NEW$ & VIEW$ (18 DECEMBER 2013)

Low Inflation Tests World’s Central Banks Inflation is slowing across the developed world despite ultralow interest rates and unprecedented money-printing campaigns, posing a dilemma for the Fed and other major central banks as they plot their next policy moves.

U.S. consumer prices rose just 1.2% in November from a year earlier, according to Labor Department data released Tuesday.

Meanwhile, annual inflation in the euro zone was 0.9% in November, the European Union’s statistics office said Tuesday. And central banks in Sweden and Hungary cut interest rates, the latest efforts elsewhere in Europe to boost struggling economies as inflation remains low. (…)

Central bankers worry about inflation falling too low because it raises the risk of deflation, or generally falling prices, a phenomenon that is difficult to combat through monetary policy. Some economists believe weak or falling prices can lead consumers to delay major purchases, exacerbating an economic slowdown. Even without deflation, very low inflation can be a sign of weak demand that weighs on wages, corporate profits and growth.

Low Inflation Tests World Central Banks

BEWARE COMPLACENCY ON U.S. INFLATION

The CPI less food and energy, also called core inflation, increased 0.2% (1.9% annualized rate) on a seasonally adjusted basis, after 3 months of consecutive 0.1% montlhy gains.

According to the Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland, the median Consumer Price Index rose 0.2% (2.2% annualized rate) in November. Median prices have been rising by 0.2% in 7 of the past 8 months,

Over the last 12 months, the median CPI rose 2.0%, the trimmed-mean CPI rose 1.6%, the CPI rose 1.2%, and the CPI less food and energy rose 1.7%

image

Mug Is The Fed Driving You To Drink? 

Correlations!

LET’S HOPE HE’S RIGHT:

Gasoline prices will reach $3.15 by the end of the year, according to Andy
Lipow, president of Lipow Oil Associates LLC. “We’re going to see significant increases in gasoline inventories the next few weeks,” he said. “Refiners will maintain their high rates of utilization while demand declines toward its seasonal low in January and February.”

image

Although low oil prices don’t necessarily mean low inflation anymore (chart from BMO Capital):

image

Nerd smile MORE ON INFLATION COMPLACENCY

U.S. Productivity Slows, Labor Costs Rise

Revised Q3 data show labor productivity among nonfarm firms rose 3.0% annualized in the quarter and unit labor costs fell 1.5%. But the quarterly data mask a clear slowing trend in productivity this year (0.3% y/y) and a pickup in unit labor costs (2.1%). The former hints at further strength in employment, as the low-hanging productivity fruit of recent years is largely picked. But, it also implies higher unit labor costs and somewhat firmer inflation in 2014. (BMO Capital)

image

The deceleration to zero productivity growth, which has a direct link to profit margins, will finally incentivize the business sector to invest organically in their own operations with belated positive implications for capex growth. (David Rosenberg)

Keep in mind that the current low labour participation rate technically means that the supply of labour is tight. And this:

On December 4th Barack Obama called for a higher federal minimum wage. He has previously suggested that it rise from $7.25 to $10.10.

Even though

In 1979 7.9% of workers toiled at or below the federal minimum wage; last year 2.8% did. From January 1st 21 states will have a minimum wage higher than the federal one. More may introduce one next year; others will raise theirs further. (The Economist)

Add that:

Mortgages To Get Pricier Next Year

Consumers can expect to pay more to get a mortgage next year, the result of changes meant to reduce the role that Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac play in the market.

The mortgage giants said late Monday that, at the direction of their regulator, they will charge higher fees on loans to borrowers who don’t make large down payments or don’t have high credit scores—a group that represents a large share of home buyers. Such fees are typically passed along to borrowers, resulting in higher mortgage rates. (…)

In updates posted to their websites on Monday, Fannie and Freddie showed that fees will rise sharply for many borrowers who don’t have down payments of at least 20% and who have credit scores of 680 to 760.

A borrower seeking a 30-year fixed-rate mortgage with a credit score of 735 and making a 10% down payment, for instance, would pay fees totaling 2% of the loan amount, up from 0.75% now. The 2% upfront fee could raise the mortgage rate by around 0.4 percentage points.

Borrowers with larger down payments could also be affected. Fees for a loan with a 690 credit score and a 25% down payment would rise to 2.25% from 1.5%. (…)

The changes follow other announcements in recent weeks that could raise loan costs for some borrowers. The Federal Housing Administration, a government agency that guarantees loans with down payments as small as 3.5%, said earlier this month that it would drop the maximum loan limit in around 650 counties. In San Bernardino, Calif., for example, the loan limit will fall to $335,350 next month from the current level of $500,000.

Separately, the FHFA said Monday it would study reducing the loan amounts that Fannie and Freddie guarantee by around 4%, bringing the national limit to $400,000 from its current level of $417,000. Those changes won’t take effect before October 2014, the agency said.

 U.S. mortgage applications fall in latest week: MBA

Applications for home mortgages fell last week, dropping to a multi-year low, an industry group said on Wednesday.

The Mortgage Bankers Association said its seasonally adjusted index of mortgage application activity, which includes both refinancing and home purchase demand, fell 5.5 percent to 374.6 in the week ended December 13.

The index has fallen for six of the past seven weeks. Mike Fratantoni, MBA’s vice president of research and economics, said the index dropped to its lowest “in more than a dozen years… as interest rates increased going into today’s Federal Open Market Committee meeting.”

The MBA’s seasonally adjusted index of refinancing applications fell 4.3 percent, while the gauge of loan requests for home purchases, a leading indicator of home sales, lost 6.1 percent. (Chart from CalculatedRisk)

image

 Japanese Exports Rise

The volume of merchandise exports in November—seen as a more reliable gauge of underlying strength than value terms—rose 6.1% from a year earlier, the Ministry of Finance announced Wednesday. The increase was the sharpest in a year and a half, and compares with a 4.4% rise in October.

Exports to Asia rose 5.9% in volume terms, the most in more than two and a half years, offsetting a slowdown to the U.S. and Europe.

Japanese manufacturers exported a total 512,432 automobiles in November, up 9.4% from a year earlier, the fastest rise in about a year and a half. They also shipped 67,000 motorcycles, up 7.0%, faster than the previous month’s 4.5% rise.

CHINA ECONOMY NOT ABOUT TO ACCELERATE

From CEBM Research:

The adjusted new orders manufacturing PMI between 2011 and 2013 have been significantly lower than in 2010 and remained range-bound. No sign of a breakthrough has yet been observed.

Consumption is a relatively positive component in 1Q14, as consumption
experienced a significant decrease due to the anti-corruption movement in 2013. However, based on our survey, general consumption, including
department stores, retail and restaurants, are not very strong, as the CEBM Consumption Index has hit a 6-year low. Therefore, an upside trend in consumption in 1Q14 is limited.

image

The volume of transactions in Canton Fair leads exports by 6 months.
Transaction volume Y/Y at this autumn’s Canton Fair is lower than the Fair this spring. Given this correlation, exports in 1H14 are not likely to
accelerate.

