Consumer Spending Up 0.5% in November

Americans stepped up their spending in November, boding well for holiday sales and offering the latest sign the U.S. recovery is gaining momentum.

Personal consumption, reflecting what consumers spend on everything from televisions to health care, climbed 0.5% in November from a month earlier, the fastest pace since June, the Commerce Department said Monday. The gain was driven by a boost in spending on big-ticket items, more than half of which came from automobile and parts buying, and on services.

But tepid income growth could limit future gains. Personal income increased 0.2% in November after falling 0.1% in October. As a result, consumers dipped into their savings to maintain their spending. (…)

cat

The price index for personal consumption expenditures, the Federal Reserve’s preferred gauge for inflation, was flat in November from a month earlier, the second consecutive month prices went unchanged. From a year earlier, prices were up 0.9% in November, after being up 0.7% in October.

Core prices, which exclude volatile food and energy costs, rose 0.1% from October and 1.1% from a year prior.

Nerd smile What’s wrong with this chart?

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Personal income gained a disappointing 0.2% (2.3% y/y) after a minimal dip in October. Disposable personal income increased just 0.1% (1.5% y/y), held back by a 0.8% rise (9.0% y/y) in tax payments. Wages & salaries increased 0.4% but the 2.2% year-to-year increase was the weakest since mid-2010.

Real disposable income rose 0.3% during the last 3 months, a very weak 1.2% annualized rate that lead to a very low 0.6% YoY increase in November. Meanwhile, real expenditures rose 1.1%, a 4.5% annualized rate. November real spending was up 2.6% YoY. Americans just keep dissaving to sustain their living standard. For how long?

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Meanwhile, Christmas sales are fuzzy:

This chart plots weekly chain store sales which have been in a narrow +2.0-2.3% YoY gain channel since the spring. Weak!

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But Online Sales Jumped 37% During Weekend

(…) After mall-traffic tracker ShopperTrak on Monday reported a 3.1% decline in holiday in-store sales and a 21% plunge in store traffic in the crucial shopping week ended Sunday, additional data again suggest a much brighter picture online. Total online sales from Friday through Sunday surged 37% year-to-year, with mobile traffic representing two-fifths of all online traffic, according to IBM Digital Analytics. Consumers buying from their mobile devices sent mobile sales up 53%, accounting for 21.5% of all online sales, IBM said. (…)

Sad smile With what looks to be a disappointing holiday season, Retail Metrics’ Ken Perkins said Tuesday that fourth-quarter retail sales for the 120 chains it tracks is now expected to rise just an average of 1.9%, the weakest since third-quarter 2009. Profit growth is expected to be just 1.3%, also the weakest since third-quarter 2009, “when retailers were still clawing their way out of the Great Recession.”

Fourth-quarter same-store sales are expected to rise an unimpressive 1.1%.

“It has been a very disappointing holiday season to date for most of retail,” said Mr. Perkins.

Late Surge in Web Buying Blindsides UPS, Retailers A surge in online shopping this holiday season left stores breaking promises to deliver packages by Christmas, suggesting that retailers and shipping companies still haven’t fully figured out consumers’ buying patterns in the Internet era.

(…) E-commerce accounts for about 6% of overall U.S. retail sales, according to the Commerce Department. This holiday season, online purchases will be nearly 14% of sales, estimates the National Retail Federation.

During the last shopping weekend before Christmas, Web sales jumped 37% from the year before, according to IBM Digital Analytics. Market research firm Forrester Research expects online sales to increase 15% this holiday season amid slow mall traffic and weak sales at brick-and-mortar retailers.

Coming back to the slow income growth trends:

 

Mortgage Applications Drop to 13-Year Low

The average number of mortgage applications slipped 6.3% to a 13-year low on a seasonally adjusted basis as interest rates rose from the previous week, the Mortgage Bankers Association said.

Following last week’s 6.1% drop, applications for purchase mortgages were down another 3.5% w/w to the lowest level since February 2012. The purchase index is currently tracking down 11.5% y/y. (…)  Application activity remains below both the recently reported y/y growth in new home sales (+22% in October) and existing home sales (-1.2% in November), led by a declining mix of first-time buyers within both segments. Recent data also suggests mortgage credit availability has tightened slightly more. (…)

The average contract rate on 30-year fixed conforming mortgages increased 2 bp w/w to 4.64%, matching the highest level since September, and is now up 105 bp since bottoming during the week ended May 3. Overall mortgage rates are up 113 bp y/y, as the spread relative to the 10-year Treasury note has now expanded 1 bp y/y to 175 bp.

BTW, FYI:

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Calm returns to China’s money markets Central bank skips open market operations

China Expects 7.6% Growth in 2013 China’s economy will post growth of 7.6% for all of 2013, a top planning official said, indicating that the world’s second-largest economy will exceed Beijing’s 7.5% target but that it also lost momentum in the final months of the year.

(…) China’s economy posted year-over-year growth of 7.8% in the third quarter after expanding at 7.7% in the first quarter and 7.5% in the second quarter amid a still sluggish global economy. A “mini-stimulus” of government investment in rail and subway construction coupled with tax and other business incentives helped boost growth in the July-September period. (…)

Ninja I suspect the Chinese are spying on NTU which revealed the Q4 slowdown on Dec. 18.

