NEW$ & VIEW$ (6 JANUARY 2014)

Auto U.S. car sales from different prisms:

 

  • Auto Makers Rebound as Buyers Go Big 

    Five years after skyrocketing fuel prices and turmoil in financial markets knocked auto makers into a tailspin, the U.S. market has recovered to its former size and character.

(…) U.S. car and light truck sales rose less than 1% in December, reflecting in part a hangover from a surge the month before. But overall, the U.S. auto industry in 2013 had its best sales year since 2007, and industry executives said on Friday they expect gains to continue in 2014, though at a slower pace.

For the year, U.S. consumers bought 15.6 million vehicles, up 7.6% from 2012, according to market researcher Autodata Corp., the strongest volume since 2007. Purchases of light trucks including sport-utility vehicles exceeded cars, a reversal from the year earlier. (…)

But as gas prices drifted lower last year, U.S. consumers trading old vehicles for new favored pricey pickup trucks, SUVs and luxury cars. Ford, for example, boosted sales of its F-150 pickup by 8.4% in December over a year ago, while sales of its subcompact Fiesta and compact Focus cars plunged by 20% and 31% respectively. (…)

Consumers also are springing for more luxurious models, driving average new-car selling price to $32,077 in 2013, up 1.4% from a year earlier and up 10% from 2005, according to auto-price researcher KBB.com. (…)

High five December points to slower growth ahead as auto makers found gains harder to achieve against year-earlier results.

GM said its December sales fell 6.3% compared with the same month last year because of what executives said were aggressive pickup truck promotions by Ford and tougher competition from Asian auto makers.

December also marked the first monthly year-over-year decline in car sales at GM, Ford and Chrysler for 2013. Gains in pickups and SUVs offset weaker car sales at Ford and Chrysler. (…)

  • Here’s the monthly sales pattern (WardsAuto):

An expected post-Christmas surge in LV sales failed to materialize, as U.S. automakers reported 1.35 million monthly sales – an increase in daily sales of 4%. December devliveries equated to a 15.3 million-unit SAAR for the month.

ZeroHedge zeroes in on domestic car sales:

 

Via SMRA,

Nearly every automaker has reported lower-than-expected sales for the month of December relative to our forecast and the consensus. At this time, domestic light vehicle sales are running at a disappointing low 11.3 million annualized pace, which compares with 12.6 million for November.

If taken into context, we can say that the strong selling pace in November pulled sales away from December. In September and October, domestic light vehicle sales fell under 12.0 million due to the impact of the federal government shutdown, slipping to 11.7 million for both months, as it negatively impacted on buying confidence.

In November 2013, sales recovered strongly to 12.6 million, perhaps too strongly to the detriment of December’s sales. Therefore, if we average November and December together, we get 12.0 million, which is a respectable, though not spectacular, selling pace.

The times, they are a-changing:

image

Hmmm…

Total car sales using a 3-month m.a. to smooth out monthly fluctuations.

image

Girl “Daddy, is this a cyclical peak?”

image

Just kidding “May well be, but let’s hope not…”

 

From my Nov. 20 post:

The Detroit Three each reported a roughly 90 days’ supply of cars and light trucks in inventory at the end of November. Auto makers generally prefer to keep between 60 days and 80 days of sales at dealers.

Truth is, basic demand seems to be soft:

Americans Holding on to Their Cars Longer

Demand for cars has been helped by the aging of America’s vehicles.

(…) during the 2007-2009 downturn and after, financial problems and tight credit standards prevented many consumers from replacing their old vehicles. As a result, estimate analysts at IHS Automotive, the average age of a vehicle stands at a record 11.3 years. The average age increased faster in the five years ended in 2013, than in the five years before that. The trend is true for cars and for light trucks.

(…) IHS projects vehicle sales will total just over 16 million in 2014, and the new cars will help to slow the aging of America’s car fleet.

Truth is that cars do last longer.

And seems that people want, need or can only afford fewer cars (chart from ZeroHedge)

Cases in point:

Office-Rental Market Is Gaining Strength

(…) Businesses occupied an additional 8.5 million square feet of office space in the quarter. That was only a 0.25% increase from the third quarter, but Reis said it was the largest gain since the third quarter of 2007.

