NEW$ & VIEW$ (9 DECEMBER 2013)

GREEN FRIDAY

After pretty tame Black Friday and Thanksgiving sales, investors got their Green Friday with an ‘Unambiguously Positive’ Jobs Report accompanied by a relieving 1.1% jump in the S&P 500 Index, the best of all worlds for taper advocates. Good news is good news again!

The media narratives just flowed from that.

Employers Gain Confidence to Hire

U.S. employers are gaining confidence heading into year’s end, hiring at the quickest clip since before Washington’s political dysfunction rattled consumers and businesses this fall.

Payrolls rose by a seasonally adjusted 203,000 in November in sectors ranging from construction to health care, a striking pickup at an uncertain moment for the economy. Moreover, the jobless rate fell to 7% from 7.3%, though its declines in recent months have been driven in part by people leaving the labor force. (…)

U.S. job growth over the past three months now averages 193,000. In September, the average was thought to be 143,000; it has since been revised higher. (…)November’s job gains were more broad-based than in some previous months, suggesting fundamental economic improvements are reaching more parts of the economy.

Economists have worried that the biggest drivers of the nation’s job growth are lower-paying industries like retailers and restaurants. While those industries still represent a big chunk of the job gains, higher-paying sectors like manufacturing also grew in November, adding 27,000 jobs. (…)

It remains that

Nearly one-third of the private-sector job gains in November came from retailers, hotels, restaurants and temporary help agencies.

Retailers added 22,000 workers last month, while restaurants and hotels added 17,000 positions. Temporary help services hired another 16,000.

Lower-paying industries have dominated U.S. job growth for much of the recovery. Over the past year, retailers and temporary-help services have added 323,000 and 219,000 jobs, respectively.

By comparison, manufacturers added only 76,000 jobs.

As we all know, stats can be used to fit any viewpoint: the low month for job growth in 2013 was July at 89k.

  • First 6 months average employment change: +195k.
  • Last 5 months average employment change: +181k. Not enough to call it an ‘Unambiguously Positive’ jobs report. Tapering delayed.

But move July into the first part of the year:

  • First 7 months average employment change: +180k.
  • Last 4 months average employment change: +204k. Here comes the taper!

Never mind that the economy has added 2.3 million jobs over the past year, a pace that has changed little for the past two years in spite of QE1, 2,and 3.

Never mind that

Compared with September, the last reading before the shutdown, the new figures showed 265,000 fewer people working or looking for work, taking the labour market participation rate down from 63.2 per cent to 63 per cent of the adult population.

Declining participation was the main cause of the large fall in the unemployment rate, creating a puzzle and a worry for the Fed. If people are permanently dropping out of the labour force then it suggests there is less spare capacity in the economy.(FT)

Never mind that

Markit’s recent PMI surveys showed that the rate of growth was below that seen in September. Hiring slipped to the lowest for eight months as a result of firms reporting growing unease about the outlook. (Markit)

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And never mind the important inventory build up revealed by the Q3 GDP, recent car data and clear evidence of enormous surplus retail inventory post Thanksgiving, all suggesting that the recent manufacturing uptrend may be short lived. The U.S. economy, and for that matter Europe’s as well, have been propped up by a production push rather than by a more solid and durable consumer pull.

Real consumer expenditures rose 0.3% MoM in October after edging up 0.1% in September, in spite of a 0.2% advance in real disposable income during the last 2 months. Taking the 4-month period from July, real expenditures are growing at a 1.8% annualized rate, unchanged from the preceding 4-month period. During both periods, real disposable income has grown 2.7% annualized but real labour income growth halved from 1.8% annualized in March-June to 0.9% annualized in July-October.

Consumer demand sustained by government transfer income and a low savings rate is not solid foundation for economic growth, needless to say. It gets even more dangerous when corporate inventories accumulate rapidly, especially during the all important fourth quarter.

Taper or not? Taking liquidity out when things are so fragile would be a big mistake in my view. The Fed won its bet with QE-induced wealth boost for the top 10% but it would be ill-advised to take the punch bowl away before the ordinary people’s party begins.

Fed credibility has already been hurt by all the goofy rhetoric since last May. The only transparency they have achieved is to expose their flaws wide open. When you decide to be more transparent, you better make sure that what you have to show is attractive…otherwise, be a Greenspan and let markets guess for haven’s sake.

