NEW$ & VIEW$ (26 DECEMBER 2013)

Signs Point to Stronger Economy

A pickup in business investment and robust new-home sales point to an economy on stronger footing as the year winds to a close.

(…) Orders for U.S. durable goods rose 3.5% last month, reversing a decline in October, the Commerce Department said Tuesday. Excluding the volatile transportation category, manufactured-goods orders rose 1.2%, the strongest gain since May.

Meanwhile, Americans continued to purchase new homes at a brisk pace in November, the Commerce Department said in a separate report this week, the latest sign the housing market is regaining traction after a rise in mortgage rates. New-home sales hit a seasonally adjusted annual rate of 464,000 last month, down only 2.1% from October’s upwardly revised annual rate of 474,000. October and November marked the two strongest months of new-home sales since mid-2008.

The pair of reports showed renewed optimism by businesses and prospective homeowners, two of the biggest drivers of the economy, and led Macroeconomic Advisers to raise its estimate for fourth-quarter growth. It now forecasts gross domestic product to expand at an annualized rate of 2.6% in the final three months of the year, up three-tenths of a percentage point from an earlier estimate.

The overall durable-goods increase was driven by business investment, particularly in civilian aircraft orders, which rose nearly 22%. But a broader measure of business spending on software and equipment rose at a solid pace in November after falling in recent months. Orders for nondefense capital goods, excluding aircraft, increased by 4.5%, its strongest pace since January. That could be a sign businesses stepped up spending after the partial government shutdown in October. (Chart and table from Haver Analytics)

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U.S. Consumer Spending Up 0.5% in November

Americans stepped up their spending in November, boding well for holiday sales and offering the latest sign the U.S. recovery is gaining momentum.

Personal consumption, reflecting what consumers spend on everything from televisions to health care, climbed 0.5% in November from a month earlier, the fastest pace since June, the Commerce Department said Monday. The gain was driven by a boost in spending on big-ticket items, more than half of which came from automobile and parts buying, and on services.

But tepid income growth could limit future gains. Personal income increased 0.2% in November after falling 0.1% in October. As a result, consumers dipped into their savings to maintain their spending. (…)

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The price index for personal consumption expenditures, the Federal Reserve’s preferred gauge for inflation, was flat in November from a month earlier, the second consecutive month prices went unchanged. From a year earlier, prices were up 0.9% in November, after being up 0.7% in October.

Core prices, which exclude volatile food and energy costs, rose 0.1% from October and 1.1% from a year prior.

Nerd smile What’s wrong with this chart?

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Personal income gained a disappointing 0.2% (2.3% y/y) after a minimal dip in October. Disposable personal income increased just 0.1% (1.5% y/y), held back by a 0.8% rise (9.0% y/y) in tax payments. Wages & salaries increased 0.4% but the 2.2% year-to-year increase was the weakest since mid-2010.

Real disposable income rose 0.3% during the last 3 months, a very weak 1.2% annualized rate that lead to a very low 0.6% YoY increase in November. Meanwhile, real expenditures rose 1.1%, a 4.5% annualized rate. November real spending was up 2.6% YoY. Americans just keep dissaving to sustain their living standard. For how long?

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Meanwhile, Christmas sales are fuzzy:

This chart plots weekly chain store sales which have been in a narrow +2.0-2.3% YoY gain channel since the spring. Weak!

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But Online Sales Jumped 37% During Weekend

(…) After mall-traffic tracker ShopperTrak on Monday reported a 3.1% decline in holiday in-store sales and a 21% plunge in store traffic in the crucial shopping week ended Sunday, additional data again suggest a much brighter picture online. Total online sales from Friday through Sunday surged 37% year-to-year, with mobile traffic representing two-fifths of all online traffic, according to IBM Digital Analytics. Consumers buying from their mobile devices sent mobile sales up 53%, accounting for 21.5% of all online sales, IBM said. (…)

Sad smile With what looks to be a disappointing holiday season, Retail Metrics’ Ken Perkins said Tuesday that fourth-quarter retail sales for the 120 chains it tracks is now expected to rise just an average of 1.9%, the weakest since third-quarter 2009. Profit growth is expected to be just 1.3%, also the weakest since third-quarter 2009, “when retailers were still clawing their way out of the Great Recession.”

