NEW$ & VIEW$ (3 JANUARY 2014)

Global Manufacturing Improves At Fastest Pace Since February 2011

The end of 2013 saw growth of the global manufacturing sector accelerate to a 32-month high. The J.P.Morgan Global Manufacturing PMI™ – a composite index produced by JPMorgan and Markit in association with ISM and IFPSM – rose to 53.3 in December, up from 53.1 in November, to signal expansion for the twelfth month in a row.

imageThe average reading of the headline PMI through 2013 as a whole (51.5) was better than the stagnation signalled over 2012 (PMI: 50.0). The rate
of expansion registered for the final quarter of 2013 was the best since Q2 2011.

Global manufacturing production expanded for the fourteenth straight month in December. Moreover, the pace of increase was the fastest since February 2011, as the growth rate of new orders held broadly steady at November’s 33-month record. New export orders rose for the sixth month running.

Output growth was again led by the G7 developed nations in December, as robust expansions in the US, Japan, Germany, the UK (which registered the highest Output PMI reading of all countries) and Italy
offset the ongoing contraction in France and a sharp growth slowdown in Canada.

Among the larger emerging nations covered by the survey, already muted rates of increase for production eased in China, India and Russia, and remained similarly modest in Brazil and South Korea despite slight  accelerations. Taiwan was a brighter spot, with output growth hitting a 32-month high.

December PMI data signalled an increase in global manufacturing employment for the sixth consecutive month. Although the rate of jobs growth was again only moderate, it was nonetheless the fastest for
almost two-and-a-half years. Payroll numbers were raised in the majority of the nations covered, including the US, Japan, Germany,
the UK, India, Taiwan and South Korea. Job losses were recorded in China, France, Spain, Brazil, Russia, Austria and Greece.

Input price inflation accelerated to a 20-month peak in December, and was slightly above the survey average. Part of the increase in costs was passed on to clients, reflected in the pace of output price inflation reaching a near two-and-a-half year peak.

U.S. Construction Spending Advances Further

The value of construction put-in-place gained 1.0% in November (5.9% y/y) following a little-revised 0.9% October rise. The September increase of 1.4% was revised up substantially from the initially-estimated 0.3% slip.

Private sector construction activity jumped 2.2% (8.6% y/y) in November after no change in October. Residential building surged 1.9% (16.6% y/y) as spending on improvements recovered 2.2% (10.2% y/y). Single-family home building activity gained 1.8% (18.4% y/y) while multi-family building rose 0.9%, up by more than one-third y/y. Nonresidential building activity surged 2.7% (1.0% y/y) paced by an 8.8% gain (37.7% y/y) in multi-retail and a 4.6% rise (11.5% y/y) in office building.

Offsetting these November gains was a 1.8% decline (-0.2% y/y) in the value of public sector building activity. (…)

Surprised smile Euro-Zone Private Lending Plunges

Lending to the private sector in the euro zone plunged in November at the sharpest annual rate since records began over 20 years ago, data from the European Central Bank showed Friday, suggesting that the region will struggle to get its anticipated economic recovery in full gear.

Private sector lending in the euro zone declined by 2.3% on the year, after a 2.2% decline in October, the ECB said. (…)

On the month, lending to households declined by 3 billion euros ($4.1 billion) reversing the €3 billion increase in October, while lending to firms fell by €13 billion, following a €15 billion drop in the previous month. Loans to firms were down by 3.9% on the year. (…)

The ECB’s broad gauge of money supply, or M3, grew by only 1.5% in November in annual terms, above the 1.4% rise in October, while the three-month average grew by 1.7%, after 1.9% in the previous month. The monetary growth data remain well below the ECB’s “reference value” of 4.5%, which it considers consistent with its price stability mandate.

Auto Decline in German car sales accelerated in 2013: KBA

The decline in German car sales accelerated last year, falling below 3 million vehicles for the first time since 2010, reflecting troubles in Europe that have sent auto demand close to a two-decade low.