Christmas spirit does little for Spain
Subdued domestic demand weighs on the economy

(…) Retail sales are still a quarter lower than they were before Spain slid into economic crisis more than five years ago, and some shop owners say they have seen little change in consumer behaviour so far. (…)

Until now, the recovery has been driven almost exclusively by rising exports, with domestic demand acting as a drag on growth. The surge in shipments to foreign markets was sufficiently strong to lift Spain out of recession in the third quarter this year, and has given companies the confidence to start investing in plants and machinery. But economists warn that Spain will be stuck with anaemic growth at best as long as domestic demand remains as subdued as it is now.

There are some signs of hope. According to the Bank of Spain, the decline in overall household consumption slowed in the third quarter. Spanish retail sales actually rose 2.1 per cent on an annual basis in September, the first such increase in more than three years, but fell back into negative territory the next month. Consumer confidence has risen sharply and car sales – helped by a government subsidy programme – are also up.

Javier Millán-Astray, director-general of Spain’s association of department stores and retail chains, notes that sales on the first big shopping weekend of the holiday season were up 8 per cent compared with last year, and predicts an overall rise in Christmas sales of 6-7 per cent compared with 2012. “We have seen a change in the trend since August. Sales have still been falling but the drops are much smaller than before. And the truth is that the first weekend of the Christmas season was much better than the year before.” (…)

 
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NEW$ & VIEW$ (13 DECEMBER 2013)

U.S. Retail Sales Rose 0.7%

Consumers spent more freely in November, buoying hopes that economic growth could accelerate in the months ahead.

Retail sales rose a seasonally adjusted 0.7% in November from October, marking the biggest gain since June, the Commerce Department said Thursday. The prior month’s gain was revised up to 0.6% from 0.4%. (…)

In addition to strong auto sales, the report also showed that consumers spent freely last month on furniture, electronics and building materials. Retail sales were up 4.7% from the same period last year, the largest annual gain since July.

The improvement prompted several forecasters to upgrade their predictions for economic growth in the final three months of the year. Economists at Barclays raised their estimate to a 2.2% annual rate from 2%, while J.P. Morgan Chase economists boosted their forecast to 2% from 1.5%. (…)

 

It Wasn’t Holiday Spending That Boosted Retail Sales

When you just look at categories where people buy gifts, such as electronics, clothing and department stores and even add in online retailers, and exclude car dealers, gas stations and restaurants, sales were up just 2.8% in November from a year earlier. That represents the weakest nonrecession November in at least 20 tears and compares to a 4.7% gain for total retail sales.

(…)  maybe it just means that more people decided to get their holiday shopping done in December. And if that holds true, it means December’s retail sales could be a blockbuster.

Sales of motor vehicles & parts led the increase with a 1.8% gain (10.2% y/y). Furniture & electronics/appliance store sales jumped 1.1% (8.2% y/y) following a 2.2% October surge.

Is The Consumer Slowing Down?

Written by Lance Roberts

(…) The problem with any single data point is that it obscures the trend of the data, as shown in the chart below, which is more telling of the overall strength or weakness of the consumer.  

The chart above is the 12-month average of non-seasonally adjusted retail sales data.  This eliminates all of the questionable gimmickry of the seasonal adjustments to reveal the underlying trend of actual retail sales data.  Surging asset prices have done little to boost retail sales which have stagnated in recent months just above the level which has normally been indicative of recessionary drags in the economy.  (…)

But that helps:image

U.S. Business Inventories Continue to Climb

Total business inventories increased 0.7% in October (3.6% y/y) following a 0.6% September gain. These inventories accompanied a 0.5% rise in business sales (3.9% y/y) after September’s 0.3% increase. As a result, the inventory-to-sales ratio remained at 1.29, where it’s been since April.

In the retail sector, inventories advanced 0.8% (6.1% y/y) in October, including a 2.1% jump (11.5% y/y) in motor vehicles. Inventories excluding autos rose 0.2% (3.6% y/y) in October. Inventories of furniture, electronics and appliances rose 0.4% (-1.5% y/y) while building materials slipped 0.2% (+2.7% y/y).

Euro-Zone Jobs Market Stabilizes

The euro-zone jobs market stabilized in the six months to September, according to employment figures, bringing an end to a long decline in the number of people at work in the 17 countries that use the euro.

The European Union’s statistics agency said that on a seasonally adjusted basis, 145 million people were in work across the currency area during the third quarter, a figure unchanged from the previous period. Eurostat also revised its figures for the second quarter, and now calculates that there was no change in employment levels, having previously estimated there was a 0.1% decline.

In Germany, employment levels were up 0.6% on the same period last year, while in Greece they were down 2.9%. Indeed, seven of the euro zone’s members were still experiencing a decline in employment during the three months to September.

Saudi Arabia Exposes OPEC’s Fissures

(…) As The Wall Street Journal’s crack OPEC team reports, Saudi Arabia has essentially promised to steady markets for the past two years. But now, with pressure growing over a possible output cut to steady markets, the Saudis are signaling they are no longer willing to go it alone. (…)

Riyadh sees no reason why it and it alone should have to shoulder the burden of trimming and this week’s apparent withdrawal from its role as swing producer is the clearest sign yet of its deep concern.

This month’s OPEC meeting in Vienna was, on the face of it, a cut-and-dried affair. For reporters, the focus was on Iran more than the collective, as the decision to stand pat on overall production was widely expected.

But behind closed doors great rifts are opening up, with Saudi and its Gulf neighbors in one camp, Iran in another and Iraq in a third. Each has issues, both oil-related and political, with the others. (…)

House Approves Budget Pact

The House passed a budget bill designed to avoid a government shutdown next month and relax spending limits in the next two years.