Another indicator for weakening exports is US GDP. Except 1H13, when the abnormally high growth of exports may have been due to false foreign trade to take advantage of interest rate arbitrage, US GDP Y/Y and China’s exports Y/Y are correlated. Because US GDP Y/Y is likely to be lower in the first half of 2014 and higher in the second half, Chinese exports are unlikely to accelerate in 1H14.

image

From National Bank Financial:

Year-on-year export growth has stabilized at around 8% overall, or
roughly 5% excluding exports to Hong Kong. And with the yuan now at an all-time high in real effective terms according to latest data from the Bank of International Settlements, it will be a tall order for exporters to increase growth over the coming years.

image

CHINA’S DOMESTIC ECONOMY HAS ITS OWN HEADWINDS

Samsung Shifts Plants From China to Protect Margins

Samsung Electronics Co. (005930) built the world’s largest smartphone business by tapping China’s cheap and abundant workforce. Not for much longer: it’s shifting output to Vietnam to secure even lower wages and defend profit margins as growth in sales of high-end handsets slows.

By the time a new $2 billion plant reaches full production in 2015, China’s communist neighbor will be making more than 40 percent of the phones that generate the majority of Samsung’s operating profit. The Suwon, South Korea-based company’s second handset factory in Vietnam is due to begin operations in February, according to a Nov. 22 statement on the local government’s website. (…)

“The trend of companies shifting to Vietnam from China will likely accelerate for at least two to three years, largely because of China’s higher labor costs,” said Lee Jung Soon, who leads a business-incubation team of the Korea Trade-Investment Promotion Agency in Ho Chi Minh City. “Vietnam is really aggressive in fostering industries now.” (…)

Intel, the world’s largest chipmaker, opened a $1 billion assembly and testing plant in Ho Chi Minh City in 2010. Nokia said its facility near Hanoi producing Asha smartphones and feature handsets became fully operational in the third quarter. LG Electronics Inc. (066570), Samsung’s smaller South Korean rival, is building a new 400,000 square meter complex to make TVs and appliances as part of a $1.5 billion investment plan. (via Grant Williams)

China November Homes Prices Rise as Shenzhen Posts Record Gain

Shenzhen and Guangzhou posted increases of 21 percent from a year earlier, while prices climbed 18 percent in Shanghai and 16 percent in Beijing, data from the National Bureau of Statistics showed today. Prices rose from a year earlier in 69 of 70 cities tracked by the government last month, it showed.

The value of November home sales climbed to the highest in almost two years, to 720.4 billion yuan($119 billion), the statistics bureau said last week.

 

CHINA FLASH MANUFACTURING PMI AT 50.5

The December HSBC Flash China Manufacturing PMI reading slowed marginally from November’s final reading. But it still stands above the average reading for 3Q, implying that the recovering trend of the
manufacturing sector starting from July still holds up.

  • Flash China Manufacturing PMI™ at 50.5 in December (50.8 in November). Three-month low.
  • Flash China Manufacturing Output Index at 51.8 in December (52.2 in November). Two-month low.

image

image

 

NEW$ & VIEW$ (10 DECEMBER 2013)

Small Businesses Optimism Up Slightly

Owner sentiment increased by 0.9 points to 92.5, a dismal reading as has
been the case since the recovery started. Over half of the improvement was accounted for by the labor market components which is certainly good news, lifting them closer to normal levels. Expected business conditions though deteriorated further – lots of dismal views of the economy coming next year. The Index has stayed in a “trading range” between 86.4 and 95.4 since the recovery started, poor in comparison to an average reading of 100 from 1973 through 2007.

Small business optimism report data through November 2013

The net percent of all owners (seasonally adjusted) reporting higher
nominal sales in the past 3 months compared to the prior 3 months was
unchanged at a negative 8 percent. Fifteen percent still cite weak sales as
their top business problem, but is the lowest reading since June 2008. The
net percent of owners expecting higher real sales volumes rose 1 point to 3 percent of all owners after falling 6 points in October (seasonally adjusted), a weak showing.

image

The pace of inventory reduction continued with a seasonally adjusted net
negative 7 percent of all owners reporting growth in inventories, 1 point
worse than in October. The negative outlook for the economy and real
sales prospects adversely impacted inventory satisfaction. The net percent
of owners viewing current stocks as too low improved only 1 point, to
negative 4 percent in November. Inventories are too large, especially given the poor outlook for sales improvements. The net percent of owners
planning to add to inventory stocks was a net 0 percent (up 1 point), no
new orders for inventory when stocks are excessive compared to expected
sales.

image

image

 

WEEKLY CHAIN STORE SALES SHOW NO HOLIDAY CHEERS

Sales dropped 1.6% last week after the 2.8% decline the previous week. The growth in the 4-week m.a. is 2.2% YoY. It was 3.0% at the same time last year when the Christmas season sales finished up 3.3% by this measure.

image

 

Smile Americans Regain Some Wealth

The net worth of U.S. households and nonprofit organizations—the values of homes, stocks and other assets minus debts and other liabilities—rose 2.6%, or about $1.9 trillion, in the third quarter of 2013 to $77.3 trillion, the highest on record, according to the Federal Reserve.

cat

The value of stocks and mutual funds owned by households jumped $917 billion last quarter, while the value of residential real estate grew about $428 billion, according to the Fed. (…)

Sad smile Wealthy Go Frugal This Holiday Amid Uneven U.S. Recovery

(…) Coach Inc. has said customers plan to spend less on gifts and that mall traffic fell sharply last month. Analysts predict Nordstrom Inc.’s fourth-quarter sales may grow less than half the year-ago pace of 6.1 percent. Tiffany & Co.’s third-quarter comparable sales in the Americas were barely higher. Even before Black Friday, Saks Inc., Neiman Marcus Group Inc. and Nordstrom offered 40 percent off on many brands. (…)

In early October, Unity Marketing conducted an online survey of 1,200 affluent shoppers. Twenty five percent said they’ll spend less on holiday gifts this year than they did in 2012, while 60 percent said they plan to spend the same. Just 13 percent said they would spend more.

Half the respondents said the financial health of the country is worse now than it was three months ago. (…)

First rise in US mortgage debt since 2008
Consumer spending may support economic growth next year

The US has reached an important milestone in its recovery from the financial crisis after the first rise in outstanding mortgage debt since the beginning of 2008.

After reducing debt for 21 consecutive quarters, US households increased their net mortgage liabilities at an annualised rate of 0.9 per cent in the third quarter of 2013, according to new data from the US Federal Reserve. (…)

Total household credit grew at an annualised pace of 3 per cent, a little slower than the growth of nominal GDP, while credit in the business sector expanded at a pace of 7.5 per cent. (…)

Canada’s top 1% take home 10.6% of its income

A first glimpse of how top earners fared in 2011 shows their share of income peaked in 2006 at 12.1 per cent, before the recession walloped the wealthy as investment income and bonuses dried up. However, the share is still higher than when Statistics Canada began tracking incomes in 1982, when it stood at 7.1 per cent. (…)

In the U.S., the income share of the top 1 per cent of earners was 19.7 per cent in 2011, according to economists Emmanuel Saez and Thomas Piketty. By last year, it had grown to about 22.5 per cent – a similar level to both before the recession and the Great Depression. The economists found that incomes for the top 1 per cent grew by nearly a third between 2009 and 2012, compared with 0.4-per-cent growth for the bottom 99 per cent.

