NEW$ & VIEW$ (15 JANUARY 2014)

Consumers Spent Solidly in December

Just kidding This is the WSJ’s headline today. Below is the reality:

U.S. Retail Sales Post Moderate Year-End Increase

Retail spending increased 0.2% (4.1% y/y) during December after a 0.4% November gain, revised down from 0.7%. For all of last year retail sales increased 4.3%, the weakest increase of the economic recovery.

A 1.8% reduction (+5.9% y/y) in sales of motor vehicles & parts held back the increase in overall December sales. Nonauto retail sales rose 0.7% (3.7% y/y) after a 0.1% November uptick. Nonauto sales rose 3.4% during all of 2013, also the weakest gain of the recovery.

Higher sales of food & beverages led last month’s sales with a 2.0% gain (4.2% y/y) following two months of slippage. Clothing & accessory sales increased 1.8% (5.2% y/y) after a 0.5% November dip and gasoline service station sales rose 1.6% (0.6% y/y), after two months of decline. Sales of nonstore retailers showed continued strength with a 1.4% jump (9.9% y/y) following a 1.6% November gain. Furniture store sales dropped 0.4% (+4.5% y/y) after a 0.2% decline and building materials & garden equipment store sales slipped 0.4% (+2.1% y/y), down for the third month in the last five.

Not easy to get a clear measure of retail sales given the calendar quirks and bad weather. It is best to look at average sales growth for November and December.

  • Total retail sales: +0.3% (Nov.-Dec. avg) vs +0.5% in October.
  • Autos and Parts:  +0.1% vs +1.0%.
  • Non Autos ex Gas and Building Supplies: +0.5% vs +0.6%

Surprised smile Total sales for the October through December 2013 period were up 1.0% YoY.

Note that these figures are subject to big revisions. November’s surprising 0.7% original gain was revised down to 0.4%.

Pointing up U.S. Business Inventories Increase Slows

Total business inventories increased 0.4% in November (4.0% y/y), the slowest increase in three months. This inventory rise accompanied a 0.8% jump (4.0% y/y) in business sales after October’s 0.5% increase. As a result, the inventory-to-sales ratio remained at 1.29, where it’s been since April.

Pointing up In the retail sector, inventories advanced 0.8% (7.3% y/y) in November, including a 1.3% jump (13.7% y/y) in motor vehicles. Inventories excluding autos rose 0.6% (4.4% y/y).

Sad smile Taking the 3 months to November, retail inventories rose 2.9% sequentially while sales advanced only 0.7%. Ex-Autos: +1.3% vs +0.5%.

As I have been warning, there is clearly an inventory problem entering Q114. If you don’t believe me, read this:

Auto AutoNation CEO Calls U.S. Vehicle Inventories Too High

AutoNation Chief Executive Mike Jackson says new-car supplies in the U.S. are rising rapidly, putting pressure on auto companies as they try to avoid a profit-sapping price war.

(…) U.S. dealers have about $100 billion worth of unsold cars and trucks sitting on their lots, Mr. Jackson said. That level is striking given that car makers have pledged not to overstock dealers the way they did in the run-up to the financial crisis and the auto-sales collapse of 2008-2009, Mr. Jackson said. Auto makers book revenue when a car is shipped, not when it is sold at the dealership.

At the end of 2013, auto dealers had 3.45 million cars and trucks in stock, enough to last 63 days at the current selling rate, according to research firm Autodata Corp. A 60-day supply of cars is typically considered as healthy by the industry.

High five But Mr. Jackson said the inventory levels are much higher than that—closer to 90 to 120 days of supply—if cars sold to fleets are excluded from the selling rate. (…)

AutoNation’s Mr. Jackson said discounts are starting to rise across the industry already, even if they aren’t as obvious to consumers.

Among them are “stair-step programs” where car companies give money directly to dealers in exchange for hitting monthly sales targets.