The bill passed with a wide bipartisan margin, on a vote of 332-94. Voting for the measure were 169 Republicans and 163 Democrats, while 62 Republicans and 32 Democrats voted against.

Approval of the bill, which is expected to pass the Senate next week, clears the way for a less-glamorous stage of budgeting as lawmakers set out to make line-by-line spending decisions before current funding runs out Jan. 15. (…)

“Elections have consequences,”‘ said Mr. Ryan, who was his party’s 2012 vice-presidential nominee.  (…)

There is no guarantee that the bipartisan deal signals the end of brinkmanship or that this episode of bipartisanship will reach into other areas. The most immediate test will be the next month’s work on appropriations legislation, which must be enacted before Jan. 15.

The agreement sets only the overall spending targets for domestic and defense programs: $1.012 trillion in the current fiscal year, which is more than the $986 billion provided in 2013. Spending this year would have been even lower—$967 billion—had the sequester cuts taken effect. Under the deal, it would increase to $1.014 trillion in the year starting next Oct. 1. (…)

Goldman Sachs Goes Against Consensus in Dollar Call

Goldman Sachs Group Inc.’s Thomas Stolper, who correctly predicted the dollar’s slide against the euro this year, is deviating from the consensus that the greenback will be among the best currencies to own in 2014.

The dollar will weaken through 2014, reaching $1.40 per euro for the first time since October 2011, Goldman’s London-based chief currency strategist said. The mean estimate in a Bloomberg survey of 46 contributors is for a 7 percent rally to $1.28 per euro from $1.3758 today.

 
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NEW$ & VIEW$ (9 DECEMBER 2013)

GREEN FRIDAY

After pretty tame Black Friday and Thanksgiving sales, investors got their Green Friday with an ‘Unambiguously Positive’ Jobs Report accompanied by a relieving 1.1% jump in the S&P 500 Index, the best of all worlds for taper advocates. Good news is good news again!

The media narratives just flowed from that.

Employers Gain Confidence to Hire

U.S. employers are gaining confidence heading into year’s end, hiring at the quickest clip since before Washington’s political dysfunction rattled consumers and businesses this fall.

Payrolls rose by a seasonally adjusted 203,000 in November in sectors ranging from construction to health care, a striking pickup at an uncertain moment for the economy. Moreover, the jobless rate fell to 7% from 7.3%, though its declines in recent months have been driven in part by people leaving the labor force. (…)

U.S. job growth over the past three months now averages 193,000. In September, the average was thought to be 143,000; it has since been revised higher. (…)November’s job gains were more broad-based than in some previous months, suggesting fundamental economic improvements are reaching more parts of the economy.

Economists have worried that the biggest drivers of the nation’s job growth are lower-paying industries like retailers and restaurants. While those industries still represent a big chunk of the job gains, higher-paying sectors like manufacturing also grew in November, adding 27,000 jobs. (…)

It remains that

Nearly one-third of the private-sector job gains in November came from retailers, hotels, restaurants and temporary help agencies.

Retailers added 22,000 workers last month, while restaurants and hotels added 17,000 positions. Temporary help services hired another 16,000.

Lower-paying industries have dominated U.S. job growth for much of the recovery. Over the past year, retailers and temporary-help services have added 323,000 and 219,000 jobs, respectively.

By comparison, manufacturers added only 76,000 jobs.

As we all know, stats can be used to fit any viewpoint: the low month for job growth in 2013 was July at 89k.

  • First 6 months average employment change: +195k.
  • Last 5 months average employment change: +181k. Not enough to call it an ‘Unambiguously Positive’ jobs report. Tapering delayed.

But move July into the first part of the year:

  • First 7 months average employment change: +180k.
  • Last 4 months average employment change: +204k. Here comes the taper!

Never mind that the economy has added 2.3 million jobs over the past year, a pace that has changed little for the past two years in spite of QE1, 2,and 3.

Never mind that

Compared with September, the last reading before the shutdown, the new figures showed 265,000 fewer people working or looking for work, taking the labour market participation rate down from 63.2 per cent to 63 per cent of the adult population.

Declining participation was the main cause of the large fall in the unemployment rate, creating a puzzle and a worry for the Fed. If people are permanently dropping out of the labour force then it suggests there is less spare capacity in the economy.(FT)

Never mind that

Markit’s recent PMI surveys showed that the rate of growth was below that seen in September. Hiring slipped to the lowest for eight months as a result of firms reporting growing unease about the outlook. (Markit)

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And never mind the important inventory build up revealed by the Q3 GDP, recent car data and clear evidence of enormous surplus retail inventory post Thanksgiving, all suggesting that the recent manufacturing uptrend may be short lived. The U.S. economy, and for that matter Europe’s as well, have been propped up by a production push rather than by a more solid and durable consumer pull.

Real consumer expenditures rose 0.3% MoM in October after edging up 0.1% in September, in spite of a 0.2% advance in real disposable income during the last 2 months. Taking the 4-month period from July, real expenditures are growing at a 1.8% annualized rate, unchanged from the preceding 4-month period. During both periods, real disposable income has grown 2.7% annualized but real labour income growth halved from 1.8% annualized in March-June to 0.9% annualized in July-October.

Consumer demand sustained by government transfer income and a low savings rate is not solid foundation for economic growth, needless to say. It gets even more dangerous when corporate inventories accumulate rapidly, especially during the all important fourth quarter.