In Canada, the threshold to be in the top percentile of earners rose to $209,600 in 2011, up from $207,300 a year earlier in constant dollars. It requires $108,300 to be part of the top 5 per cent, while it takes $84,100 to be in the top decile of earners.

The rich typically pay a higher share of taxes in Canada, although that share has declined in recent years. The top 1 per cent of earners paid 20.8 per cent of the total share of federal and provincial or territorial income taxes, down from 23.3 per cent five years earlier. (…)

The top 5 per cent of earners in Canada held 23.8 per cent of total income in 2011, while the top 10 per cent received 35.1 per cent. The report is based on 2011 tax-file data, which includes incomes from earnings and investments, but is not a measure of total wealth, which includes assets such as housing.

Signs Investment Slowing in China

(…) retail sales beat expectations, while investment lost momentum, a sign of progress toward the consumption-led growth policy makers have sought. Retail sales posted 13.7% annual growth in November, up from 13.3% in October, and auto sales hit a record high. (…)

Overall investment showed signs of slowing in November, though real-estate sales and construction starts were strong. Fixed-asset investment was up 19.9% in the first 11 months of the year, compared with the same period of 2012, just below expectations and lower than the figure for the January-to-October period. (…)

Growth in industrial production, the most closely watched monthly indicator of economic performance, slipped back to 10% on a year-to-year basis in November from 10.3% the previous month. (…)

Auto  China Auto Sales Gain 16% as Japan Automakers Extend Recovery

China’s passenger-vehicle sales rose 16 percent in November as Japanese automakers extended their recovery in the world’s largest auto market.

Wholesale deliveries of cars, multipurpose and sport utility vehicles climbed to 1.7 million units last month, the state-backed China Association of Automobile Manufacturers said today. (…)

Industrywide, total sales of vehicles — including buses and trucks — reached 19.9 million units this year through November, putting China on course to be the first country to ever see 20 million units in annual vehicle sales. (…)

By contrast, Indian passenger-vehicle sales fell 10 percent last month, the third-straight decline, according to data released by the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers today.

Ghost  France’s Industrial Production fell 0.3% in October, following a 0.3% decline in September.

SENTIMENT WATCH

over the past 3 weeks a cumulative ~15B flowed into equity mutual funds while-$17B flowed out of Bond Mutual funds. (ISI)

 

CHINA MANUFACTURING PMI STABLE AT 50.8

After adjusting for seasonal factors, the HSBC Purchasing Managers’ Index™ (PMI™) posted at 50.8 in November, up slightly from the earlier flash reading, and little-changed from 50.9 October. Though marginal, it was the second-highest index reading in eight months.

image

Production levels at Chinese manufacturers increased for the fourth month running in November, and at the fastest rate since March. Growth was supported by a quicker expansion of total new business. That was despite new export orders rising at a fractional pace, suggesting that new order growth was largely driven by domestic demand.

Despite the greater volume of new business, manufacturers cut their staffing levels in November, reversing a slight expansion of payroll numbers in October. That said, the rate of job shedding was only
marginal, with a number of panellists citing company down-sizing policies and the non-replacement of voluntary leavers.

Consequently, backlogs of work continued to increase in November. Moreover, the rate of backlog accumulation was the second-strongest in over two years. (…)

Firms chose to partially pass on their higher cost burdens to clients in November, and raised their selling prices marginally. Moreover, it was the weakest rate of output charge inflation in four months, with some firms lowering their prices in an effort to boost sales.

The official PMI came in unchanged at 51.4 in November but revealed a second straight month of decline in the new orders sub-index, which dropped to 52.3 from 52.5 though export new orders were slightly higher, rising to 50.6 from 50.4.

The sub-index for smaller companies was much weaker at 48.3, down from 48.5 and losing ground for the fourth straight month. The measure for large companies was at a 19-month high, however, at 52.4 and up from 52.3 the previous month.

 

NEW$ & VIEW$ (21 NOVEMBER 2013)

Sales Brighten Holiday Mood

The government’s main gauge of retail sales, encompassing spending on everything from cars to drinks at bars, rose a healthy 0.4% from September, despite the partial government shutdown that sent consumer confidence tumbling early in the month. Sales climbed in most categories, with gains in big-ticket items as well as daily purchases such as groceries. (…)

Wednesday’s report showed some clear pockets of strength: Sales of cars rose at the fastest pace since the early summer. Sales in electronics and appliance stores also rose robustly. Stores selling sporting goods, books, and music items saw business grow at the fastest pace in more than a year.

image

High five Let’s not get carried away. Car sales have been slowing sequentially lately and are near their past cyclical peaks if we consider the early 2000s sales levels abnormally high (internet and housing bubbles, mortgage refis) (next 2 charts from CalculatedRisk):

image

image

Meanwhile, core sales ex-cars remain on the weak side as this Doug Short chart shows:

image

Consumer Prices Ease Amid Lower Fuel Costs

The consumer-price index rose only 1% in October from the same month last year, the smallest 12-month increase since October 2009, the Labor Department said Wednesday. Core prices, which exclude volatile food and energy costs, rose 1.7% from a year ago, similar to the modest gains seen in recent months. The Fed targets an annual inflation rate of 2%.

Prices fell 0.1% last month from September, the first drop since April. Core prices increased 0.1%.

Last month, the overall decrease reflected gasoline prices, which were down 2.9% for the month. (Chart from Haver Analytics)

High five Let’s not get carried away. Core inflation remains surprisingly resilient given the weakness of the economy and the large output gap. On a YoY basis, core CPI is stuck within 1.6% and 1.8% and the Cleveland Fed median CPI just won’t slip below 2.0%. Looking at monthly trends, core CPI has slowed to 0.1% over the last 3 months from 0.2% in the previous 3 months. Yet, the median CPI only slowed to 0.1% MoM last month after a long string of 0.2% monthly gains. The inflation jury is still out.

image

Pointing up No Renaissance for U.S. Factory Workers as Pay Stagnates

(…) The average hourly wage in U.S. manufacturing was $24.56 in October, 1.9 percent more than the $24.10 for all wage earners. In May 2009, the premium for factory jobs was 3.9 percent. Weighing on wages are two-tier compensation systems under which employees starting out earn less than their more experienced peers did, and factory-job growth in the South.

Since the U.S. recession ended in June 2009, for example, Tennessee has added more than 18,000 manufacturing jobs, while New Jersey lost 17,000. Factory workers in Tennessee earned an average of $54,758 annually in 2012, almost 10 percent less than national levels and trailing the $76,038 of their New Jersey counterparts, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics. (…)

Some of the states where factory jobs are growing the fastest are among the least unionized. In 2012, 4.6 percent of South Carolina workers were represented by unions, as did 6.8 percent of Texans, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. New York, the most-unionized, was at 24.9 percent.