New car registrations in Germany fell 4.2 percent to 2.95 million last year, the German Federal Motor Transport Authority (KBA) said, after a decline of 2.9 percent in 2012.

Germany’s premium carmakers BMW (BMWG.DE), Mercedes-Benz (DAIGn.DE) and Audi (NSUG.DE) each lost market share, suffering sales declines of 5.8 percent, 1.4 percent and 5.5 percent respectively. (…)

German mass market brand Opel, owned by General Motors (GM.N), lost 2.9 percent market share last year while Volkswagen (VOWG_p.DE) sales fell by 4.6 percent in its home market. (…)

Imported volume brands fared worse than their German rivals, with Citroen (PEUP.PA) registrations down 20.6 percent, Chevrolet dropping 17.7 percent and Peugeot down 23.4 percent.

The gainers were South Korean value brands such as Hyundai (005380.KS), which achieved a 0.7 percent increase, and Kia (000270.KS), which boosted sales by 1.6 percent. (…)

Fingers crossed The blow of the overall annual decline was softened by December’s sales figures, with registrations up 5.4 percent on the same month last year, in line with a trend seen in other European countries.

EARNINGS WATCH

 

The Morning Ledger: Rising Rates Buoy Pension Plans

Pension-funding levels surged last year and we could see more gains in 2014. Towers Watson estimates levels last year rose by 16 percentage points to an aggregate 93% for 418 Fortune 1000 companies. That’s still below the 106% reached in 2007, but companies could see triple digits this year if long-term interest rates continue to rise and the stock market remains strong, Alan Glickstein, senior retirement consultant for Towers Watson, tells CFOJ’s Vipal Monga. (…)

Towers Watson said that the discount rate rose to an estimated 4.8% in 2013 from 3.96% in 2012. Meanwhile, the S&P 500 index rose 26% last year, the biggest gain since 1997, which boosted the asset values of the pension funds and helped to further shrink the funding gap. Towers Watson said that pension-plan assets rose an estimated 9% in 2013 to $1.41 trillion, from $1.29 trillion at the end of 2012, while companies cut the amount they contributed to the plans last year by 23% to $48.8 billion.

Heard on the Street’s David Reilly says that the discount rate should keep rising in 2014, even if not briskly as last year. The U.S. economic recovery is gaining strength, and the Fed is tapering its bond purchases. Higher rates should chip away at pensions’ overall liabilities.  “Improvement on both the asset and liability fronts means many companies may be able to begin lowering their pension expense, supporting earnings,” Reilly writes.

Pointing up The report noted that the higher funding levels caused many companies to reduce the amounts they contributed to the plans last year to $48.8 billion. That was 23% less than in 2012.

For example, Ford Motor Co. said in December that the improved environment could help the automaker halve its expected pension contributions to an average annual range between $1 billion to $2 billion over the next three years. That’s down from an earlier outlook of $2 billion to $3 billion.

SENTIMENT WATCH

We are seeing more and more of these thesis “explaining” that markets are expensive but they can carry on. For almost 5 years, most of the “bull” was produced by the bears. Funny how things just never change Crying face. This FT piece tells us all the “uneasy truths”. Well, some of it is not really truth, which is perhaps what makes it uneasy. Sounds like capitulation is very near.

Running with the bulls
Uneasy truths about the US market rally

US stocks may be overpriced and profit margins at a high but even bears say the rally has room to run

(…) Why is there such belief in a long-lived bull market? First, bond yields remain historically low, with 10-year Treasury bills yielding barely 3 per cent. When yields are low it is justifiable to pay a higher multiple for stocks because cheaper credit makes it easier for companies to make profits. Paying more for stocks also seems more palatable when bond yields are low.

