NEW$ & VIEW$ (8 JANUARY 2014)

Companies in U.S. Added 238,000 Jobs in December, ADP Says

The 238,000 increase in employment was the biggest since November 2012 and followed a revised 229,000 gain in November that was stronger than initially estimated, according to the ADP Research Institute in Roseland, New Jersey. The December tally exceeded the most optimistic forecast in a Bloomberg survey in which the median projection called for a 200,000 advance.

Discounts drive U.S. holiday retail growth: ShopperTrak

Promotions and discounts offered by U.S. retailers drove a 2.7 percent rise in holiday season sales despite six fewer days and a cold snap that kept shoppers from stores, retail industry tracker ShopperTrak said. (…)

U.S. online retail spending rose 10 percent to $46.5 billion in the November-December 2013 holiday season, according to comScore (SCOR.O). This was below the 14 percent growth that the data firm had forecast.

ShopperTrak said shoppers spent $265.9 billion during the latest holiday period. The increase was slightly ahead of the 2.4 percent jump it had forecast in September.

ShopperTrak had forecast a 1.4 percent decline in shopper traffic.

Both retail sales and foot traffic rose 2.5 percent in the 2012 holiday season. (…)

ShopperTrak estimated on Wednesday that U.S. retail sales would rise 2.8 percent in the first quarter of 2014, while shopper traffic would fall 9 percent.

Growth Picture Brightens as Exports Hit Record

A booming U.S. energy sector and rising overseas demand brightened the nation’s trade picture in November, sharply boosting estimates for economic growth in late 2013 and raising hopes for a stronger expansion this year.

U.S. exports rose to their highest level on record in November, a seasonally adjusted $194.86 billion, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. A drop in imports narrowed the trade gap to $34.25 billion, the smallest since late 2009.

Pointing up The trade figures led many economists to sharply raise their forecasts for economic growth in the final quarter. Morgan Stanley economists raised their estimate to an annualized 3.3% from an earlier forecast of a 2.4% pace. Macroeconomic Advisers boosted its fourth-quarter projection to a 3.5% rate from 2.6%.

Fourth-quarter growth at that pace, following a 4.1% annualized increase in the third quarter, would mark the fastest half-year growth stretch since the fourth quarter of 2011 and the first quarter of 2012.

The falling U.S. trade deficit in large part reflects rising domestic energy production. U.S. crude output has increased about 64% from five years ago, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

At the same time, the U.S.’s thirst for petroleum fuels has stalled as vehicles become more efficient. As a result, refiners are shipping increasing quantities of diesel, gasoline and jet fuel to Europe and Latin America.

Petroleum exports, not adjusted for inflation, rose to the highest level on record in November while imports fell to the lowest level since November 2010.

If recent trade trends continue, Mr. Bryson said net exports could add one percentage point to the pace of GDP growth in the fourth quarter. That would be the biggest contribution since the final quarter of 2010.

Rising domestic energy production also helps in other ways, by creating jobs, keeping a lid on gasoline costs and lowering production costs for energy-intensive firms. As a result, consumers have more to spend elsewhere and businesses are more competitive internationally. (…)

U.S. exports are up 5.2% from a year earlier, led by rising sales to China, Mexico and Canada. U.S. exports to China from January through November rose 8.7% compared with the same period a year earlier. Exports to Canada, the nation’s largest trading partner, were up 2.5% in the same period. (…)

US inflation expectations hit 4-month high
Sales of Treasury inflation protected securities rise

Inflation expectations, as measured by the difference between yields on 10-year nominal Treasury notes and Treasury inflation protected securities (Tips), have risen to 2.25 per cent from a low of around 2.10 a month ago.

Aging Boomers to Boost Demand for Apartments, Condos and Townhouses

 

(…) As the boomers get older, many will move out of the houses where they raised families and move into cozier apartments, condominiums and townhouses (known as multifamily units in industry argot). A normal transition for individuals, but a huge shift in the country’s housing demand.

Based on demographic trends, the country should see a stronger rebound in multifamily construction than in single-family construction, Kansas City Fed senior economist Jordan Rappaport wrote in the most recent issue of the bank’s Economic Review. (Though he also notes slowing U.S. population growth “will put significant downward pressure on both single-family and multifamily construction.”)

Construction of multifamily buildings is expected to pick up strongly by early 2014, and single-family-home construction should regain strength by early 2015. “The longer term outlook is especially positive for multifamily construction, reflecting the aging of the baby boomers and an associated shift in demand from single-family to multifamily housing. By the end of the decade, multifamily construction is likely to peak at a level nearly two-thirds higher than its highest annual level during the 1990s and 2000s,” Mr. Rappaport wrote.