The expansion of tenants was offset by the completion of 9.1 million square feet of new office space during the quarter, the most since the fourth quarter of 2009, according to Reis, which tracks 79 major U.S. office markets. That left the market’s vacancy rate at 16.9%, unchanged from the previous quarter.

The vacancy rate had been steadily falling from the recent high of 17.6% in early 2011, but it still is well above the low of 12.5% in the third quarter of 2007, Reis said.

The amount of occupied office space now stands at slightly more than 3.4 billion square feet, which falls short of the market’s peak in late 2007 by 79 million square feet.

At the current rate that companies are leasing new offices—known as “positive absorption”—it would take more than two years to reach that peak level again.

(…)  Average asking rents increased in the fourth quarter to $29.07 per square foot a year, up 0.7% from the third quarter but still short of the recent high of $29.37 hit in 2008. (…)

Economic research firm Moody’s Analytics projects office-using jobs will increase 2.1% this year to nearly 33.9 million. That growth rate, along with a 2.1% gain in 2012, are the largest since last decade’s boom. “I would expect 2014 to be the best year since 2006 for office-using jobs,” says Mark Zandi, chief economist at Moody’s Analytics.

Reis’ preliminary forecast for 2014 calls for office-vacancy rates to decline by roughly half a percentage point by year’s end and asking rents to increase 2.8%, the largest gain since 2007. (…)

Alien ‘Polar Pig’ Threatens Coldest U.S. Weather in Two Decades

The coldest air in almost 20 years is sweeping over the central U.S. toward the East Coast, threatening to topple temperature records, ignite energy demand and damage Great Plains winter wheat.

Hard-freeze warnings and watches, which are alerts for farmers, stretch from Texas to central Florida. Mike Musher, a meteorologist with the U.S. Weather Prediction Center in College Park,Maryland, said 90 percent of the contiguous U.S. will be at or below the freezing mark today.

Freezing temperatures spur energy demand as people turn up thermostats to heat homes and businesses. Power generation accounts for 32 percent of U.S. natural-gas use, according to the Energy Information Administration. About 49 percent of all homes use the fuel for heating.

China Shows Signs of Slowdown

Four purchasing managers’ indexes—two compiled by the government and two by HSBC Holdings PLC all dropped last month, the first time that has happened since April. The HSBC Services PMI, released Monday, fell to 50.9 for December, compared with 52.5 the month before. (…)

All four PMIs remained in narrowly positive territory for December, indicating that expansion continues, albeit at a slow pace. But that masks difficulties for individual companies in some sectors. Conditions are worsening for small and medium-size businesses, according to the official manufacturing PMI. The subindex for large companies, which has performed best in recent months, also fell in December, though it remains above the 50 mark that separates growth from contraction.

The data show manufacturers cut back stocks of both raw materials and finished goods, suggesting they are expecting weaker sales ahead. (…)

GUIDANCE ON GUIDANCE

This is what the media have been posting from Factset in recent weeks:

For Q4 2013, 94 companies in the S&P 500 have issued negative EPS guidance and 13 companies have issued positive EPS guidance. If these are the final numbers, it will mark the highest number of companies issuing negative EPS guidance and tie the mark for the lowest number of companies issuing positive EPS guidance since FactSet began tracking the data in 2006.

The percentage of companies issuing negative EPS guidance is 88% (94 out of 107). If this is the final percentage for the quarter, it will mark the highest percentage on record (since 2006).

These following info from the same Factset release have generally been omitted by the media:

Although the number of companies that have issued negative EPS guidance is high, the amount by which these have companies have lowered expectations has been below average. For the 107 companies in
the S&P 500 that have issued EPS guidance for the third quarter, the EPS guidance has been 5.7% below the mean estimate on average. This percentage decline is smaller than the trailing 5-year average of -11.1% and trailing 5-year median of -7.8% for the index. If -5.7% is the final surprise percentage for the quarter, it will mark the lowest surprise percentage since Q2 2012 (-0.4%).

That could mean that companies are more prone to reduce guidance than before. Here’s what has happened following Q3 guidance:

At this point in time, all 114 of the companies that issued EPS guidance for Q3 2013 have reported actual results for the quarter. Of these 114 companies, 84% reported actual EPS above guidance, 9% reported
actual EPS below guidance, and 7% reported actual EPS in line with guidance. This percentage (84%) is well above the trailing 5-year average for companies issuing EPS guidance, and above the overall performance of the S&P 500 for Q2 2013.