Fourth-quarter same-store sales are expected to rise an unimpressive 1.1%.

“It has been a very disappointing holiday season to date for most of retail,” said Mr. Perkins.

Late Surge in Web Buying Blindsides UPS, Retailers A surge in online shopping this holiday season left stores breaking promises to deliver packages by Christmas, suggesting that retailers and shipping companies still haven’t fully figured out consumers’ buying patterns in the Internet era.

(…) E-commerce accounts for about 6% of overall U.S. retail sales, according to the Commerce Department. This holiday season, online purchases will be nearly 14% of sales, estimates the National Retail Federation.

During the last shopping weekend before Christmas, Web sales jumped 37% from the year before, according to IBM Digital Analytics. Market research firm Forrester Research expects online sales to increase 15% this holiday season amid slow mall traffic and weak sales at brick-and-mortar retailers.

Coming back to the slow income growth trends:

 

Mortgage Applications Drop to 13-Year Low

The average number of mortgage applications slipped 6.3% to a 13-year low on a seasonally adjusted basis as interest rates rose from the previous week, the Mortgage Bankers Association said.

Following last week’s 6.1% drop, applications for purchase mortgages were down another 3.5% w/w to the lowest level since February 2012. The purchase index is currently tracking down 11.5% y/y. (…)  Application activity remains below both the recently reported y/y growth in new home sales (+22% in October) and existing home sales (-1.2% in November), led by a declining mix of first-time buyers within both segments. Recent data also suggests mortgage credit availability has tightened slightly more. (…)

The average contract rate on 30-year fixed conforming mortgages increased 2 bp w/w to 4.64%, matching the highest level since September, and is now up 105 bp since bottoming during the week ended May 3. Overall mortgage rates are up 113 bp y/y, as the spread relative to the 10-year Treasury note has now expanded 1 bp y/y to 175 bp.

BTW, FYI:

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Calm returns to China’s money markets Central bank skips open market operations

China Expects 7.6% Growth in 2013 China’s economy will post growth of 7.6% for all of 2013, a top planning official said, indicating that the world’s second-largest economy will exceed Beijing’s 7.5% target but that it also lost momentum in the final months of the year.

(…) China’s economy posted year-over-year growth of 7.8% in the third quarter after expanding at 7.7% in the first quarter and 7.5% in the second quarter amid a still sluggish global economy. A “mini-stimulus” of government investment in rail and subway construction coupled with tax and other business incentives helped boost growth in the July-September period. (…)

Ninja I suspect the Chinese are spying on NTU which revealed the Q4 slowdown on Dec. 18.

Christmas spirit does little for Spain
Subdued domestic demand weighs on the economy

(…) Retail sales are still a quarter lower than they were before Spain slid into economic crisis more than five years ago, and some shop owners say they have seen little change in consumer behaviour so far. (…)

Until now, the recovery has been driven almost exclusively by rising exports, with domestic demand acting as a drag on growth. The surge in shipments to foreign markets was sufficiently strong to lift Spain out of recession in the third quarter this year, and has given companies the confidence to start investing in plants and machinery. But economists warn that Spain will be stuck with anaemic growth at best as long as domestic demand remains as subdued as it is now.

There are some signs of hope. According to the Bank of Spain, the decline in overall household consumption slowed in the third quarter. Spanish retail sales actually rose 2.1 per cent on an annual basis in September, the first such increase in more than three years, but fell back into negative territory the next month. Consumer confidence has risen sharply and car sales – helped by a government subsidy programme – are also up.

Javier Millán-Astray, director-general of Spain’s association of department stores and retail chains, notes that sales on the first big shopping weekend of the holiday season were up 8 per cent compared with last year, and predicts an overall rise in Christmas sales of 6-7 per cent compared with 2012. “We have seen a change in the trend since August. Sales have still been falling but the drops are much smaller than before. And the truth is that the first weekend of the Christmas season was much better than the year before.” (…)

 

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