To be sure, as BCA Research is quoted in Barron’s (my emphasis),

(…) policy makers are hoping for a cyclical rebound in the participation rate as discouraged workers are drawn back into the labor market. There is no evidence that this is occurring so far.


As a result, BCA thinks the Fed will lower the threshold for forward guidance about increases in the federal-funds target (which has been pinned near 0% to 0.25% since late 2008) until the jobless rate falls to 5% or even 5.5%, instead of the current 6.5%, which could be reached by next October if current trends continue. The Fed’s notion is that the better job market will lure folks on the sideline to start looking for work again, slowing the decline in unemployment, even as more people find positions. But BCA says its clients are increasingly worried that there is less slack in the labor market than presumed and that the Fed is making an inflationary policy mistake.

Much like a rising equity market eventually lures investors into action.

In all what was said and written last Friday, this is what must be most reassuring to Ben Bernanke:

Jonas Prising, president of staffing company Manpower Group, said the official numbers fit with what is happening on the ground. “What we see is a continued improvement in employers’ outlook. Despite what you see and hear about uncertainty, employers are clearly seeing a gradually improving economy,” said Mr Prising, noting that the pick-up in hiring was slow but steady. (WSJ)

TAPER WATCH

This is from Fed’s mouthpiece John Hilsenrath:

Fed Closes In on Bond Exit

Fed officials are closer to winding down their $85 billion-a-month bond-purchase program, possibly as early as December, in the wake of Friday’s encouraging jobs report.

The Fed’s next policy meeting is Dec. 17-18 and a pullback, or tapering, is on the table, though some might want to wait until January or even later to see signs the recent strength in economic growth and hiring will be sustained. On Tuesday, officials go into a “blackout” period in which they stop speaking publicly and begin behind-the-scenes negotiations about what to do at the policy gathering. (…)

The sharp rise in stocks Friday shows that the Fed is having some success reassuring investors that it will maintain easy-money policies for years to come.

(…) the November employment report was the latest in a batch of recent indicators that have boosted their confidence that the economy and markets are in better position to stand with less support from large monthly central bank intervention in credit markets.

Pointing up The economic backdrop looks better now than it did in September. Fingers crossed

Payroll employment growth during the past three months has averaged 193,000 jobs per month, compared with 143,000 during the three months before the September meeting.

Moreover, in September, the White House and Congress were heading into a government shutdown and potential a debt ceiling crisis. Now they appear to be crafting a small government spending agreement for the coming year. The headwinds from federal tax increases and spending cuts this year could wane, possibly setting the stage for stronger economic growth next year.

Still, the jobs report wasn’t greeted as unambiguously good news inside the Fed. One problem was an undertone of distress among households even as the jobless rate falls.

The government’s survey of households showed that a meager 83,000 people became employed between September and November, while the number not in the labor force during that stretch rose by 664,000. The jobless rate fell from 7.2% to 7% during the period effectively because people stopped looking for jobs and removed themselves from the ranks of people counted as unemployed.

“The unemployment rate [drop] probably overstates the improvement in the economy,” Chicago Fed President Charles Evans told reporters Friday.

Another worry among officials, and another reason some officials might wait a bit before moving: Inflation, as measured by the Commerce Department’s personal consumption expenditure price index, was up just 0.7% from a year earlier, well below the Fed’s 2% target. Mr. Evans said he was troubled and puzzled by the very low inflation trend. (…)

Fed December Taper Odds Double in Survey as Jobs Beat Estimate

 

The share of economists predicting the Federal Reserve will reduce bond buying in December doubled after a government report showed back-to-back monthly payroll gains of 200,000 or more for the first time in almost a year. (…)

The payroll report puts the four-month average for gains at 204,000, and the six-month average at 180,000. Chicago Fed President Charles Evans, a supporter of record stimulus who votes on policy this year, said in April he wants gains of 200,000 a month for about six months before tapering. Atlanta’s Dennis Lockhart, who doesn’t vote, said several months of gains exceeding 180,000 would make slowing appropriate.

“The 200,000 number hits you right between the eyes,” said Chris Rupkey, chief financial economist at Bank of Tokyo-Mitsubishi UFJ Ltd. in New York. “That’s a number that everyone agrees the labor market is showing good-size gains, and the progress they’re making seems to be sustainable if that marker is met, which it was.”

See! It all boils down to where July stands in the economic calendar.

Credit-Card Debt Hits Three-Year High

U.S. consumers pushed their credit-card debt to a three-year high in October, a possible sign of their willingness to boost spending into the holiday season.