Taper or not? Taking liquidity out when things are so fragile would be a big mistake in my view. The Fed won its bet with QE-induced wealth boost for the top 10% but it would be ill-advised to take the punch bowl away before the ordinary people’s party begins.

Fed credibility has already been hurt by all the goofy rhetoric since last May. The only transparency they have achieved is to expose their flaws wide open. When you decide to be more transparent, you better make sure that what you have to show is attractive…otherwise, be a Greenspan and let markets guess for haven’s sake.

To be sure, as BCA Research is quoted in Barron’s (my emphasis),

(…) policy makers are hoping for a cyclical rebound in the participation rate as discouraged workers are drawn back into the labor market. There is no evidence that this is occurring so far.


As a result, BCA thinks the Fed will lower the threshold for forward guidance about increases in the federal-funds target (which has been pinned near 0% to 0.25% since late 2008) until the jobless rate falls to 5% or even 5.5%, instead of the current 6.5%, which could be reached by next October if current trends continue. The Fed’s notion is that the better job market will lure folks on the sideline to start looking for work again, slowing the decline in unemployment, even as more people find positions. But BCA says its clients are increasingly worried that there is less slack in the labor market than presumed and that the Fed is making an inflationary policy mistake.

Much like a rising equity market eventually lures investors into action.

In all what was said and written last Friday, this is what must be most reassuring to Ben Bernanke:

Jonas Prising, president of staffing company Manpower Group, said the official numbers fit with what is happening on the ground. “What we see is a continued improvement in employers’ outlook. Despite what you see and hear about uncertainty, employers are clearly seeing a gradually improving economy,” said Mr Prising, noting that the pick-up in hiring was slow but steady. (WSJ)

TAPER WATCH

This is from Fed’s mouthpiece John Hilsenrath:

Fed Closes In on Bond Exit

Fed officials are closer to winding down their $85 billion-a-month bond-purchase program, possibly as early as December, in the wake of Friday’s encouraging jobs report.

The Fed’s next policy meeting is Dec. 17-18 and a pullback, or tapering, is on the table, though some might want to wait until January or even later to see signs the recent strength in economic growth and hiring will be sustained. On Tuesday, officials go into a “blackout” period in which they stop speaking publicly and begin behind-the-scenes negotiations about what to do at the policy gathering. (…)

The sharp rise in stocks Friday shows that the Fed is having some success reassuring investors that it will maintain easy-money policies for years to come.

(…) the November employment report was the latest in a batch of recent indicators that have boosted their confidence that the economy and markets are in better position to stand with less support from large monthly central bank intervention in credit markets.

Pointing up The economic backdrop looks better now than it did in September. Fingers crossed

Payroll employment growth during the past three months has averaged 193,000 jobs per month, compared with 143,000 during the three months before the September meeting.

Moreover, in September, the White House and Congress were heading into a government shutdown and potential a debt ceiling crisis. Now they appear to be crafting a small government spending agreement for the coming year. The headwinds from federal tax increases and spending cuts this year could wane, possibly setting the stage for stronger economic growth next year.

Still, the jobs report wasn’t greeted as unambiguously good news inside the Fed. One problem was an undertone of distress among households even as the jobless rate falls.

The government’s survey of households showed that a meager 83,000 people became employed between September and November, while the number not in the labor force during that stretch rose by 664,000. The jobless rate fell from 7.2% to 7% during the period effectively because people stopped looking for jobs and removed themselves from the ranks of people counted as unemployed.

“The unemployment rate [drop] probably overstates the improvement in the economy,” Chicago Fed President Charles Evans told reporters Friday.

Another worry among officials, and another reason some officials might wait a bit before moving: Inflation, as measured by the Commerce Department’s personal consumption expenditure price index, was up just 0.7% from a year earlier, well below the Fed’s 2% target. Mr. Evans said he was troubled and puzzled by the very low inflation trend. (…)

Fed December Taper Odds Double in Survey as Jobs Beat Estimate

 

The share of economists predicting the Federal Reserve will reduce bond buying in December doubled after a government report showed back-to-back monthly payroll gains of 200,000 or more for the first time in almost a year. (…)

The payroll report puts the four-month average for gains at 204,000, and the six-month average at 180,000. Chicago Fed President Charles Evans, a supporter of record stimulus who votes on policy this year, said in April he wants gains of 200,000 a month for about six months before tapering. Atlanta’s Dennis Lockhart, who doesn’t vote, said several months of gains exceeding 180,000 would make slowing appropriate.

“The 200,000 number hits you right between the eyes,” said Chris Rupkey, chief financial economist at Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ Ltd. in New York. “That’s a number that everyone agrees the labor market is showing good-size gains, and the progress they’re making seems to be sustainable if that marker is met, which it was.”

See! It all boils down to where July stands in the economic calendar.

Credit-Card Debt Hits Three-Year High

U.S. consumers pushed their credit-card debt to a three-year high in October, a possible sign of their willingness to boost spending into the holiday season.

Revolving credit, which largely reflects money owed on credit cards, advanced by a seasonally adjusted $4.33 billion in October, the Federal Reserve said Friday. The expansion pushed total revolving debt to $856.82 billion, the highest level since September 2010.

The expansion marked a reversal from the prior four months when revolving balances either declined or held nearly flat. Consumers’ reluctance to add to credit-card balances was viewed by some economists as a sign of caution.

“Increasingly households are becoming more comfortable with using their plastic, and carrying a balance on it,” said Patrick J. O’Keefe, director of economic research at consulting firm CohnReznick. “The scars of 2007 and 2008 are starting to heal.”