In contrast, when construction of single-family homes peaks at the end of the decade or beginning of the 2020s, he wrote, it’ll be “at a level comparable to what prevailed just prior to the housing boom.” (…)

“More generally,” Mr. Rappaport wrote, “the projected shift from single-family to multifamily living will likely have many large, long-lasting effects on the U.S. economy. It will put downward pressure on single-family relative to multifamily house prices. It will shift consumer demand away from goods and services that complement large indoor space and a backyard toward goods and services more oriented toward living in an apartment. Similarly, the possible shift toward city living may dampen demand for automobiles, highways, and gasoline but increase demand for restaurants, city parks, and high-quality public transit. Households, firms, and governments that correctly anticipate these changes are likely to especially benefit.”

Euro-Zone Retail Sales Surge

A surprise jump in retail sales across the euro zone boosts hopes that consumers may aid the hoped-for recovery.

The European Union’s statistics agency Wednesday said retail sales rose by 1.4% from October and were 1.6% higher than in November 2012. That was the largest rise in a single month since November 2001, and a major surprise. Nine economists surveyed by The Wall Street Journal last week had expected sales to rise by just 0.1%.

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The pickup was spread across the currency area, with sales up 1.5% in low-unemployment Germany, but up an even stronger 2.1% in France, where the unemployment rate is much higher and the economy weaker.

The rise in sales was also broadly based across different products, with sales of food and drink up 1.1% from October, while sales of other items were up 1.9%.

The surge in sales during November follows a long period of weakness, with sales having fallen in September and October. Consumer spending rose by just 0.1% on the quarter in the three months to September, having increased by a slightly less feeble 0.2% in the three months to June.

High five Let’s not get carried away. Sales often rebound after two weak months. Taking the last 3 months to November, totals sales rose only 0.4% or 1.6% annualized, only slightly better than the 0.8% annualized gain in the previous 3 months. Core sales did a little better with  annualized gains of 3.6% and 0.4% for the same respective periods. The most recent numbers can be revised, however.image

Markit’s Retail PMI for December was not conducive to much hoopla!

Markit’s final batch of eurozone retail PMI® data for 2013 signalled an overall decline in sales for the fourth month running. The rate of decline remained modest but accelerated slightly, reflecting a sharper contraction in France and slower growth in Germany.

Record-Low Core Inflation May Soon Push ECB to Ease Policy (Bloomberg Briefs)image

Meanwhile:

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Auto U.K. Car Sales Top Pre-Crisis Levels

U.K. registrations of new cars rose 11% in 2013 to their highest level since before the 2008 financial crisis, reflecting the country’s relatively strong economic recovery in contrast with the rest of Europe, where car demand has revived only recently from a prolonged slump.

The outlook is nonetheless for more sedate growth in the U.K. this year and next as the impact of pent-up demand for new cars fades, the U.K. Society of Motor Manufacturers and Traders, or SMMT, said on Tuesday.

Much of the increase in sales last year stemmed from the generous provision of cheap financing from the car manufacturers.

The SMMT said registrations, which mirror sales, rose to 2.26 million vehicles from 2.04 million in 2012, with registrations in December jumping 24% to 152,918, a 22nd consecutive monthly rise.

As a result, the U.K. has entrenched its position as Europe’s biggest car market after Germany and ahead of France. Germany registrations of new cars fell 4.2% to 2.95 million in 2013, despite a 5.4% gain in December. French registrations fell 5.7% last year to 1.79 million cars, although they rose 9.4% in December. The German and French data were released by the countries’ auto-making associations last week. (…)

Eurozone periphery borrowing costs fall
Yields in Spain, Portugal and Greece down after Irish bond sale

(…) The strength of demand for eurozone “periphery” debt reflected increased investor appetite for higher-yielding government bonds as well as rising confidence in the creditworthiness of eurozone economies. It improved significantly the chances of Portugal following Ireland’s example and exiting its bailout programme later this year – and of Greece also soon being able to tap international debt markets. (…)

EARNINGS WATCH

Currency Swings Hit Earnings Currency swings are still taking a toll on corporate earnings despite efforts to manage the risk. Large U.S. multinational companies reported about $4.2 billion in hits to earnings and revenue in Q3, driven mostly by swings in the Brazilian real, Japanese yen, Indian rupee and Australian dollar, CFOJ’s Emily Chasan reports. The real declined 10% against the U.S. dollar during the quarter, while the rupee hit a record low.