“What worries me is if the industry was as disciplined as it says it is we would have stopped before 3.5 million” vehicles at dealerships, Mr. Jackson said. He sees about a 50-50 chance the industry will resort to an all-out discount war.

“What I’m saying is you’re on the edge of a slippery slope and even sliding down it a bit,” he said. “It’s a risk.”

Auto Makers Dare to Boost Output

A string of new factories in the region will start cranking out a million or more cars over the next several years.

A large increase in production capacity poses a serious risk for auto makers. They reap strong profits if their factories are running near 100% of capacity, but their losses mount rapidly if the utilization rate falls below 80%. (…)

Some auto makers are already concerned about overcapacity.

“The last thing we need is to get bricks-and-mortar capacity increased,” Sergio Marchionne, chief executive of Chrysler Group LLC and Fiat SpA, said this week. Building new plants isn’t the only trend to watch, he added, because increasing the use of automated production lines can boost output at existing factories. (…)

Magna warns 2014 sales likely below analysts’ estimates

Canadian auto-parts giant Magna International Inc. is forecasting 2014 sales that are below analysts’ estimates.

Aurora, Ont.-based Magna said on Wednesday in its financial outlook that it anticipates total sales of between $33.8-billion (U.S.) and $35.5-billion in 2014, lower than the consensus analysts’ estimate of $35.8-billion.

Jobs Deal Collapses in Senate

(…) After more than a week of talks, lawmakers failed to reach agreement to revive benefits for the roughly 1.4 million people who have lost aid since last month. Senate Democrats rejected the latest proposal from a group of eight Republicans, while GOP lawmakers dismissed an overture from Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D., Nev.) to allow votes on a handful of Republican amendments.

The law that expired in December dates from the financial crisis and provided federal aid to supplement the 26 weeks of unemployment benefits provided by most states, giving up to 47 weeks of additional payments. The latest proposals from both Democrats and Republicans would scale that back to a maximum of 31 weeks. (…)

Several lawmakers said they hope to continue negotiations, but the Senate isn’t expected to return to the issue until late January after next week’s congressional recess. The Senate is shifting its focus on Wednesday to consider the short-term stopgap spending bill to prevent a partial government shutdown and the $1.012 trillion bill to fund the federal government through Sept. 30, the end of the current fiscal year. (…)

HOUSING WATCH

From Raymond James:

  • California’s November existing single-family home sales fell 3.4%, on a seasonally-adjusted basis relative to October as rising home prices and higher mortgage rates reduced affordability. Closed sales stood at the lowest level since July 2010, falling to an annual run rate of 387,520 units (down 12.0% y/y). We note on a sequential basis, sales fell for the fourth consecutive month in November and have now declined on a year-over-year basis in ten of the last eleven months. California’s non-seasonally-adjusted pending home sales index (PHSI) fell 9.4% y/y (versus -10.4% y/y in October), and declined 13.6% m/m as Golden State buyers’ sensitivity to interest rate swings becomes increasingly apparent.
  • Florida existing home sales fell 1.2% y/y in November, the first negative y/y comp since March 2012 and down from a +6.5% y/y comp in October. Sequentially, sales decreased 11.3% from October, fueled by the combined increase in prices and mortgage rates outpacing household income growth. According to November data from RealtyTrac, 62.7% of Florida homes sold were all-cash transactions, the highest level of any state and well ahead of the next closest state (Georgia, 51.3%).

German GDP Disappoints

German economic growth failed to gain momentum in the fourth quarter of 2013, but economists predict stronger growth this year

Germany’s gross domestic product expanded 0.4% in 2013, following growth of 0.7% in 2012, the Federal Statistics Office said on Wednesday. The economy grew 0.5% when taking account of the number of working days each year.

Based on the full-year figures, GDP increased around 0.25% in the three months through December—about the same rate as the third quarter—according to the statistics office, which is due to publish fourth-quarter national accounts in mid-February.

Productivity crisis haunts global economy
Report shows most countries failed to improve overall efficiency

A productivity crisis is stalking the global economy with most countries failing last year to improve their overall efficiency for the first time in decades.