Assembly workers at Boeing’s nonunion plant in North Charleston, South Carolina, earn an average of $17 an hour, compared with $27.65 for the more-experienced Machinists-represented workforce at the company’s wide-body jet plant in Everett, Washington, said Bryan Corliss, a union spokesman. (…)

In Michigan, which leads the U.S. with 119,200 factory jobs added since June 2009, automakers are paying lower wage rates to new hires under the United Auto Workers’ 2007 contracts. New UAW workers were originally paidas little as $14.78 when the contract was ratified in 2011, which is about half the $28 an hour for legacy workers. Wages for some of those lower-paid employees have since risen to about $19 an hour and the legacy rate hasn’t increased. (…)

General Electric Co. says it has added about 2,500 production jobs since 2010 at its home-appliance plant in Louisville, Kentucky. Under an accord with the union local, new hires make $14 an hour assembling refrigerators and washing machines, compared with a starting wage of about $22 for those who began before 2005. While CEO Jeffrey Immelt has said GE could have sent work on new products to China, it instead invested $1 billion in its appliance business in the U.S. after the agreement was reached.

The company is also moving work to lower-wage states. In Fort Edward, New York, GE plans to dismiss about 175 employees earning an average of $29.03 an hour and shift production of electrical capacitors to Clearwater, Florida. Workers there can earn about $12 an hour, according to the United Electrical, Radio and Machine Workers of America, which represents the New York employees. (…)

Existing Home Sales Fall 3.2%

Sales of previously owned homes slipped for the second consecutive month in October, the latest sign that increased interest rates are cooling the housing recovery.

Existing-home sales declined 3.2% in October to a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 5.12 million, the National Association of Realtors said Wednesday. The results marked the slowest sales pace since June.

The federal government shutdown last month pushed some transactions into November, Realtors economist Lawrence Yun said. The Realtors group reported that 13% of closings in October were delayed either because buyers couldn’t obtain a government-backed loan or the Internal Revenue Service couldn’t verify income.

The number of homes for sale declined 1.8% from a month earlier to 2.13 million at the end of October. The inventory level represents a five-month supply at the current sales pace. Economists consider a six-month supply a healthy level.

Americans Recover Home Equity at Record Pace

The number of Americans who owe more on their mortgages than their homes are worth fell at the fastest pace on record in the third quarter as prices rose, a sign supply shortages may ease as more owners are able to sell.

The percentage of homes with mortgages that had negative equity dropped to 21 percent from 23.8 percent in the second quarter, according to a report today from Seattle-based Zillow Inc. The share of owners with at least 20 percent equity climbed to 60.8 percent from 58.1 percent, making it easier for them to list properties and buy a new place. (…)

Fingers crossed“The pent-up demand from people who now have enough equity to sell their homes will help next year,” said Lawler, president of Lawler Economic & Housing Consulting LLC in Leesburg, Virginia. “We’ll see the effect during the spring selling season. Not a lot of people put their homes on the market during the holidays.” (…)

About 10.8 million homeowners were underwater on their mortgages in the third quarter, down from 12.2 million in the second quarter, Zillow said. About 20 million people had negative equity or less than 20 percent equity, down from 21.5 million in the prior three months. Las Vegas, Atlanta, and Orlando, Florida, led major metropolitan areas with the highest rates of borrowers with less than 20 percent equity. (…)

DRIVING BLIND, TOWARDS THE WALL

Fed Casts About for Bond-Buy Endgame

Federal Reserve officials, mindful of a still-fragile economy, are laboring to devise a strategy to avoid another round of market turmoil when they pull back on one of their signature easy-money programs.

Minutes of the Oct. 29-30 policy meeting, released Wednesday, showed officials continued to look toward ending the bond-buying program “in coming months.” But they spent hours game-planning how to handle unexpected developments and tailoring a message to the public to soften the impact of the program’s end. (…)

Fed officials are hoping their policies will play out like this: The economy will improve enough in the months ahead to justify pulling back on the program, which has been in place since last year and has boosted the central bank’s bondholdings to more than $3.5 trillion. After the program ends, they will continue to hold short-term interest rates near zero as the unemployment rate—which was 7.3% last month—slowly declines over the next few years. (…)

One scenario getting increased attention at the Fed: What if the job market doesn’t improve according to plan and the bond program becomes ineffective for addressing the economy’s woes? The minutes showed their solution might be to replace the program with some other form of monetary stimulus. That could include a stronger commitment to keep short-term interest rates low far into the future, a communications strategy known as “forward guidance.”

Top Fed officials have been signaling in recent weeks that their emphasis is shifting away from the controversial bond-buying program and toward these verbal commitments to keep rates down. (…)

Punch The reality is that, do what you want, say what you want, market rates are market rates.

Millennials Wary of Borrowing, Struggling With Debt Management

Young people are becoming warier of borrowing — but they’re also getting worse at paying bills.

(…) Total debt among young adults actually dropped in the last decade to the lowest level in 15 years, separate government data show, with fewer young adults carrying credit-card balances and one in five not having any debt at all.

And yet, Millennials appear to be running into more trouble when paying their bills — whether on credit cards, auto loans, or student loans.

Millennial borrowers are late on debt payments roughly as much as older Gen-X borrowers, Experian’s data show. Millennials also use a high share of their potential borrowing capacity on cards, just like Gen-Xers, meaning they’re as likely to max out on cards.

Since Millennials tend to have fewer assets than Gen-Xers and other generations, as well as shorter credit histories, they end up with the worst average credit score — 628 — of any demographic group.

Pointing upMillennials have “the worst credit habits,” and are “struggling the most with debt management,” Experian said in a report.

(…) A study by the Federal Reserve Bank of New York recently suggested high student-loan balances may have encouraged young adults to reduce their credit-card balances between 2005 and 2012.

Other young adults may be less willing to take risksin a weak economy, whether by splurging on furniture for a new apartment, moving geographically or starting businesses — things that often require debt.

What Experian’s data suggest is that the Millennials who are in fact borrowing are struggling to do so responsibly, at least partly because of the nation’s 7.3% jobless rate, sub-3% growth and $1 trillion student-loan tab — all things that are weighing disproportionately on young people, especially those without college degrees.

As the Journal reported last week, the share of student-loan balances that were 90 or more days overdue in the third quarter rose to 11.8% from 10.9%, even as late payments on other debts dropped. While the incidence of late payments on Millennials’ overall debts isn’t alarming yet, it’s big enough to drag down their credit scores, Experian said. (…)

Thumbs up Thumbs down TIME TO BE SENTIMENTAL?