When consumers are willing to carry a credit-card balance, it suggests they are confident they’ll have the future income needed to pay down the debt, he said.

The turnaround came in a month that brought a 16-day government shutdown, which weighed on consumer confidence and left hundreds of thousands of government workers without paychecks for weeks. (That may have been one factor in the increased use of credit cards. The federal workers received back pay after the shutdown.)

Total consumer credit, excluding home loans, rose by $18.19 billion in October, the largest gain since May. Economists surveyed by Dow Jones Newswires had forecast a $14.8 billion advance. (…)

The Fed report showed non-revolving debt, mostly auto and education loans, increased by $13.85 billion, or a 7.5% annualized jump. Such debt has been trending steadily higher since 2010, reflecting a surge in government-backed student loans and purchases of new autos. (…)

(ZeroHedge)

Fingers crossed  Congress Readies a Year-End Budget Dash

A Congress stymied by partisan divides, blown deadlines and intraparty squabbling gets a late chance to end the year with an elusive budget deal.

In the final week of 2013 that the Senate and House are scheduled to be in Washington at the same time, lawmakers and aides are optimistic that negotiators can reach a budget accord and continue to make progress on a farm bill and other measures.

China Exports Rise More Than Estimated

Overseas shipments rose 12.7 percent from a year earlier, the General Administration of Customs said today in Beijing. That exceeded estimates from 41 of 42 analysts surveyed by Bloomberg News. The trade surplus of $33.8 billion was the biggest since January 2009, while imports gained 5.3 percent, compared with a median projection of 7 percent.

The export figures reflect pickups in shipments to the U.S., Europe and South Korea, according to customs data.

China Inflation Stays Benign

 

The November consumer-price index was up 3% from a year ago, slowing down slight from October’s 3.2% pace, the statistics bureau said Monday. That was just below market expectations of a 3.1% rise and well within the government’s target of 3.5% inflation for the year.

Consumer inflation was even less of a worry when looked at on a month-over-month basis: It showed a decline of 0.1% in November, its first such drop since May.

At the factory level, producer prices continued to slide year-over-year, falling 1.4% for the 21st monthly decline in a row, showing continued weakness in domestic demand for raw materials. The decline in November was slightly less than the October’s 1.5%.

Japanese growth revised down
Third-quarter growth hit by weaker business activity

The updated calculation of gross domestic product in the three months to September showed that economic output increased at an annualised rate of 1.1 per cent, compared with an initial estimate of 1.9 per cent announced in November. (…)

The downward revision for the third quarter owed to lower estimates of investment and inventory-building by companies. Consumer spending was revised upward, but not enough to offset the less favourable view of business activity.

Corporate capital investment did not grow at all during the period, the data showed; the initial estimate had suggested a 0.7 per cent expansion. Inventory growth was cut to 0.7 per cent from double that figure in the initial data, while the estimate of private consumption growth was doubled to a still modest 0.8 per cent.

Bundesbank lifts German growth outlook
Central bank forecasts economic expansion of 1.7% in 2014

Germany’s Bundesbank has upgraded its economic projections, saying on Friday that strong demand from consumers would leave the euro area’s largest economy operating at full capacity over the next two years.

The Bundesbank has forecast growth of 1.7 per cent in 2014 and 1.8 per cent the following year. The unemployment rate, which at 5.2 per cent in October is already among the lowest in the currency bloc, is expected to fall further. (…)

The Bundesbank also expected inflation to fall back in 2014 – to 1.3 per cent from 1.6 per cent this year – before climbing to 1.5 per cent. If falls in energy prices were excluded, inflation would register 1.9 per cent next year.

EARNINGS, SENTIMENT WATCH

Notice the positive spin and the bee-sss just about everywhere now.

U.S. stocks could weather grim profit outlooks

The ratio of profit warnings to positive outlooks for the current quarter is shaping up to be the worst since at least 1996, based on Thomson Reuters data.

More warnings may jolt the market next week, but market watchers say this trend could be no more than analysts being too optimistic at the beginning and needing to adjust downward.

“There’s a natural tendency on the part of Wall Street in any given year to be overly optimistic as it relates to the back half of the year … It isn’t so much the companies’ failing, it’s where Wall Street has decided to place the bar,” said Matthew Kaufler, portfolio manager for Clover Value Fund at Federated Investors in Rochester, New York.

So any negative news about earnings may “already be in the stock prices,” he said. Sarcastic smile (…)

Still, estimates for fourth-quarter S&P 500 earnings have fallen sharply since the start of the year when analysts were building in much stronger profit gains for the second half of the year.

Earnings for the quarter are now expected to have increased 7.8 percent from a year ago compared with estimates of 17.6 percent at the start of the year and 10.9 percent at the start of the fourth quarter. (…)

The 11.4 to 1 negative-to-positive ratio of earnings forecasts sets the fourth quarter up as the most negative on record, based on Reuters data.

So far 120 companies have issued outlooks. In a typical quarter, between 130 and 150 S&P 500 companies issue guidance.

In small and mid-cap stocks, the trend appears much less gloomy.

Thomson Reuters data for S&P 400 companies shows 2.2 negative outlooks for every one positive forecast, while data for S&P 600 companies shows a similar ratio.

The S&P 500 technology sector so far leads in negative outlooks with 28, followed by consumer discretionary companies, with 22 warnings for the fourth quarter. (…)

“It appears while the percentage (of warnings) is high, it’s still not really infiltrating to all sectors,” said Peter Cardillo, chief market economist at Rockwell Global Capital in New York. “Obviously it impacts the individual (stocks), but maybe not the market trend.” (…)

So, this is a stock market, not a market of stocks!