Further, there is no evidence that investors are growing overexcited, as they usually do towards the end of a bubble. The American Association of Individual Investors’ weekly poll of its members has long been a reliable contrarian indicator. When large numbers say they are bullish it is generally a good time to sell. When the majority are bearish (the record for this indicator came in the second week of March 2009 when despair was total and the current bull market began) it is a good time to buy. Today, 47 per cent consider themselves bulls and 25 per cent bears, numbers a long way from an extreme of optimism.

However, stocks are unquestionably overpriced. Robert Shiller’s cyclically adjusted price/earnings multiple (Cape), long regarded as a reliable indicator of long-term value, is now at a level at which the market peaked before bear markets several times in the past. However, it remains below the levels it reached during true “bubbles” such as the dotcom mania. The same is true of “Tobin’s q”, which compares share prices with the total replacement value of corporate assets.

Further, profit margins are at a historic high and over time have shown a strong tendency to revert to the historic mean. The combination of high valuations being put on profits benefiting from cyclically high margins suggests markets are overvalued.

Why, then, are brokers calling for rising prices in 2014 or even a melt-up?

First, markets have their own momentum. On all previous occasions when earnings multiples have expanded this far this quickly, research by Morgan Stanley’s Adam Parker shows that they have carried on expanding for at least another year. And while the extent of US stocks’ rise since March 2009 is impressive, the duration of this rally is not unusual. Typically, bull markets carry on for longer. Also, this market has low levels of volatility and has not had a correction in a while. The approaching end of a bull market is generally marked by corrections and rising volatility.

Another reason to believe the bull market could eventually become a bubble lies in the record amounts of cash resting in money market funds, even though these funds pay negligible interest. The bull run is unlikely to peak until some of this money has found its way into stocks.

Finally, and most importantly, there is the role of monetary policy. The Federal Reserve’s programme of “quantitative easing” , in which it has bought mortgage-backed and government bonds in an attempt to force up asset values and push down yields, has had a huge impact on market sentiment.

Although the Fed said in December it would start tapering off its monthly bond purchases, it also says interest rates will stay at virtually zero until well into 2015. The S&P hit a record after the taper announcement. (…)

How can a “melt-up” be averted? Mr Parker of Morgan Stanley suggests that a significant correction would require fear that earnings will come in well below current projections – so the season when companies announce their earnings for the full year, which starts late in January, could be important. But with the US economy exceeding recent forecasts for growth, a serious earnings disappointment seems unlikely without a catalyst from outside the US – such as a big slowdown in China or a renewed crisis in Europe.

Failing these things, it could be left to the Fed itself to do the job by raising rates or removing stimulus faster than the market had expected.

Chris Watling of Longview Economics in London says US equity valuations are undoubtedly “full” – but are no more expensive than when Alan Greenspan, then Fed chairman, tried to talk down the stock market by warning of “irrational exuberance” in December 1996. On that occasion the bull market carried on for three more years and turned into an epic bubble before finally going into reverse.

“They’ll become more expensive,” says Mr Watling. “It’s not until we see tight money that we talk about the end of this valuation uplift in the US.”

This last comment comes from a fellow working at Longview Economics…Winking smile

Ritholtz Chart: Why ‘Wildly Overvalued’ Stocks May Keep Rising

(…) somewhat overvalued U.S. equity prices can continue to rise if price/earning multiples keep expanding.

Further P/E inflation is what BCA (Bank Credit Analyst) is expecting. They point out “a clear link between equity multiples and the yield curve [with] a steeper yield curve indicative of better growth and very easy monetary policy. As such, it often coexists with expanding equity  multiples.”

If we are entering a rising rate environment, a steeper yield curve is a likely stay. BCA notes that “the long end of the curve will be held high by real economic growth and better profitability, while the short end of the curve will be suppressed by the Fed.”

image
 
High five Return of inflation is inevitable
Fund manager Michael Aronstein bets on the lessons of history

Markets are underestimating a coming rout in bond prices, and missing early signs of the return of inflation, according to the US mutual fund manager who has raised more money than any other in the past year. (…)

He and his team pore over price data from hundreds upon hundreds of commodities and manufactured goods, and he highlights proteins – shrimp, beef, chicken – and US lumber among the areas where price spikes are already developing. It is outwards from these pressure points, he says, that the world will finally move from asset price inflation to real consumer price rises.