Revolving credit, which largely reflects money owed on credit cards, advanced by a seasonally adjusted $4.33 billion in October, the Federal Reserve said Friday. The expansion pushed total revolving debt to $856.82 billion, the highest level since September 2010.

The expansion marked a reversal from the prior four months when revolving balances either declined or held nearly flat. Consumers’ reluctance to add to credit-card balances was viewed by some economists as a sign of caution.

“Increasingly households are becoming more comfortable with using their plastic, and carrying a balance on it,” said Patrick J. O’Keefe, director of economic research at consulting firm CohnReznick. “The scars of 2007 and 2008 are starting to heal.”

When consumers are willing to carry a credit-card balance, it suggests they are confident they’ll have the future income needed to pay down the debt, he said.

The turnaround came in a month that brought a 16-day government shutdown, which weighed on consumer confidence and left hundreds of thousands of government workers without paychecks for weeks. (That may have been one factor in the increased use of credit cards. The federal workers received back pay after the shutdown.)

Total consumer credit, excluding home loans, rose by $18.19 billion in October, the largest gain since May. Economists surveyed by Dow Jones Newswires had forecast a $14.8 billion advance. (…)

The Fed report showed non-revolving debt, mostly auto and education loans, increased by $13.85 billion, or a 7.5% annualized jump. Such debt has been trending steadily higher since 2010, reflecting a surge in government-backed student loans and purchases of new autos. (…)

(ZeroHedge)

Fingers crossed  Congress Readies a Year-End Budget Dash

A Congress stymied by partisan divides, blown deadlines and intraparty squabbling gets a late chance to end the year with an elusive budget deal.

In the final week of 2013 that the Senate and House are scheduled to be in Washington at the same time, lawmakers and aides are optimistic that negotiators can reach a budget accord and continue to make progress on a farm bill and other measures.

China Exports Rise More Than Estimated

Overseas shipments rose 12.7 percent from a year earlier, the General Administration of Customs said today in Beijing. That exceeded estimates from 41 of 42 analysts surveyed by Bloomberg News. The trade surplus of $33.8 billion was the biggest since January 2009, while imports gained 5.3 percent, compared with a median projection of 7 percent.

The export figures reflect pickups in shipments to the U.S., Europe and South Korea, according to customs data.

China Inflation Stays Benign

 

The November consumer-price index was up 3% from a year ago, slowing down slight from October’s 3.2% pace, the statistics bureau said Monday. That was just below market expectations of a 3.1% rise and well within the government’s target of 3.5% inflation for the year.

Consumer inflation was even less of a worry when looked at on a month-over-month basis: It showed a decline of 0.1% in November, its first such drop since May.

At the factory level, producer prices continued to slide year-over-year, falling 1.4% for the 21st monthly decline in a row, showing continued weakness in domestic demand for raw materials. The decline in November was slightly less than the October’s 1.5%.

Japanese growth revised down
Third-quarter growth hit by weaker business activity

The updated calculation of gross domestic product in the three months to September showed that economic output increased at an annualised rate of 1.1 per cent, compared with an initial estimate of 1.9 per cent announced in November. (…)

The downward revision for the third quarter owed to lower estimates of investment and inventory-building by companies. Consumer spending was revised upward, but not enough to offset the less favourable view of business activity.

Corporate capital investment did not grow at all during the period, the data showed; the initial estimate had suggested a 0.7 per cent expansion. Inventory growth was cut to 0.7 per cent from double that figure in the initial data, while the estimate of private consumption growth was doubled to a still modest 0.8 per cent.

Bundesbank lifts German growth outlook
Central bank forecasts economic expansion of 1.7% in 2014

Germany’s Bundesbank has upgraded its economic projections, saying on Friday that strong demand from consumers would leave the euro area’s largest economy operating at full capacity over the next two years.

The Bundesbank has forecast growth of 1.7 per cent in 2014 and 1.8 per cent the following year. The unemployment rate, which at 5.2 per cent in October is already among the lowest in the currency bloc, is expected to fall further. (…)

The Bundesbank also expected inflation to fall back in 2014 – to 1.3 per cent from 1.6 per cent this year – before climbing to 1.5 per cent. If falls in energy prices were excluded, inflation would register 1.9 per cent next year.

EARNINGS, SENTIMENT WATCH

Notice the positive spin and the bee-sss just about everywhere now.