In December 2010, I wrote INVESTOR SENTIMENT SURVEYS: DON’T BE TOO SENTIMENTAL!, warning people not to give much weight to bullish sentiment readings:

I have analyzed 30 years of data plotting the II bull-bear % difference against the DJ Total Stock Market Index of 5000 US stocks. Extreme readings are above +/-25%. However, I have easily identified 11 periods when the “contrary” indicator rose to cross the extreme +30% level which were followed by strongly rising markets. Obviously not useful on that side of the ledger. (…)

Overall, never mind the extreme positives, they are essentially useless. The extreme negatives (bullish) are few but generally very good although some require patience and staying power.

My analysis was based on relative bullishness, bulls minus bears like in the chart below, but Barclays here takes another angle looking at the absolute level of bears:

According to the US Investors’ Intelligence Survey there are currently 40% more bulls than bears. At the end of August, the same survey indicated just 13.4% more bulls that bears. Global equities have rallied by 9% since then. Other measures also confirm this bullish hue, but none have displayed anything close to the relationship that the Investors’ Intelligence Survey has had recently with forward returns.

image

Here’s the more interesting part:

Closer examination reveals that the reading on “bearishness” has a better contrarian relationship with subsequent forward returns. Currently only 16% of respondents describe themselves as “bears”. Since the beginning of 2009, when there have been less than 18% bears, the market has been lower six months later on each occasion. Given that the period since 2009 has been a strong bull market, sentiment extremes have provided a good “call” on the market.

image

GOOD READ: ASSESSING THE PARTY’S DECISIONS

CLSA’s Andy Rothman is one of the most astute analyst living in China:

China’s leaders have issued strong statements in support of private enterprise and the rights of migrant workers and farmers which, if implemented effectively, will facilitate continued economic growth and social stability.  By announcing relaxation of the one-child policy and the abolishment of ‘re-education through labor’, the Party acknowledged it needs to curb human rights abuses and re-establish trust.  The creation of new groups to coordinate economic and national security policy signal that Xi Jinping has quickly consolidated his power as Party chief, raising the odds that the decisions announced Friday will be implemented quickly.

The brief, initial communique issued when the Party Plenum closed last Tuesday was dense, obtuse and packed with outdated political slogans.  But the more detailed ‘decision document’ published Friday was, for a Communist Party report, unusually clear, particularly in its support for private enterprise and markets.

Strong support for entrepreneurs

The most important signal from the Party leadership was strong support for the private sector and markets. Private firms already account for 80% of urban employment and 90% of new job creation, as well as two-thirds of investment in China, so improving the operating environment for entrepreneurs is key to our relatively positive outlook for the country’s economic future.  Friday’s document did not disappoint in this respect.

Although the Party still cannot rise to the challenge of actually using the Chinese characters for ‘private’ sector’, continuing to refer to it as ‘non-public’, they did pledge to ‘unwaveringly encourage, support and guide the development of the non-public economy’, and declared that ‘property rights in the non-public economy may equally [with the state sector] not be violated.’

In Friday’s document, the Party said it would ‘reduce central government management over micro-level matters to the broadest extent’, called for an end to ‘excessive government intervention’, and said that ‘resource allocation [should be] based on market principles, market prices and market competition.’  The world’s largest Communist Party declared that ‘property rights are the core of ownership systems’, and called for ‘fair competition, free consumer choice, autonomous consumption, [and] free circulation of products and production factors.’  The document also says China will ‘accelerate pricing reform of natural resources’ to ‘completely reflect market supply and demand’, as well as the costs of environmental damage.

The Party also pledged to reduce red tape and administrative hurdles to doing business.  Zhang Mao, the head of the State Administration for Industry and Commerce, explained that ‘registering a business will become much more convenient in the near future.’  And Miao Wei, minister for industry and information technology, announced that implementation of the plenum decision would lead his agency to eliminate at least 30% of administrative approval procedures by the end of 2015.

Friday’s document called for better protection of intellectual property rights, as well as the ‘lawful rights and interests of investors, especially small and mid-sized investors.’  The Party said it would create a ‘marketized withdrawal system where the fittest survive’, and a better bankruptcy process.

Party leaders did say that public ownership would remain ‘dominant’, but they clearly didn’t mean it.  Repeating this language, especially in light of the fact that private firms are already dominant, is, in our view, just a rhetorical bone thrown to officials whose political or financial fortunes are tied to state-owned enterprises. (…)

 

The Party did, however, raise the share of SOE income that has to be paid into the national security fund to 30% by 2020, up from 10-20% now.

In what may be a warning that serious SOE reform is likely down the road, the Party did call for the elimination of ‘all sorts of sector monopolies, and an end to ‘preferential policies . . . local protection . . . monopolies and unfair competition.’

Hukou reform coming

If the most important message from the plenum is renewed support for the private sector, a close second is the decision to reform the hukou, or household registration system.  This is important because there are more than 230m urban residents without an urban hukou, accounting for one-third of the entire urban population.

According to the official news agency, Xinhua, ‘Friday’s document promised to gradually allow eligible rural migrants to become official city residents, accelerate reform in the hukou system to fully remove restrictions in towns and small cities, gradually ease restriction in mid-sized cities, setting reasonable conditions for settling in big cities while strictly controlling the population in megacities.’ (…)

Hukou reform will be expensive, but the Party has no choice but to provide migrant workers and their families with equal access to education, health care and other urban social services.  In cases where local governments cannot afford these services, the central government will transfer the necessary funds.  Hukou reform will be rolled out gradually, and in our view:

Will reduce the risk of social instability from the 234m people living in cities who face de jure discrimination on a daily basis, particularly in eligibility for social services.

May increase the supply of migrant workers in cities at a time when the overall labour force is shrinking.

Should improve consumption by strengthening the social safety net for migrants, which will increase transfer payments and reduce precautionary savings.

Should result in higher productivity in manufacturing and construction by reducing worker turnover, and by creating a better-educated workforce. (…)

The one-child policy will be relaxed by ‘implementation of a policy where it is permitted to have two children if either a husband or a wife is an only child,’ a change from the current rules which require both the husband and wife to be only-children in order to qualify to have a second child.

Wang Peian, the deputy director of the national health and family planning committee, said that the Party will allow each province to decide when to switch to the new policy, but Friday’s announcement, in our view, spells the rapid end of the one-child policy.

Wang Feng, one of China’s leading demographers, told us over the weekend that Friday’s announcement was a ‘decisive turning point.’  But he also reminded us that in a May CLSA U report, he explained why ending the one-child policy is likely to result in a temporary uptick in the number of births, but is unlikely to change the longer-term trend towards a lower fertility rate.  The current fertility rate of 1.5 could drop even lower in the future, closer to Japan and South Korea’s 1.3, as the pressures of modern life lead Chinese couples to have smaller families. (…)

Xi consolidates power

The plenum decided to create two new groups within the government, a National Security Council and the Leading Small Group for the Comprehensive Deepening of Reform.  This signals that Party chief Xi Jinping has quickly and effectively consolidated his political power, far beyond, apparently, what his predecessor Hu Jintao was able to achieve.  This bodes well for Xi’s ability to implement the reform decisions announced Friday. (…)

 

CHINA FLASH PMI DIPS TO 50.4 IN NOVEMBER

  • Flash China Manufacturing PMI™ at 50.4 (50.9 in October). Two-month low.
  • Flash China Manufacturing Output Index at 51.3 (51.1 in October). Eight-month high.
  • Softer new orders. New export orders dip below 50.