And as that happens, bonds will tumble and investors will reassess the safety of emerging markets that till now have been fuelled by unprecedentedly cheap money. There are profits to be made buying the companies with pricing power and betting against those without, he says, and from concentrating investment in developed economies and staying cautious beyond.

Party smile Hey! Who invited this Aronstein guy to the party?

OIL AND SHALE OIL

TheTradersWire.com posted this from hedge fund manager Andy Hall earlier this week with the following intro:

Phibro’s (currently Astenback Capital Management) Andy Hall knows a thing or two about the oil market – and even if he doesn’t (and it was all luck), his views are sufficiently respected to influence the industrial groupthink. Which is why for anyone interested in where one of the foremost oil market movers sees oil supply over the next decade, here are his full thoughts from his latest letter to Astenback investors. Of particular note: Hall’s warning to all the shale oil optimists: “According to the DOE data, for Bakken and Eagle Ford the legacy well decline rate has been running at either side of 6.5 per cent per month… Production from new wells has been running at about 90,000 bpd per month per field meaning net growth in production is 25,000 bpd per month. It will become smaller as output grows and that’s why ceteris paribus growth in output for both fields will continue to slow over the coming years. When all the easily drillable sites are exhausted – at the latest sometime shortly after 2020 – production from these two fields will decline.”

Here’s Hall’s very interesting note but FYI, Reuters’ had this piece on Dec. 6: Andy Hall’s fund losses deepen after wrong bet on U.S.-Brent crude

From Astenback Capital Management

The speed with which an interim agreement was reached with Iran was unexpected. Equally unexpected was the immediate relaxation of sanctions relating to access to banking and insurance coverage. This will potentially result in an increase in Iranian exports of perhaps 400,000 bpd. Beyond that it is hard to predict what might happen. The next set of negotiations will certainly be much more difficult. The fundamental differences of view that were papered over in the recent talks need to be fully resolved and that will be extremely difficult to do. Also, Iran’s physical capacity to export much more additional oil is in doubt because its aging oil fields have been starved of investment.

As to Libya, it seems unlikely that things will get better there anytime soon. The unrest and political discontent seems to be worsening. Whilst some oil exports are likely to resume – particularly from the western part of the country (Tripolitania), overall levels of oil exports from Libya in 2014 will be well below those of 2013.

Iraqi exports should rise by about 300,000 bpd in 2014 as new export facilities come into operation. But there is a meaningful risk of interruptions due to the sectarian strife in Iraq that increasingly borders on civil war. Saudi Arabia’s displeasure at the West’s quasi rapprochement with Iran is likely to add fuel to the fire in the Sunni-Shia fight for supremacy throughout the region.

If gains in 2014 of exports from Iran are assumed to offset losses from Libya, potential net additional exports from OPEC would amount to whatever increment materializes from Iraq. Saudi Arabia has been pumping oil at close to its practical (if not hypothetical) maximum capacity of 10.5 million bpd for much of 2013. It could therefore easily accommodate any additional output from Iraq in order to maintain a Brent price of $ 100 – assuming it wants to do so and that it becomes necessary to do so. Still, $ 100 is meaningfully lower than $ 110+ which is where the benchmark grade has on average been trading for the past three years.