Punch  That said, here’s a surprise for you: analysts estimates have actually gone up in the past 10 days:

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CAPITULATION
 
Hugh HendryA bear capitulates
Hugh Hendry on why equities will rise further

Hugh Hendry is CIO of Eclectica Asset Management

(…) In this environment the actual price of an asset no longer has anything to do with our qualitative perception of reality: valuations are out, liquidity in. In the wacky world created by such monetary fidgeting there is one reason for being long markets and one alone: sovereign nations are printing money and prices are trending. That is it. (…)

So here is how I understand things. You should buy equities if you believe many European banks and their sovereign paymasters are insolvent. You should be long risk assets if you believe China will have lowered its growth rate from 7 per cent to nearer 5 per cent over the course of the next two years. You should be long US equities if you are worried about the failure of Washington to address its fiscal deficits. And you should buy Japanese assets if you fear that Abenomics will fail to restore the fortunes of Japan.

It will all end badly; the mouse will die of course but in the meantime the stock markets look to us much as they did in 1928 or in 1998. In economic terms, America and Europe will remain resilient without booming. But with monetary policy set much too loose it is inevitable we will continue to witness mini-economic cycles that convince investors that economies are escaping stall speed and that policy rates are likely to rise. This happened in May.

The Fed, convinced its QE programme had succeeded in re-distributing global GDP away from China, began signalling its intent to taper. However, the anticipated vigorous American growth never materialised. The Fed had to shock market expectations by removing the immediacy of its tighter policy and stock markets rebounded higher.

So the spectre of tapering will probably continue to haunt markets but stronger growth in one part of the world on the back of easier policy will be countered by even looser policy elsewhere. Market expectations of tighter policy will keep being rescinded and markets, for now, will probably just keep trending.

Lance Roberts today (with a lot more from Hugh Hendry if you care):

(…) The PRIMARY ISSUE here is that there is NO valuation argument
that currently supports asset prices at current levels.

It is simply the function of momentum within the prevailing trend that makes the case for higher prices from here.

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Hmmm…The trend is your friend, hey? With friends like that…

THE U.S. ENERGY GAME CHANGER

I wrote about that in 2012 (Facts & Trends: The U.S. Energy Game Changer). It is now happening big time.

Shale gas boom helps US chemicals exports
America now second cheapest location for chemicals plants

The US chemicals industry is planning a sharp increase in its exports as a result of the cost advantage created by the shale gas boom, putting pressure on higher-cost competitors in Europe and Asia.

The American Chemistry Council, the industry association, predicts in forecasts published this week that US chemicals exports will rise 45 per cent over the next five years, as a result of a wave of investment in new capacity that will be aiming at overseas markets. (…)

The shale revolution has caused a boom in US production of natural gas liquids used as chemical feedstocks such as ethane, and sent their prices tumbling.

US producers also face electricity costs about half their levels in Europe, and natural gas just one-third as high.

The result has been a dramatic reversal from the mid-2000s, when the US was one of the world’s most expensive locations for manufacturing chemicals, to today when it is the second cheapest, bettered only by projects in the Middle East that have tied up feedstock on favourable terms.

International chemicals companies have announced 136 planned or possible investments in the US worth about $91bn, according to the ACC, with half of those projects proposed by non-US companies. (…)

“The US has become the most attractive place in the world to invest in chemical manufacturing.”

DEMOGRAPHICS

We can discuss political and financial philosophies, fiscal policies and monetary policies till the cows come home. But there is one thing that is mighty difficult to argue about: demographics. As Harry Dent says in this interview with John Mauldin, you have to go back 250 years to find a generation with as much impact as the current supersized baby boomer generation. The impact of retiring baby boomers is so powerful that it can totally offset fiscal and monetary policies without anyone noticing. The 20 minutes interview is not as good as I was hoping it might be but still deserves your time.

A team of Kansas City Fed economists just wrote about The Impact of an Aging U.S. Population on State Tax Revenues (http://goo.gl/u5g3j5) with this chart that summarizes the stealth trends underway:

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Here’s another way to deal with an adverse job market:

Saudi deportations gain momentum
Riyadh to expel up to 2m workers

Riyadh has said it wants to forcibly expel as many as 2m of the foreign workers, including hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians, Somalis, Indians, Pakistanis and Bangladeshis, who make up around a third of the country’s 30m population.

At home, the exodus of illegal workers is being seen as the kingdom’s most radical labour market experiment yet. With one in four young Saudi males out of work, analysts applaud Riyadh’s determination to tackle the problem, but doubt the crackdown will achieve its objective, as Saudi nationals are unlikely to apply for menial jobs. (…)

Ethiopia, Yemen, Somalia and several other countries are struggling to absorb the thousands of unemployed young men now returning, with development officials worrying about the impact on remittances.

Saudi Arabia is the world’s second biggest source of remittances, only behind the US, with outflows of nearly $28bn last year, according to estimates by the World Bank. (…)  Saudi analysts expect the crackdown on illegal workers to reduce remittance flows by nearly a quarter next year, or about $7bn. (…)

The crackdown on African and Asian illegal migrants is meant to complement a government labour market reform known as nitaqat, Arabic for “ranges”. Replacing the failing fixed-quota “Saudisation” system of 1994, nitaqat places a sliding scale of financial penalties and incentives on employers who fail to hire enough Saudi nationals. By draining the pool of cheap expatriate labour, the Saudi government hopes to encourage private sector employers to hire more nationals.