U.S. stocks could weather grim profit outlooks

The ratio of profit warnings to positive outlooks for the current quarter is shaping up to be the worst since at least 1996, based on Thomson Reuters data.

More warnings may jolt the market next week, but market watchers say this trend could be no more than analysts being too optimistic at the beginning and needing to adjust downward.

“There’s a natural tendency on the part of Wall Street in any given year to be overly optimistic as it relates to the back half of the year … It isn’t so much the companies’ failing, it’s where Wall Street has decided to place the bar,” said Matthew Kaufler, portfolio manager for Clover Value Fund at Federated Investors in Rochester, New York.

So any negative news about earnings may “already be in the stock prices,” he said. Sarcastic smile (…)

Still, estimates for fourth-quarter S&P 500 earnings have fallen sharply since the start of the year when analysts were building in much stronger profit gains for the second half of the year.

Earnings for the quarter are now expected to have increased 7.8 percent from a year ago compared with estimates of 17.6 percent at the start of the year and 10.9 percent at the start of the fourth quarter. (…)

The 11.4 to 1 negative-to-positive ratio of earnings forecasts sets the fourth quarter up as the most negative on record, based on Reuters data.

So far 120 companies have issued outlooks. In a typical quarter, between 130 and 150 S&P 500 companies issue guidance.

In small and mid-cap stocks, the trend appears much less gloomy.

Thomson Reuters data for S&P 400 companies shows 2.2 negative outlooks for every one positive forecast, while data for S&P 600 companies shows a similar ratio.

The S&P 500 technology sector so far leads in negative outlooks with 28, followed by consumer discretionary companies, with 22 warnings for the fourth quarter. (…)

“It appears while the percentage (of warnings) is high, it’s still not really infiltrating to all sectors,” said Peter Cardillo, chief market economist at Rockwell Global Capital in New York. “Obviously it impacts the individual (stocks), but maybe not the market trend.” (…)

So, this is a stock market, not a market of stocks!

Punch  That said, here’s a surprise for you: analysts estimates have actually gone up in the past 10 days:

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CAPITULATION
 
Hugh HendryA bear capitulates
Hugh Hendry on why equities will rise further

Hugh Hendry is CIO of Eclectica Asset Management

(…) In this environment the actual price of an asset no longer has anything to do with our qualitative perception of reality: valuations are out, liquidity in. In the wacky world created by such monetary fidgeting there is one reason for being long markets and one alone: sovereign nations are printing money and prices are trending. That is it. (…)

So here is how I understand things. You should buy equities if you believe many European banks and their sovereign paymasters are insolvent. You should be long risk assets if you believe China will have lowered its growth rate from 7 per cent to nearer 5 per cent over the course of the next two years. You should be long US equities if you are worried about the failure of Washington to address its fiscal deficits. And you should buy Japanese assets if you fear that Abenomics will fail to restore the fortunes of Japan.

It will all end badly; the mouse will die of course but in the meantime the stock markets look to us much as they did in 1928 or in 1998. In economic terms, America and Europe will remain resilient without booming. But with monetary policy set much too loose it is inevitable we will continue to witness mini-economic cycles that convince investors that economies are escaping stall speed and that policy rates are likely to rise. This happened in May.

The Fed, convinced its QE programme had succeeded in re-distributing global GDP away from China, began signalling its intent to taper. However, the anticipated vigorous American growth never materialised. The Fed had to shock market expectations by removing the immediacy of its tighter policy and stock markets rebounded higher.

So the spectre of tapering will probably continue to haunt markets but stronger growth in one part of the world on the back of easier policy will be countered by even looser policy elsewhere. Market expectations of tighter policy will keep being rescinded and markets, for now, will probably just keep trending.

Lance Roberts today (with a lot more from Hugh Hendry if you care):

(…) The PRIMARY ISSUE here is that there is NO valuation argument
that currently supports asset prices at current levels.

It is simply the function of momentum within the prevailing trend that makes the case for higher prices from here.

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Hmmm…The trend is your friend, hey? With friends like that…

THE U.S. ENERGY GAME CHANGER

I wrote about that in 2012 (Facts & Trends: The U.S. Energy Game Changer). It is now happening big time.

Shale gas boom helps US chemicals exports
America now second cheapest location for chemicals plants

The US chemicals industry is planning a sharp increase in its exports as a result of the cost advantage created by the shale gas boom, putting pressure on higher-cost competitors in Europe and Asia.