So much for OPEC, what about non-OPEC supply? Most forecasters predict this to grow by about 1.4 million bpd with the largest contribution – about 1.1 million bpd – coming from the U.S. and Canada and the balance primarily from Brazil and Kazakhstan. Brazil’s oil production has been forecast to grow every year for the past four or five years and each time it has disappointed. Indeed Petrobras has struggled to prevent output declining. Perhaps 2014 is the year they finally turn things around but also, perhaps not. The Kashagan field in Kazakhstan briefly came on stream last September – almost a decade behind schedule. It was shut down again almost immediately because of technical problems. The assumption is that the consortium of companies operating the field will finally achieve full production in 2014.

Canada’s contribution to supply growth is perhaps the most predictable as it comes from additions to tar sands capacity whose technology is tried and tested. Provided planned production additions come on stream according to schedule in 2014, these should amount to about 200,000 bpd.

Most forecasters expect the U.S. to add 900,000 bpd to oil supplies in 2014, largely driven by the continuing boom in shale oil. That would be lower than the increment seen this year or in 2012 but market sentiment seems to be discounting a surprise to the upside. As mentioned above, many companies have been creating a stir with talk of exciting new prospects beyond Bakken and Eagle Ford which so far have accounted for nearly all the growth in shale oil production. Indeed at first blush there seem to be so many potential prospects it is hard to keep track of them all. Even within the Bakken and Eagle Ford, talk of down-spacing, faster well completions through pad drilling and “super wells” with very high initial rates of production resulting from the use of new completion techniques have created an impression of a cornucopia of unending growth and that impression weighs on forward WTI prices.

But part of what is going on here is the industry’s desire to maintain a level of buzz consistent with rising equity valuations and capital inflows to the sector.

The hot play now is one of the oldest in America; the Permian basin. A handful of companies with large acreage in the region are making very optimistic assessments of their prospects there. These are based on making long term projections based on a few months’ production data from a handful of wells. We wonder whether data gets cherry picked for investor presentations. We hear about the great wells but not about the disappointing ones. Furthermore, many companies are pointing to higher initial rates of production without taking into account the higher depletion rates which go hand in hand with these higher start-up rates. EOG, the biggest and the best of the shale oil players recently asserted that the Permian – a play in which it is actively investing – will be much more difficult to develop than were either the Bakken or Eagle Ford. EOG figures horizontal oil wells in the Permian have productivity little more than a third of those in Eagle Ford. EOG has further stated on various occasions that the rapid growth in shale oil production is already behind us.

In part this is simple math. The DOE recently started publishing short term production forecasts for each of the major shale plays. They project monthly production increments based on rig counts and observed rig productivity (new wells per rig per month multiplied by production per rig) and subtracting from it the decline in production from legacy wells. According to the DOE data, for Bakken and Eagle Ford the legacy well decline rate has been running at either side of 6.5 per cent per month. When these fields were each producing 500,000 bpd that legacy decline therefore amounted to 33,000 bpd per month per field. With both fields now producing 1 million bpd the legacy decline is 65,000 bpd per month. Production from new wells has been running at about 90,000 bpd per month per field meaning net growth in production is 25,000 bpd per month. It will become smaller as output grows and that’s why ceteris paribus growth in output for both fields will continue to slow over the coming years. When all the easily drillable sites are exhausted – at the latest sometime shortly after 2020 – production from these two fields will decline.

Others have made the same analysis. A couple of weeks ago the IEA expressed concern that shale oil euphoria was discouraging investment in longer term projects elsewhere in the world that will be needed to sustain supply when U.S. shale oil production starts to decline.

Decelerating shale oil production growth is also reflected in the forecasts of independent analysts ITG. They have undertaken the most thorough analysis of U.S. shale plays and use a rigorous and granular approach in forecasting future shale and non-shale oil production in the U.S. Of course their forecast like any other is dependent on the underlying assumptions. But ITG can hardly be branded shale oil skeptics – to the contrary. Yet their forecast for U.S. production growth also calls for a dramatic slowing in the rate of growth. Their most recent forecast is for U.S. production excluding Alaska to grow by about 700,000 bpd in 2014. With Alaskan production continuing to decline, that implies growth of under 700,000 bpd in overall U.S. oil production, or 200,000 bpd less than consensus.