China’s growth momentum softened a little in November, as the HSBC Flash China Manufacturing PMI moderated due to the weak new export orders and slowing pace of restocking activities. That said, this is still the second-highest PMI reading in seven months. The muted inflationary pressures should enable Beijing to keep policy relatively accommodative to support growth.

image

image

 

NEW$ & VIEW$ (11 NOVEMBER 2013)

DRIVING BLIND

 

Jobs Strength Puts Fed on Hot Seat

The U.S. job market showed surprising resilience in October, rekindling debate about whether the economy is strong enough for the Federal Reserve to rein in its signature easy-money program.

The Labor Department reported that U.S. employers added 204,000 jobs last month, defying expectations for weaker hiring amid the shutdown and a debt-ceiling fight that knocked down consumer and business confidence.

Among the most encouraging revelations in the jobs report were upward revisions to government estimates of job growth in August and September, before the government shutdown, easing worries about a renewed slowdown in the labor market.

The 204,000 jump in nonfarm payrolls came on top of upward revisions of 60,000 for the two previous months.

With the revisions, the trend in job creation looks notably better than it did just a few weeks ago. The latest report showed that payroll employment grew by an average of just less than 202,000 jobs per month in the past three months. The previous jobs report, released Oct. 22, showed job growth had averaged 143,000 per month over the prior three-month period.

See the impact before and after the revisions. The “summer lull” was shallower and employment growth could be turning up:

image  image

However,

The latest figures included a number of statistical quirks that will likely lead Fed officials to be even more cautious than usual about inferring too much from a single month’s jobs report. For example, the timing of the delayed monthly hiring survey might have skewed the data.

And these peculiar stats:

Retail boom coming to a store near you?

Pointing up CalculatedRisk writes that according to the BLS, retailers hired seasonal workers in October at the highest level since 1999. This may have to do with these announcements posted here on Oct. 1st.:

Amazon to Hire 70,000 Workers For Holiday Selling Season

Amazon plans to hire 70,000 seasonal workers for its U.S. warehouse network this year, a 40% increase that points to the company’s upbeat expectations about the holiday selling season. (…)

Wal-Mart, for instance, said this week it will add about 55,000 seasonal workers this year and Kohl’s Corp. is targeting 50,000. Target Corp.’s estimated 70,000 in seasonal hires is 20% lower than last year, the company said, reflecting the desire by employees to log more hours at work.

Punch But, out there, in Real-Land, this is what’s happening:

Personal spending, a broad measure of consumer outlays on items from refrigerators to health care, rose 0.2% in September from a month earlier, the Commerce Department said Friday. While that was in line with economists’ forecast of a 0.2% increase and matched the average rise over the July-through-September period, it is still a tepid reading when taken in broader context.

This is in nominal dollars. In real terms, growth is +0.1% for the month and +0.3% over 3 months. While the rolling 3-month real expenditures are still showing 1.8% YoY growth, the annualized growth rate over the last 3 and 6 months has been a tepid 1.2%.

image

Here’s the trend in PDI and “department store type merchandise” sales. Hard to see any reason for retailers’ enthusiasm.image

Confused smile More quirks:

The weirdness was in the household survey, which showed a 735,000 plunge in employment, mainly 507,000 workers who were kept home by the federal government’s partial shutdown. But private employment was down 9,000, while the Bureau of Labor Statistics counted a massive exodus of 720,000 folks from the workforce.

Accordingly, the six-month average through October now comes to an increase of 174,000, basically the same as the six-month average through September of 173,000.

From the GDP report:

Consumer spending rose at an annualised rate of just 1.5%, down from 1.8% in the second quarter and 2.3% in the first three months of the year. The increase was the smallest for just over three years and considerably
below the 3.6% average seen in the 15 years prior to the financial crisis.

 

image

 

In a nutshell, the BLS reports a surge in jobs thanks largely to accelerating retail employment that is not supported by actual trends in consumer expenditures nor by their ability to spend.

Fingers crossed POTENTIAL SAVIOR:image

But there is also this:

October Housing Traffic Weakest In Two Years On “Broad-Based” Housing Market Slowdown

In case the world needed any additional proof that the latest housing bubble (not our words, Fitch’s) was on its last legs, it came earlier today from Credit Suisse’ Dan Oppenheim who in his monthly survey of real estate agents observed that October was “another weak month” for traffic, with “pricing power fading as sluggish demand persists.” (…)

Oppenheim notes that the “weakness was again broad-based, and particularly acute in Seattle, Orlando, Baltimore and Sacramento…. Our buyer traffic index fell to 28 in October from 36 in September, indicating weaker levels below agents’ expectations (any reading below 50). This is the lowest level since September 2011.”

Other notable findings:

  • The Price appreciation is continuing to moderate: while many markets saw home prices rising if at a far slower pace, 7 of the 40 markets saw sequential declines (vs. no markets seeing declines in each of the past 8 months). Agents also noted increased use of incentives. Tight inventory levels remain supportive, but are being outweighed by lower demand.
  • Longer time needed to sell: it took longer to sell a home in October as our time to sell index dropped to 42 from 57 (below a neutral 50). This is  typically a negative indicator for near-term home price trends.

Nonetheless:

U.S. Stocks Rise as Jobs Data Offset Fed Stimulus Concern

U.S. stocks rose, pushing the Dow Jones Industrial Average to a record close, as a better-than-forecast jobs report added to signs growth is strong enough for the economy to withstand a stimulus reduction.

Nerd smile  Ray Dalio warns, echoing one of my points in Blind Thrust:

Ray Dalio’s Bridgewater On The Fed’s Dilemma: “We’re Worried That There’s No Gas Left In The QE Tank”

(…) As shown in the charts below, the marginal effects of wealth increases on economic activity have been declining significantly. The Fed’s dilemma is that its policy is creating a financial market bubble that is large relative to the pickup in the economy that it is producing. If it were targeting asset prices, it would tighten monetary policy to curtail the emerging bubble, whereas if it were targeting economic conditions, it would have a slight easing bias. In other words, 1) the Fed is faced with a difficult choice, and 2) it is losing its effectiveness.

We expect this limit to worsen. As the Fed pushes asset prices higher and prospective asset returns lower, and cash yields can’t decline, the spread between the prospective returns of risky assets and those of safe assets (i.e. risk premia) will shrink at the same time as the riskiness of risky assets will not decline, changing the reward-to-risk ratio in a way that will make it more difficult to push asset prices higher and create a wealth effect.

Said differently, at higher prices and lower expected returns the compensation for taking risk will be too small to get investors to bid prices up and drive prospective returns down further. If that were to happen, it would become difficult for the Fed to produce much more of a wealth effect. If that were the case at the same time as the trickling down of the wealth effect to spending continues to diminish, which seems likely, the Fed’s power to affect the economy would be greatly reduced. (…)

The dilemma the Fed faces now is that the tools currently at its disposal are pretty much used up, in that interest rates are at zero and US asset prices have been driven up to levels that imply very low levels of returns relative to the risk, so there is very little ability to stimulate from here if needed.  So the Fed will either need to accept that outcome, or come up with new ideas to stimulate conditions.