A total of 205 companies said currency moves had negatively affected their results in the third quarter of 2013, according to FiREapps, a foreign exchange risk-management company. “More companies are trying to manage risk…but companies are still seeing highly uncorrelated moves [against the dollar] based on swings in one currency,” said FiREapps CEO Wolfgang Koester. Companies have spent much of the year insulating themselves against big moves in the euro or the yen, but swings in the Australian dollar, rupee and real dominated discussions because they were often surprises, Mr. Koester said.

Only 78 companies quantified the impact of currencies, which translated to about 3 cents a share on average. The total was up slightly from the second quarter when 95 companies reported a total impact of $4.1 billion.

On an industry basis, car makers suddenly started disclosing more currency moves during the quarter, with 16 companies mentioning their results had been affected. Ford, for example, warned last month of the potential impact from an expected Venezuelan currency devaluation in 2014.

Thumbs down A Flurry of Downgrades Kick Off the New Year

 

Wall Street analysts have gotten back to work in the new year with a flurry of ratings changes, and they have been more bearish than bullish.  As shown in the first chart below, there have been 226 total ratings changes over the first four trading days of 2014, which is the highest reading seen since the bull market began in 2009.  We have seen 134 analyst downgrades since the start of the year, which is also the highest level seen over the first four trading days since 2009.  

In percentage terms, 2014 is starting with fewer downgrades than in 2011 or 2012 (62.7% and 60.0% respectively vs. 59.2% in 2014), but these years both had very quiet starts in terms of the total number of ratings changes.  

Record-Setting Cold Hits Eastern U.S.

A record-setting cold snap in the Midwest enveloped the eastern half of the country Tuesday, with brutally cold temperatures recorded from the deep South up to New England.

Pointing up Is China About to Let the Yuan Rise? Don’t Bank on It  China’s central bankers are beginning to think the country’s huge pile of reserves – which is still growing as authorities intervene to keep the yuan from rising too fast — is excessive. Curbing its growth could even help the economy’s transition from an export-led model to one based on domestic consumption. But the top leadership’s fear of social unrest means things are unlikely to change soon.

(…) In an effort to hold down the value of its currency and keep Chinese exports competitive, the PBOC wades into markets, buying up foreign exchange and pumping out yuan on a massive scale. The PBOC probably bought $73 billion dollars of foreign exchange in October, the most in three years, and a similar amount in November, according to Capital Economics.

Even before that, official figures showed China’s reserves had hit a record $3.66 trillion by the end of the third quarter, the bulk of it invested in U.S. dollar securities like Treasury bonds. Policymakers are beginning to wonder if that hoard is too big.

Sitting on $4 trillion might not seem like a bad position to be in, but it can make a mess of domestic monetary policy if those reserves result from the central bank’s attempts to deal with capital inflows.

To prevent the yuan from appreciating, the PBOC buys up foreign exchange using newly created domestic currency. But that can fuel domestic inflation, so the central bank “sterilizes” the new money by selling central bank bills to domestic financial institutions. That leaves these institutions with less cash for lending, pushing up domestic interest rates (and ultimately leaving the central bank with a loss on its balance sheet).

Interest rates in China already are significantly higher than in many other countries, making it a tempting target for speculative “hot money” flows, which tend to find a way in despite the country’s capital controls.

“Monetary policy gets into a conundrum,” said Louis Kuijs, an economist at RBS. “If the central bank is intervening because there are huge capital inflows, the domestic interest rate in the market will go up. The more that interest rate goes up, the more capital will be attracted. It becomes difficult for the central bank to manage.”

Yi Gang, head of the State Administration of Foreign Exchange and guardian of the treasure trove, thinks the reserves are so large they’re becoming more of a burden than an asset. In an interview last month, he told financial magazine Caixin that a further build-up would bring “fewer and fewer benefits coupled with higher and higher costs.”

Those costs include not just losses on sterilization operations but also the impact of a huge export sector on the environment, he said.

But Mr. Yi does not make the decisions, any more than his boss, PBOC Gov. Zhou Xiaochuan, has the final say on interest rates. Monetary policy in China is too big a deal to be left to the central bank; the State Council, headed by Premier Li Keqiang, has to sign off on its decisions.

The technocrats at the PBOC, financial professionals who have as much faith in markets as anyone in China’s government, might want to dial back foreign-exchange intervention. But the top leaders are leery of any move that could pose a risk to employment. If factories go out of business and jobless migrants flood the streets of Guangdong, a market-determined exchange rate will be little comfort.

To be sure, China is allowing the yuan to appreciate — just not by much. The yuan has risen nearly 13% against the U.S. dollar since authorities relaxed the currency peg in June 2010, including 3% appreciation last year. But that’s far less than it would likely rise if the market were allowed to operate freely.

Never mind that a cheap currency makes it more expensive for Chinese households and businesses to buy things from the outside world, depressing standards of living and hampering the transition to a consumer society that China’s leaders ostensibly want. The policy amounts to forced saving on a huge scale — even as the officials who manage those savings say they already have more than enough for any contingency.

Some experts think the pace of China’s FX accumulation will even increase. Capital Economics says the PBOC could amass another $500 billion over the next year. That’s what they think it will take to keep the yuan from rising to more than 5.90 to the dollar, compared with 6.10 now.

“The PBOC will have to choose between allowing significant currency appreciation and continuing to accumulate foreign assets,” Mark Williams, the firm’s chief Asia economist, wrote in a research note Monday. “We expect policymakers to opt primarily for the latter.”

Emerging Markets See Selloff

The declines come amid concerns about faltering economies and political unrest.

Investors are bailing out of emerging markets from Turkey and Brazil to Thailand and Indonesia, extending a selloff that began last year, amid concerns about faltering economies and political unrest.

The MSCI Emerging Markets Index, a gauge of stocks in 21 developing markets, slipped 3.1% in the first four trading days of 2014, building on a 5% loss in 2013. This compares with double-digit-percentage rallies in stock markets in the U.S., Japan and Europe last year.

Indonesia’s currency on Tuesday hit its lowest level against the dollar since the financial crisis in Asia trading. Meanwhile, the Turkish lira plumbed record lows against the greenback this week. (…)

In the first three trading days of the year, investors yanked $1.2 billion from the Vanguard FTSE Emerging Markets ETF, VFEM.LN +0.07% the biggest emerging-markets exchange-traded fund listed in the U.S., according to data provider IndexUniverse. That is among the biggest year-to-date outflows among all ETFs. Shares of the ETF itself are down 4.2% in 2014.

Last year, money managers pulled $6 billion from emerging-market stocks, the most since 2011, according to data tracker EPFR Global. Outflows from bond markets totaled $13.1 billion, the biggest since the financial crisis of 2008. (…)

The stocks in the MSCI Emerging Markets Index on average are trading at 10.2 times next year’s earnings, compared with a P/E of 15.2 for the S&P 500, FactSet noted. (…)

In the Philippines, an inflation reading on Tuesday reached a two-year high and provided another sell signal to currency traders given officials and economists had expected the impact from the typhoon in November to be mild on inflation. The Philippine peso has weakened 1% against the dollar since the start of the year. (…)

Mohamed El-Erian
Do not bet on a broad emerging market recovery

(…) To shed more light on what happened in 2013 and what is likely to occur in 2014, we need to look at three factors that many had assumed were relics of the “old EM”.

First, and after several years of large inflows, emerging markets suffered a dramatic dislocation in technical conditions in the second quarter of 2013.

The trigger was Fed talk of “tapering” the unconventional support the US central bank provides to markets. The resulting price and liquidity disruptions were amplified by structural weaknesses associated with a narrow EM dedicated investor base and skittish cross-over investors. Simply put, “tourist dollars” fleeing emerging markets could not be compensated for quickly enough by “locals”.

Second, 2013 saw stumbles on the part of EM corporate leaders and policy makers. Perhaps overconfident due to all the talk of an emerging market age – itself encouraged by the extent to which the emerging world had economically and financially outperformed advanced countries after the 2008 global financial crisis – they underestimated exogenous technical shocks, overestimated their resilience, and under-delivered on the needed responses at both corporate and sovereign levels. Pending elections also damped enthusiasm for policy changes.

Finally, the extent of internal policy incoherence was accentuated by the currency depreciations caused by the sudden midyear reversal in cross-border capital flows. Companies scrambled to deal with their foreign exchange mismatches while central bank interest rate policies were torn between battling currency-induced inflation and countering declining economic growth.

Absent a major hiccup in the global economy – due, for example, to a policy mistake on the part of G3 central banks and/or a market accident as some asset prices are quite disconnected from fundamentals – the influence of these three factors is likely to diminish in 2014. This would alleviate pressure on emerging market assets at a time when their valuations have become more attractive on both a relative and absolute basis.

Yet the answer is not for investors to rush and position their portfolios for an emerging market recovery that is broad in scope and large in scale. Instead, they should differentiate by favouring companies commanding premium profitability and benefiting from healthy long-run consumer growth dynamics, residing in countries with strong balance sheets and a high degree of policy flexibility, and benefiting from a rising dedicated investor base.

 

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