The final element of supply is represented by the change in inventory levels. The major OECD countries will end 2013 with oil inventories some 100 million barrels lower than they were at the beginning of the year. That stock drawdown is equivalent to nearly 300,000 bpd of supply that will not be available in 2014. Data outside the OECD countries is notoriously sparse but the evidence strongly suggests there was also massive destocking in China during 2013.

U.S. Warns on Bakken Shale Oil

The federal government issued a rare safety alert on Thursday, warning that crude oil from the Bakken Shale in North Dakota may be more flammable than other types of crude.

The warning comes after two federal agencies spent months inspecting Bakken crude, including oil carried in recent train accidents that resulted in explosions. The latest blast occurred earlier this week in Casselton, N.D., 25 miles west of Fargo. (…)

North Dakota statistics shows about three-quarters of Bakken crude produced in the state is shipped out by rail.

Manhattan apartment sales hit record high
Figures boosted as overseas buyers compete with New Yorkers

(…) The number of purchases rose 27 per cent compared with the same period the year before to 3,297, according to new data released on Friday. Although down from 3,837 in the third quarter, this was the highest fourth-quarter tally since records began 25 years ago, according to appraiser Miller Samuel and brokerage Douglas Elliman Real Estate.

Limited supply has led to buyers often making immediate all-cash offers, participating in bidding wars and making decisions based on floor plans alone, in an echo of the previous property boom. The number of days a property was on the market in the fourth quarter almost halved from the previous year to 95 days.

“Demand from foreign buyers has never been stronger. Those from the Middle East, Russia, South America, China have been on an incredible buying spree and it is these sales that are driving prices,” said Pamela Liebman, chief executive of property broker The Corcoran Group.

The median price of a luxury apartment – usually above $3m – jumped 10 per cent from a year ago to $4.9m. (…)

The pool of homes for sale is shrinking as many owners wait for prices to rise further before they list. The number of homes on the market at the end of December fell 12.3 per cent from a year earlier to 4,164, near all-time lows.

And new supply is limited – developers hit by the financial crisis have only recently revived projects, which are often luxury residences sought by deep-pocketed local and foreign buyers.

The overall median sales price in the fourth quarter rose 2.1 per cent from the previous year to $855,000. The increase was led by condominiums – largely accounting for the new developments that are the preferred choice of international buyers – which had a record median price of $1.3m.

MILLENNIALS SHUN CREDIT

(…) the 80 million Americans between the ages of 18 and 30 spend around $600 billion annually, but the proportion of that cohort that doesn’t even own a credit card rose from 9 percent in 2005 to 16 percent in 2012. According to credit-reporting firm Experian, Millennials own an average of 1.6 credit cards, while the 30- to 46-year-olds of Generation X own 2.1, and Baby Boomers 2.7. And they don’t even overload those cards they do carry: the average card balance for 19- to 29-year-olds is $2,682, around half that of older age groups. (…)

Most consumers dialed back on credit during the recession. But consumer credit has been rebounding since—except among Millennials. Student loans are one reason for that divergence. In the past 20 years, the cost of tuition and room and board at both private and public colleges has skyrocketed (60 percent and 83 percent, respectively) to $40,917 and $18,391, according to the College Board.  Outstanding student loan balances were more than $1 trillion in September—up 327 percent in just a single decade–according to the New York Federal Reserve Board. The result: Education loans now account for the second largest chunk of outstanding consumer debt after mortgages. Students who graduated from private colleges in 2012 carried $29,900 in debt, up 24 percent in ten years, and public school graduates weren’t far behind, with $25,000 (up 22 percent). With that kind of luggage to carry around, it’s understandable that young people aren’t crazy about adding to their burdens.

There’s also the fact that it’s simply more difficult for young people to get credit cards than it used to be.  (…) (Credit Suisse)

 

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