We think the question around the effectiveness of continued QE (and not the tapering, which gets all the headlines) is the big deal. Given the way the Fed has said it will act, any tapering will be in response to changes in US conditions, and any deterioration that occurs because of the Fed pulling back would just be met by a reacceleration of that stimulation.  So the degree and pace of tapering will for the most part be a reflection and not a driver of conditions, and won’t matter that much.  What will matter much more is the efficacy of Fed stimulation going forward. 

In other words, we’re not worried about whether the Fed is going to hit or release the gas pedal, we’re worried about whether there’s much gas left in the tank and what will happen if there isn’t.

Elsewhere:

S&P Cuts France’s Credit Rating

The firm cut France’s rating by one notch to double-A, sharply criticizing the president’s strategy for repairing the economy.

“We believe the French government’s reforms to taxation, as well as to product, services, and labor markets, will not substantially raise France’s medium-term growth prospects,” S&P said. “Furthermore, we believe lower economic growth is constraining the government’s ability to consolidate public finances.”

S&P’s is the third downgrade of France by a major ratings firm since Mr. Hollande was elected. (…)

The political situation leaves the government with little room to raise taxes, S&P said. On the spending side, the agency said the government’s current steps and future plans to cut spending will have only a modest impact, leaving the country with limited levers to reduce its deficit.

Smile with tongue out  French Credit Swaps Fall as Investors Shun Debt Downgrade

The cost of insuring against a French default fell to the lowest in more than three years, as investors ignored a sovereign-credit rating downgrade by Standard & Poor’s.

Credit-default swaps on France fell for a sixth day, declining 1 basis point to about 51 basis points at 1:45 p.m. That would be the lowest closing price since April 20, 2010. The contracts have fallen from 219 basis points on Jan. 13, 2012 when France lost its top rating at S&P.

“You need to ignore the S&P downgrade of France,” saidHarvinder Sian, fixed-income strategist at Royal Bank of Scotland Group Plc in London. “It is behind the market.”

Surprise Jump in China Exports

Exports rebounded sharply in October from a September slump as demand improved in the U.S. and Europe, a potentially positive sign for the global economic outlook.

Exports in October were up 5.6% from a year earlier, after registering a 0.3% fall in September. The median forecast of economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal was for an expansion of just 1.5%.

The news from China follows reports of a strong October performance from South Korea’s exports, up 7.3% from a year earlier, and suggests the recovery in the U.S. and elsewhere, though slow, is feeding through into increased demand for Asia’s export machine.

Shipments from China to the European Union were up 12.7% from a year earlier, while those to the U.S. were up 8.1%. But exports to Japan lagged behind, against a background of continued political tensions and a weakening of the Japanese yen.

China’s good export performance is even more striking given that last year’s figures were widely thought to have been overreported, so that growth looks weaker by comparison. Excluding that effect, real export growth could be as high as 7.6%, Mr. Kuijs estimated.

Imports to China also showed strength in October, up 7.6% from a year earlier, accelerating a bit from September’s 7.4% pace.

Surprised smile  China Auto Sales Climb at Fastest Pace in Nine Months

Wholesale deliveries of cars, multipurpose and sport utility vehicles rose 24 percent to 1.61 million units in October, according to the state-backed China Association of Automobile Manufacturers today. That compares with the median estimate of 1.5 million units by three analysts surveyed by Bloomberg News. (…)

Total sales of vehicles, including buses and trucks, rose 20 percent to 1.93 million units last month, the association said. In the first 10 months of the year, 17.8 million vehicles were delivered, with 14.5 million being automobiles.

Commercial vehicles sales increased 7.4 percent in the first 10 months of the year to 3.36 million units.

China inflation hits eight-month high amid tightening fear

China’s Inflation Picks Up

The consumer price index rose to 3.2% on a year-on-year basis in October, up from 3.1% in September. The rise was largely due to mounting food prices, which climbed 6.5%, and rising rents, according to government data released on Saturday. But it was still well within the government’s ceiling of 3.5% for the year.

Producer prices were down 1.5% year on year after moderating to a fall of 1.3% in September. This was the 20th month in a row of falling factory prices.

On a month-on-month basis, prices were even less of a concern, gaining only 0.1%.

CPI/non-food rose 1.6% YoY (same as September and vs. 1.7% a year ago), and was +0.3% MoM (+0.4% in September). Last 2 months annualized: +4.3%.

Data also showed China’s factory output rose 10.3% YoY in October. Fixed-asset investment, a key driver of economic growth, climbed 20.1% in the first 10 months. Real estate investment growth rose 19.2%, while property sales rose 32.3%.

Power production rode 8.4% YoY in October, compared to 8.2% in September and 6.4% a year earlier.

Retail sales were up 13.3%. Nominal retail sales growth has been stable at about 13% YoY for the past five months.

INFLATION/DEFLATION

Central Banks Renew Reflation Push as Prices Weaken

A day after the European Central Bank unexpectedly halved its benchmark interest rate to a record-low 0.25 percent and Peru cut its main rate for the first time in four years, the Czech central bank yesterday intervened in currency markets. The Reserve Bank of Australiayesterday left open the chance of cheaper borrowing costs by forecasting below-trend economic growth. (…)

Other central banks also held their fire this week. The Bank of England on Nov. 7 kept its benchmark at 0.5 percent and its bond purchase program at 375 billion pounds ($600 billion).

Malaysia held its main rate at 3 percent for a 15th straight meeting to support economic growth, rather than take on inflation that reached a 20-month high in September.

image

The Economist agrees (tks Jean):

The perils of falling inflation In both America and Europe central bankers should be pushing prices upwards

(…) The most obvious danger of too-low inflation is the risk of slipping into outright deflation, when prices persistently fall. As Japan’s experience shows, deflation is both deeply damaging and hard to escape in weak economies with high debts. Since loans are fixed in nominal terms, falling wages and prices increase the burden of paying them. And once people expect prices to keep falling, they put off buying things, weakening the economy further. There is a real danger that this may happen in southern Europe. Greece’s consumer prices are now falling, as are Spain’s if you exclude the effect of one-off tax increases. (…)

Race to Bottom Resumes as Central Bankers Ease Anew

The European Central Bank cut its key rate last week in a decision some investors say was intended in part to curb the euro after it soared to the strongest since 2011. The same day, Czech policy makers said they were intervening in the currency market for the first time in 11 years to weaken the koruna. New Zealand said it may delay rate increases to temper its dollar, and Australia warned the Aussie is “uncomfortably high.”

Canada’s housing market teeters precariously
Analysts warn nation is on verge of ‘prolonged correction’

(…) Alongside Norway and New Zealand, Canada’s overvalued property sector is most vulnerable to a price correction, according to a recent OECD report. It is especially at risk if borrowing costs rise or income growth slows.