“The nationalisation agenda has been around for 20 years, but what’s changed is that the Arab spring has made private sector jobs for nationals a political priority,” says Steffen Hertog of the London School of Economics. “Saudi Arabia has become a laboratory for labour market reform,” he says. (…)

BUY LOW, SELL HIGH

A 700- year chart to prove a point:

Global Financial Data has put together an index of Government Bond yields that uses bonds from each of these centers of economic power over time to trace the course of interest rates over the past seven centuries.  From 1285 to 1600, Italian bonds are used.   Data are available for the Prestiti of Venice from 1285 to 1303 and from 1408 to 1500 while data from 1304 to 1407 use the Consolidated Bonds of Genoa and the Juros of Italy from 1520 to 1598.

General Government Bonds from the Netherlands are used from 1606 to 1699.   Yields from Britain are used from 1700 to 1914, using yields on Million Bank stock (which invested in government securities) from 1700 to 1728 and British Consols from 1729 to 1918.  From 1919 to date, the yield on US 10-year bond is used.

Ralph Dillon of Global Financial Data

 
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NEW$ & VIEW$ (4 DECEMBER 2013)

Smile Companies Boost U.S. Payrolls by Most in a Year

The 215,000 increase in employment exceeded the most optimistic forecast in a Bloomberg survey and followed a revised 184,000 gain in October that was larger than initially estimated, according to the ADP Research Institute in Roseland, New Jersey. The median forecast of economists called for a 170,000 advance.

Auto CAR SALES NOT AS STRONG AS HEADLINES SUGGEST

 

WSJ:  Brisk Demand Lifts Auto Sales

(…) Overall, demand remained strong with 1.25 million light vehicles sold last month, up 9% from a year ago, lifting the annualized sales pace to 16.4 million vehicles, from 15.3 million a year ago and the strongest pace since February 2007, according to Autodata Corp.(…)

Haver Analytics: U.S. Vehicle Sales Surge to Seven-Year High

The latest level of sales was the highest since February 2007.

But sales had been quite weak in both September and October at 15.2M, the former due to fewer selling days and the latter presumably due to the government shutdown. Taking a 3-month moving average, the annualized selling rate has been flat at 15.6M since June 2013, even though manufacturers’ incentives have kept rising briskly. (Chart from CalculatedRisk)


Doug Waikem, owner of several new-car dealerships in Ohio, said discounts aren’t “out of control” but car makers are pushing retailers to buy more vehicles, a practice that boosts auto maker’s revenue.

“I think we’re slipping back into old habits,” Mr. Waiken said. “I’m seeing dealers with inventories going up. The banks are being very aggressive.”

On Nov. 20, I warned about a possible build up in car inventories if sales don’t accelerate rapidly. Monthly inventories of the Detroit Three were at a high 76 days in October.

The Detroit Three each reported a roughly 90 days’ supply of cars and light trucks in inventory at the end of November. Auto makers generally prefer to keep between 60 days and 80 days of sales at dealers. Company executives said the inventory levels are acceptable for this time of year.

Well, not really acceptable to Ford:

Ford announced its initial Q1/14 production schedule, with volumes expected to decline 2% year over year, which is slightly worse versus the most recent forecast from Ward’s Automotive for Ford’s production to increase by 2% year over year in Q1/14 and compares to our estimate for overall Detroit Three production to increase 4% year over year in Q1/14. (BMO Capital)

The risk remains that car sales, having bounced thanks to the wealth effect and pent up demand, have reached their cyclical peak.

 

More inventory problems:

Inventories Threaten to Squeeze Clothing Stores

Chains including Abercrombie & Fitch Co., Chico’s FAS Inc., Gap Inc. and Victoria’s Secret came into the fourth quarter with heavy inventory loads. The concern now is the retail industry’s weak showing over Thanksgiving weekend will force them to take bigger markdowns that could hurt their fourth-quarter profits.

Simeon Siegel, an analyst with Nomura Equity Research, looked at the inventory carried by those and other specialty-apparel retailers at the end of the third quarter and compared it with his projections for the chains’ fourth quarter sales. He found that in most cases inventory growth far outpaced sales growth. Normally, the two should be growing about the same.

“The ratios are the worst we have seen in quite a while,” Mr. Siegel said.

The companies each acknowledged that their inventories were rising and said the levels were appropriate.

Yet with holiday sales getting off to a slow start, positions that seemed appropriate several weeks ago may turn out to be too high. A survey commissioned by the National Retail Federation concluded that sales over Thanksgiving weekend fell to $57.4 billion from $59.1 billion a year ago—the first drop in at least seven years.

Fewer shoppers said they had bought clothing or visited apparel stores, according to the NRF survey, which polled nearly 4,500 consumers.

Marshal Cohen, the chief industry analyst for the NPD Group, said he spotted signs throughout the weekend that stores were overstocked, including goods stacked high up on shelves and ample merchandise in storerooms. (…)

Thanksgiving sales were generally weak, as were back-to-school sales. If Christmas sales are also weak, the inventory overhang will carry into Q1’14.