The American Chemistry Council, the industry association, predicts in forecasts published this week that US chemicals exports will rise 45 per cent over the next five years, as a result of a wave of investment in new capacity that will be aiming at overseas markets. (…)

The shale revolution has caused a boom in US production of natural gas liquids used as chemical feedstocks such as ethane, and sent their prices tumbling.

US producers also face electricity costs about half their levels in Europe, and natural gas just one-third as high.

The result has been a dramatic reversal from the mid-2000s, when the US was one of the world’s most expensive locations for manufacturing chemicals, to today when it is the second cheapest, bettered only by projects in the Middle East that have tied up feedstock on favourable terms.

International chemicals companies have announced 136 planned or possible investments in the US worth about $91bn, according to the ACC, with half of those projects proposed by non-US companies. (…)

“The US has become the most attractive place in the world to invest in chemical manufacturing.”

DEMOGRAPHICS

We can discuss political and financial philosophies, fiscal policies and monetary policies till the cows come home. But there is one thing that is mighty difficult to argue about: demographics. As Harry Dent says in this interview with John Mauldin, you have to go back 250 years to find a generation with as much impact as the current supersized baby boomer generation. The impact of retiring baby boomers is so powerful that it can totally offset fiscal and monetary policies without anyone noticing. The 20 minutes interview is not as good as I was hoping it might be but still deserves your time.

A team of Kansas City Fed economists just wrote about The Impact of an Aging U.S. Population on State Tax Revenues (http://goo.gl/u5g3j5) with this chart that summarizes the stealth trends underway:

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Here’s another way to deal with an adverse job market:

Saudi deportations gain momentum
Riyadh to expel up to 2m workers

Riyadh has said it wants to forcibly expel as many as 2m of the foreign workers, including hundreds of thousands of Ethiopians, Somalis, Indians, Pakistanis and Bangladeshis, who make up around a third of the country’s 30m population.

At home, the exodus of illegal workers is being seen as the kingdom’s most radical labour market experiment yet. With one in four young Saudi males out of work, analysts applaud Riyadh’s determination to tackle the problem, but doubt the crackdown will achieve its objective, as Saudi nationals are unlikely to apply for menial jobs. (…)

Ethiopia, Yemen, Somalia and several other countries are struggling to absorb the thousands of unemployed young men now returning, with development officials worrying about the impact on remittances.

Saudi Arabia is the world’s second biggest source of remittances, only behind the US, with outflows of nearly $28bn last year, according to estimates by the World Bank. (…)  Saudi analysts expect the crackdown on illegal workers to reduce remittance flows by nearly a quarter next year, or about $7bn. (…)

The crackdown on African and Asian illegal migrants is meant to complement a government labour market reform known as nitaqat, Arabic for “ranges”. Replacing the failing fixed-quota “Saudisation” system of 1994, nitaqat places a sliding scale of financial penalties and incentives on employers who fail to hire enough Saudi nationals. By draining the pool of cheap expatriate labour, the Saudi government hopes to encourage private sector employers to hire more nationals.

“The nationalisation agenda has been around for 20 years, but what’s changed is that the Arab spring has made private sector jobs for nationals a political priority,” says Steffen Hertog of the London School of Economics. “Saudi Arabia has become a laboratory for labour market reform,” he says. (…)

BUY LOW, SELL HIGH

A 700- year chart to prove a point:

Global Financial Data has put together an index of Government Bond yields that uses bonds from each of these centers of economic power over time to trace the course of interest rates over the past seven centuries.  From 1285 to 1600, Italian bonds are used.   Data are available for the Prestiti of Venice from 1285 to 1303 and from 1408 to 1500 while data from 1304 to 1407 use the Consolidated Bonds of Genoa and the Juros of Italy from 1520 to 1598.

General Government Bonds from the Netherlands are used from 1606 to 1699.   Yields from Britain are used from 1700 to 1914, using yields on Million Bank stock (which invested in government securities) from 1700 to 1728 and British Consols from 1729 to 1918.  From 1919 to date, the yield on US 10-year bond is used.

Ralph Dillon of Global Financial Data

 

2 thoughts on “NEW$ & VIEW$ (9 DECEMBER 2013)

    • Many make such claims and I tend to ignore them since, (1) I doubt it and (2) I have no way to verify. I try to compare BLS trends with other aggregators’ stats and see what the overall trend is.

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