In its latest monetary policy report, the Bank of Canada, the nation’s central bank, noted: “The elevated level of household debt and stretched valuations in some segments of the housing market remain an important downside risk to the Canadian economy.”

The riskiest mortgages are guaranteed by taxpayers through the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation, somewhat insulating the financial sector from the sort of meltdown endured by Wall Street in 2007 and 2008. But a collapse in home sales and prices would be a serious blow to consumer spending and the construction industry that employs 7 per cent of Canada’s workforce. (…)

Household debt has risen to 163 per cent of disposable income, according to Statistics Canada, while separate data show a quarter of Canadian households spend at least 30 per cent of their income on housing. This is close to the 1996 record when mortgage rates were substantially higher.

On a price-to-rent basis, which measures the profitability of owning a house, Canada’s house prices are more than 60 per cent higher than their long-term average, the OECD says. (…)

EARNINGS WATCH

From various aggregators:

  • Bloomberg:

Among 449 S&P 500 companies that have announced results during the earnings season, 75 percent beat analysts’ estimates for profits, data compiled by Bloomberg show. Growth in fourth-quarter earnings will accelerate to 6.2 percent from 4.7 percent in the previous three months, analysts’ projections show.

  • Thomson Reuters:
  • Third quarter earnings are expected to grow 5.5% over Q3 2012. Excluding JPM, the earnings growth estimate is 8.2%.
  • Of the 447 companies in the S&P 500 that have reported earnings to date for Q3 2013, 68% have reported earnings above analyst expectations. This is higher than the long-term average of 63% and is above the average over the past four quarters of 66%.
  • 53% of companies have reported Q3 2013 revenue above analyst expectations. This is lower than the long-term average of 61% and higher than the average over the past four quarters of 51%.
  • For Q4 2013, there have been 78 negative EPS preannouncements issued by S&P 500 corporations compared to 8 positive EPS preannouncements. By dividing 78 by 8, one arrives at an N/P ratio of 9.8 for the S&P 500 Index. If it persists, this will be the most negative guidance sentiment on record.
  • Zacks:

Total earnings for the 440  S&P 500 companies that have reported results already, as of Thursday morning November 7th, are up +4.6% from the same period last year, with 65.7% beating earnings expectations with a median surprise of +2.6%. Total revenues for these companies are up +2.9%, with 51.4% beating revenue expectations with a median surprise of +0.1%.

The charts below show how the results from these 440 companies compare to what these same companies reported in Q2 and the average for the last 4 quarters. The earnings and revenue growth rates, which looked materially weaker in the earlier phase of the Q3 reporting cycle, have improved.

The earnings beat ratio looks more normal now than was the case earlier in this reporting cycle. It didn’t make much sense for companies to be struggling to beat earnings expectations following the significant estimate cuts in the run up to the reporting season.


The composite earnings growth rate for Q3, combining the results from the 440 that have come out with the 60 still to come, currently remains at +4.6% on +2.9% higher revenues. This will be the best earnings growth rate of 2013 thus far, though expectations are for even stronger growth in Q4.

We may not have had much growth in recent quarters, but the expectation is for material growth acceleration in Q4 and beyond. The chart below shows total earnings growth on a trailing 4-quarter basis. The +3.1% growth rate in the chart means that total earnings in the four quarters through 2013 2Q were up by that much from the four quarters through 2012 2Q. As you can see, the expectation is for strong uptrend in the growth momentum from Q4 onwards.

Guidance has been overwhelmingly negative over the last few quarters and is not much different in Q3 either, a few notable exceptions aside.

Given this backdrop, estimates for Q4 will most likely come down quite a bit in the coming weeks. And with the market expecting the Fed to wait till early next year to start Tapering its QE program, investors may shrug this coming period of negative estimate revisions, just like they have been doing for more than a year now.

SENTIMENT WATCH

 

Stocks Regain Broad Appeal

Mom-and-pop investors are returning to stocks, but their renewed optimism is considered by many professionals to be a warning sign, thanks to a long history of Main Street arriving late to market rallies.

(…) “Frankly, from 2009 until recently, I wanted to stay very conservative,” said Chris Rouk, a technology sales manager in Irvine, Calif. Now, he said, “I want to get more aggressive.” (…)

More investors are saying they are bullish about the stock market, according to the latest poll from the American Association of Individual Investors, which found that 45% of individuals are bullish on stocks, above the long-term average of 39%. Last month, the same survey said the number of investors who said they were bearish on stocks fell to the lowest level since the first week of 2012. (…)

Flurry of Stock, Bond Issuance Is a Danger Sign for Markets

Just as financial markets were recovering from the Washington turmoil, a new danger signal has started blinking, in the form of a flood of stock and bond issues.

So far this year, U.S. companies have put out $51 billion in first-time stock issues, known as initial public offerings or IPOs, based on data from Dealogic. That is the most since $63 billion in the same period of 2000, the year bubbles in tech stocks and IPOs both popped.

Follow-on offerings by already public companies have been even larger, surpassing $155 billion this year. That is the most for the first 10-plus months of any year in Dealogic’s records, which start in 1995.

It isn’t just stock. U.S. corporate-bond issues have exceeded $911 billion, also the most in Dealogic’s database. Developing-country corporate-bond issues have surpassed $802 billion, just shy of the $819 billion in the same period last year, the highest ever. (…)

Small stocks with weak finances are outperforming bigger, safer stocks. And the risky payment-in-kind bond, which can pay interest in new bonds rather than money, is popular again. (…)

 

CHINA COMPOSITE PMI AT 51.8 IN OCTOBER

HSBC China Composite PMI™ data (which covers both manufacturing and services) signalled an expansion of output for the third consecutive month in October. Moreover, the HSBC Composite Output Index posted 51.8, up from 51.2 in September, and signalled the joint strongest rate of growth in seven months, on par with August.

image

Output increased for the third month running at manufacturers in October, with the rate of growth the strongest since April. Meanwhile, business activity continued to rise at service providers, and at a slightly
faster pace than in September. Though modest, the rate of services activity growth was one of the fastest in 2013 so far, as signalled by the HSBC China Services Business Activity Index posting at 52.6, up from 52.4 in September.

New business rose at both manufacturers and service providers during October. Goods producers recorded a moderate expansion, while service providers saw a solid increase in new work that was the fastest in seven months. Consequently, new business increased for the third successive month at the composite level, and at the quickest pace since March.

Manufacturers signalled a renewed expansion of workforce numbers in October, while employment increased for the second successive month at service providers. However, the rates of expansion were only slight in both cases. As a result, payroll numbers at the composite level increased
marginally, ending a six-month sequence of job losses.

In October, outstanding business at manufacturers rose at the fastest pace since March 2011, amid reports of improved demand. Meanwhile, service providers signalled a lower amount of backlogged work for the fifth successive month. That said, the rate of depletion was in line with the
average for the current sequence and only marginal. At the composite level, work-in-hand increased for the third month in a row and at a moderate pace.