Under-promise to over-deliver!

Companies that issued quarterly EPS guidance for Q3 reported an actual EPS number that was 9.5% above the guidance, on average. Over the past five years, companies that issued quarterly EPS guidance reported an actual EPS number that was 12.8% above the EPS guidance on average.

Now this:

For the current fiscal year, 149 companies have issued negative EPS guidance and 116 companies have issued positive EPS guidance. As a result, the overall percentage of companies issuing negative EPS
guidance to date for the current fiscal year stands at 56% (149 out of 265), which is below the percentage recorded at the end of September (61%).

Since the end of September, the number of companies issuing negative EPS guidance for the current fiscal year has decreased by eight, while the
number of companies issuing positive EPS guidance has increased by 15.

Pointing up There was a 15% increase in the number of companies issuing positive EPS guidance from the end of September through the end of December.

As a result:

Over the course of the fourth quarter, analysts have lowered earnings estimates for companies in the S&P 500 for the quarter. The Q4 bottom-up EPS estimate (which is an aggregation of the estimates for all 500 companies in the index) dropped 3.5% (to $27.90 from $28.91) from September 30 through December 31.

During the past year (4 quarters), the average decline in the EPS estimate during the quarter has been 3.9%. During the past five years (20 quarters), the average decline in the EPS estimate during the quarter has been 5.8%. During the past ten years, (40 quarters), the average decline in the EPS estimate during the quarter has been 4.3%. Thus, the decline in the EPS estimate recorded during the course of the Q4 2013 quarter was lower than the trailing 1-year, 5-year, and 10-year averages.

So, do you really want to use forward earnings in your valuation work?

Bernanke Kicks Off Farewell Tour In Philly. Some of his comments:

  • I have done my job:

At the current point in the recovery from the 2001 recession, employment at all levels of government had increased by nearly 600,000 workers; in contrast, in the current recovery, government employment has declined by more than 700,000 jobs, a net difference of more than 1.3 million jobs. There have been corresponding cuts in government investment, in infrastructure for example, as well as increases in taxes and reductions in transfers.

  • Politicians have not:

Although long-term fiscal sustainability is a critical objective, excessively tight near-term fiscal policies have likely been counterproductive. Most importantly, with fiscal and monetary policy working in opposite directions, the recovery is weaker than it otherwise would be.

  • So get to it now:

But the current policy mix is particularly problematic when interest rates are very low, as is the case today. Monetary policy has less room to maneuver when interest rates are close to zero, while expansionary fiscal policy is likely both more effective and less costly in terms of increased debt burden when interest rates are pinned at low levels. A more balanced policy mix might also avoid some of the costs of very low interest rates, such as potential risks to financial stability, without sacrificing jobs and growth.

  • That’s for you bankers as well:

The Federal Reserve now has effective tools to normalize the stance of policy when conditions warrant, without reliance on asset sales. The interest rate on excess reserves can be raised, which will put upward pressure on short-term rates;

  • Get ready for higher rates:

in addition, the Federal Reserve will be able to employ other tools, such as fixed-rate overnight reverse repurchase agreements, term deposits, or term repurchase agreements, to drain bank reserves and tighten its control over money market rates if this proves necessary. As a result, at the appropriate time, the (Fed) will be able to return to conducting monetary policy primarily through adjustments in the short-term policy rate. It is possible, however, that some specific aspects of the Federal Reserve’s operating framework will change; the Committee will be considering this question in the future, taking into account what it learned from its experience with an expanded balance sheet and new tools for managing interest rates.

Need more warning?

 

Fed’s Plosser: May Need to Employ Aggressive Tightening Campaign

(…) Mr. Plosser, who spoke as part of a panel discussion held in Philadelphia at the annual American Economic Association, will be a voting member of the monetary policy setting Federal Open Market Committee this year. (…)

Currently, the Fed expects to keep short-term rates very low until some time in 2015. The veteran central banker is uneasy with that, and warns the Fed should prepare for a faster and more aggressive campaign of rate hikes given the inflation risks presented by all the liquidity it has provided markets.

Mr. Plosser said the Fed would like to raise rates “gradually” but added “it doesn’t always work that way.”