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HOUSING IS ALSO WEAK:

The seasonally adjusted Purchase Index decreased 4 percent from one week earlier. The 4-week average of the purchase index is now down about 8% from a year ago. (CalculatedRisk)


Ghost  Romain Hatchuel: The Coming Global Wealth Tax

(…) households from the United States to Europe and Japan may soon face fiscal shocks worse than any market crash. The White House and New York Mayor-elect Bill de Blasio aren’t the only ones calling for higher taxes (especially on the wealthy), as voices from the International Monetary Fund to billionaire investor Bill Gross increasingly make the case too. (…)

As for the IMF, its latest Fiscal Monitor report argues that taxing the wealthy offers “significant revenue potential at relatively low efficiency costs.” (…)

From New York to London, Paris and beyond, powerful economic players are deciding that with an ever-deteriorating global fiscal outlook, conventional levels and methods of taxation will no longer suffice. That makes weapons of mass wealth destruction—such as the IMF’s one-off capital levy, Cyprus’s bank deposit confiscation, or outright sovereign defaults—likelier by the day.

Could there now be a wealth tax anticipation effect that would incite the wealthiest to save right when they are about the only source of demand?

Trade Gap in U.S. Shrank in October on Record Exports

Exports climbed 1.8 percent to $192.7 billion on growing sales of food, petroleum products, drilling equipment and consumer goods, including jewelry.

Imports increased 0.4 percent to $233.3 billion in October, the most since March 2012. Gains in consumer goods such as toys and artwork, and fuel helped offset a slump in purchases of foreign automobiles.

Sales of goods to China, Canada and Mexico were the highest ever, pointing to improving global demand that will benefit American manufacturers. In addition, an expanding U.S. economy is helping boost growth abroad as purchases of products from the European Union also climbed to a record in October even as fiscal gridlock prompted a partial federal shutdown.

Hmmm…

Lightning  EUROZONE RETAIL TRADE TURNS WEAKER, AGAIN

Core sales volume cratered 0.8% in October after declining 0.1% in September. German sales volume dropped 1.0% on the past 2 months. 

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European Stocks Suffer a Setback

European stocks fell sharply across the board today.  In Germany and France, markets have been very quiet over the last few months, steadily moving higher in small clips on a daily basis.  That came to an end today with big moves lower in both countries.  Germany is still well above its 50-day moving average and its uptrend remains intact, but the same can no longer be said for France.  As shown in the second chart below, the French CAC-40 broke hard through its 50-day today, which also represented the bottom of its multi-month uptrend channel.

Along with France, the UK (FTSE 100) and Italy (FTSE MIB) also saw significant breaks below their 50-days today.  For Italy’s major index, the 50-day had acted as key support going back to August, but that’s no longer the case after the wash out we saw today.

The fall in Europe sent US stocks lower this morning, and it was the stocks with heavy exposure to Europe that got hit the hardest.  Keep an eye on this trend in the days ahead.  

BANKING

Wall Street Sweats Out Volcker Rule With 18% of Revenue in Play

(…) The $44 billion at stake represents principal trading revenue at the five largest Wall Street firms in the 12 months ended Sept. 30, led by New York-based JPMorgan, the biggest U.S. lender, with $11.4 billion. An additional $14 billion of the banks’ investment revenue could be reduced by the rule’s limits on stakes in hedge funds and private-equity deals. Collectively, the sum represents 18 percent of the companies’ revenue.

Goldman Sachs and Morgan Stanley may be the most affected by any additional restrictions since they generate about 30 percent of their revenue from principal trading. JPMorgan generated about 12 percent of its total revenue from principal transactions in the 12 months ended Sept. 30. The figure was less than 10 percent for Bank of America, based in Charlotte, North Carolina, and New York-based Citigroup Inc.

OIL
 
Iran threatens to trigger oil price war
Tehran warns Opec it will increase output even if prices tumble

(…) Speaking to Iranian journalists in Farsi minutes before ministers went into a closed-door meeting, Bijan Zangeneh, Iran’s oil minister, said: “Under any circumstances we will reach 4m b/d even if the price of oil falls to $20 per barrel.” (…)

Iraq, meanwhile, has also said it plans to increase production by 1m b/d next year to 4mb/d.

Detroit’s bankruptcy: pensions beware

(…) The news is a ruling by federal bankruptcy judge Steven Rhodes that, contrary to the arguments of public workers’ unions, pensions can be cut in the restructuring. Detroit is the largest city ever to go bust, so its bankruptcy will be widely watched regardless, but its treatment of pensions and other matters could set important precedents. (…)

Cities and unions around the US have received a wake-up call: they need to address unfunded pension obligations now, or face the ugly possibility of deep cuts later. Muni bond investors also face a new reality. The rules of the game may change and, if they do, the prices of general obligation munis will too.

Here’s the WSJ’s take on this: Detroit’s Bankruptcy Breakthrough

(…) More significant for the future of America’s cities, Judge Rhodes also dismissed the union conceit that the language of Michigan’s constitution protects public pensions as “contractual obligations” that cannot be “diminished or impaired.” The express purpose of bankruptcy is to impair contracts, and Judge Rhodes emphasized that pension benefits are “not entitled to any heightened protection in bankruptcy.”

If pension benefits are immune from bankruptcy, then unions would have even less incentive than they do now to consider the economic condition of a city when they press politicians for more benefits. They could drive cities toward bankruptcy knowing that bondholders would have to absorb nearly all the burden of restructuring. Cities would also have no recourse other than to raise taxes or cut more current services, neither of which helps urban renewal. (…)

Judge Rhodes’s wise ruling is a warning to unions and their political bodyguards that Chapter 9 is not a pension safe harbor. American public finance will be better as a result.

 
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