In a sign that innovation might be stalling in the face of weak demand, the Conference Board, a think-tank, said a “dramatic” result of the 2013 figures was a decline in the world’s ability to turn labour and capital resources into goods and services.

Productivity growth is the most important ingredient for raising prosperity in rich and poor countries alike. If overall productivity growth disappears in the years ahead, it will dash hopes that rich countries can improve their population’s living standards and that emerging economies can catch up with the advanced world.

The Conference Board said: “This stalling appears to be the result of slowing demand in recent years, which caused a drop in productive use of resources that is possibly related to a combination of market rigidities and stagnating innovation.”

The failure of overall efficiency – known to economists as total factor productivity – to grow in 2013 results from slower economic growth in emerging economies alongside continued rapid increases in capital used and labour inputs. Labour productivity growth also slowed for the third consecutive year.

The decline in total factor productivity continues a trend of recent years in which the remarkable rise in the efficiency of emerging markets has slowed and in advanced economies it has declined. (…)

The Conference Board’s annual analysis of productivity uses the latest data to estimate economic growth in all countries, the increase in hours worked and the deployment of additional capital to estimate the efficiency of individual economies.

Globally, it found that labour productivity growth declined from 1.8 per cent in 2012 to 1.7 per cent in 2013, having been as high as 3.9 per cent in 2010. Total factor productivity dipped 0.1 per cent.

For the US it found that productivity gains of the early years of the crisis continued to be elusive in 2013, with labour productivity growth stable at 0.9 per cent in 2013.

The US trends were, however, better than those in Europe, which has seen extremely weak productivity growth alongside relatively muted unemployment in most large economies with the exception of Spain, where joblessness soared. Labour productivity grew 0.4 per cent in 2013, having fallen 0.1 per cent in 2012.

Mr van Ark said Europe’s problem in achieving more efficiency from its labour force stemmed from structural rigidities.(…)

Emerging economies saw rates of growth of productivity fall from extraordinarily rapid rates, even though the rate of growth at 3.3 per cent was still much higher than in advanced economies.

For China, the Conference Board said that, while “the statistical information for the latest years is sketchy, the indications are that sustained investment growth in China has not been accompanied by the efficiency gains (measured by total factor productivity growth) similar to those of the previous decade”. (…)

World Bank warns of emerging market risk
Capital flows could fall 80% if central banks move too abruptly

An abrupt unwinding of central bank support for advanced world economies could cause capital flows to emerging markets to contract by as much as 80 per cent, inflicting significant economic damage and throwing some countries into crises, the World Bank has warned.

Capital flows into emerging markets are influenced more by global than domestic forces, leaving them vulnerable to disorderly changes in policy by the US Federal Reserve, concludes a study by World Bank economists.

SENTIMENT WATCH

 

The Year-Two Curse

In a world full of January barometers, Super Bowl indicators and sell-in-May-and-go mantras, Jeffrey Kleintop, chief market strategist at LPL Financial, thinks he’s found an indicator that actually works: the “year-two curse.”

“Year two” refers to the second year of a presidential cycle, which is what we’re in right now. Per the chart below, courtesy of LPL, the middle of the year tends to be fairly volatile for investors.

“The start of the second quarter to the end of the third quarter of year two has consistently marked the biggest peak-to-trough decline of any year of the four-year presidential term,” Mr. Kleintop wrote in a note to clients.Since 1960, nine of the 13 presidential terms have suffered from the dreaded curse, as the S&P 500 fell in the second and third quarters of those years, he says. (…)

Still, Mr. Kleintop maintains a relatively bullish stance about the rest of the year. “We may again see some seasonal weakness, but there is no need to fear the curse,” he says. “In fact, the curse may be a blessing for some, allowing those who have been awaiting a long-overdue pullback a chance to buy. It is important to keep in mind that history shows that, on average, year two posts a solid gain for stocks, and the year-two curse is reversed by the end of the year.”

 

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