“How fast will we have to move interest rates up…we don’t know the answer to that,” Mr. Plosser said. He warned that the Fed may have to be “aggressive,” and he added “people like to think the Fed has all this great control over interest rates, but the market does its own thing.”

JPMorgan Shows The US Is The Most Expensive Developed Market In The World

JPMorgan points out that US equities are 2 standard deviations rich to their average valuation and are in fact the most expensive in the developed world…

Punch By the way, this also impacts employment:

Foreign Companies Investing Less in the U.S.

Obama has made reversing the trend a priority.

Foreign direct investment in the U.S. appears to have dropped 11% last year, to about $148 billion, according to preliminary Commerce Department data, as analyzed by the Congressional Research Service.

This follows a decline in 2012 to about $166 billion from 2011’s estimated $230 billion. Foreign direct investment, or FDI, had peaked in the U.S. at $310 billion in 2008 and sank to about $150 billion in 2009, before rebounding in 2010 to $206 billion.

The steep fall in 2012-2013 has many possible causes, including the heated presidential elections and the knockdown, drag-out budget battles that culminated in last year’s government shutdown. Our politics frighten foreigners. We also saw tougher air-quality regulations from the Environmental Protection Agency and the new Dodd-Frank rules. Nevertheless, the U.S. last year emerged for the first time since 2001 as the most promising destination for FDI, thanks to our productivity gains, according to a survey of 302 companies from 28 countries by A.T. Kearney, a New York international consulting firm.

Obama seems to be in the mean-reverting biz now with many priorities aimed at reversing trends…(see below)

Stock Buybacks’ Allure Likely to Fade

(…) In the fourth quarter, S&P 500 companies may have bought back nearly $138 billion worth of stock, says Howard Silverblatt, Standard & Poor’s senior analyst. If that estimate proves correct as companies file their quarterly disclosures, it’ll be the biggest quarter for buybacks since 2007 and a 40% jump from the level a year ago.

Companies have already repurchased a staggering $445 billion worth of shares in the 12 months ended on Sept. 30. (…)

The S&P 500 Buyback Index, which covers the 100 companies that are the busiest buying back shares, rose 48.3% in 2013, trumping a 33.3% return for even the S&P Dividend Aristocrat Index brimming with companies that have hiked dividends every year for a quarter-century.

Conventional wisdom now expects 2014 to be an even bigger year for buybacks. After all, global growth is improving at only a drowsy pace, and receding crises heap pressure on management to spend their cash stash. Goldman Sachs, for one, sees repurchases increasing 35% this year.

(…) Rising interest rates will make it dearer for companies looking to borrow to finance buybacks or replenish their cash hoards. (…)

Besides, buybacks work better as an interim measure for returning cash to shareholders when the outlook is iffy. Today, a broadening recovery nudges management to rely less on financial engineering and to begin the riskier, tougher task of finding growth, investing in research and development, or inventing the next big thing—whether it’s ocean-driven hydropower or a cure for male-pattern baldness. Reflexively buying back shares was the easy, momentarily crowd-pleasing part. Figuring out where future growth lies and how to secure it is the real challenge that lies ahead.

BANKS

 

Biggest Lenders Keep On Growing

The five largest U.S. lenders control 44.2% of the industry’s assets, up from 43.5% in 2012 and 38.4% in 2007, according to a report by data provider SNL Financial.

The five largest U.S. lenders control 44.2% of the industry’s assets, up from 43.5% in 2012 and 38.4% in 2007, according to a report by data provider SNL Financial. That expansion has been reshaping banking since at least 1990, when the top five institutions held 9.67% of bank assets. (…)

At the same time, the number of U.S. banks fell last year to the lowest level since federal regulators began keeping track in 1934, according to the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.

There were 6,891 banks as of the third quarter, down from a peak of 18,000. Between 1984 and 2011, more than 10,000 banks disappeared through mergers or failures, according to FDIC data.

The banking units of J.P. Morgan Chase, Bank of America Corp., Citigroup Inc., Wells Fargo and U.S. Bancorp held $6.46 trillion in assets as of the third quarter, the report, released Thursday by SNL, found. The total for the rest of the banking industry, comprised of thousands of midsize, regional and smaller players, was $8.15 trillion.

Meanwhile.

Sarcastic smile Barack Obama has played 160 rounds of golf since taking office. (Time). That’s 32 per year over the past 5 years.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *