NEW$ & VIEW$ (17 DECEMBER 2013)

Industrial Output Hits a Milestone

Industrial production, which measures the output of U.S. manufacturers, utilities and mines, surged a seasonally adjusted 1.1% from the prior month, the Federal Reserve said Monday. That was the biggest jump in a year.

The ascent in part reflects big gains for volatile mining and utilities components, though underlying figures point to steadily rising demand for an array of industrial goods.

Manufacturing, the largest component of industrial production, remains below its prerecession peak. But the sector expanded 0.6% in November, the fourth straight month of gains. Overall factory output is up 2.9% from a year earlier.

Rising auto output led the increase, with motor-vehicle assemblies at the highest level in eight years. (Chart from Haver Analytics)

Strong report overall, indicating a rising momentum in most sectors. Capacity utilization keeps rising, a positive for profit margins.

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Here’s the LT Cap. Ute. chart from CalculatedRisk:

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Meanwhile, other costs are rising faster (Charts from Haver Analytics):

But not in manufacturing:

Auto  European Car Sales Rise for Third Month of Increased Demand

European new-car sales rose a third consecutive month in November, the longest period of gains in four years, as demand for autos from Volkswagen AG and Renault SA contributed to signs that an industrywide decline is ending.

Registrations in November increased 0.9 percent from a year earlier to 975,281 vehicles, the Brussels-based European Automobile Manufacturers Association, or ACEA, said today in a statement. The growth followed gains of 4.6 percent in October and 5.5 percent in September.

Among Europe’s five biggest car markets, demand increased 15 percent last month in Spain, which ranks fifth in the region, and 7 percent in the U.K., which places second. The Spanish government revived a cash-for-clunkers incentive program in October to boost car sales. Registrations dropped in Germany, France and Italy.

Asian, German Car Makers Seen Boosting Capacity in North America

Asian auto makers are expected to add the capability to build nearly one million more vehicles in North America over the next six years, and German auto makers could boost capacity by 700,000 in a challenge to the market stability that has helped boost profits for Detroit’s three big auto makers.

The new plants are aimed at supplying a projected growth in demand in the North American market, and could be used to ramp up exports, particularly to Europe and the Middle East and Africa, according to a new report by IHS Automotive—a division of business information firm IHS Inc.

Mike Jackson, a production forecaster with IHS Automotive, said that despite the two-million-unit increase forecast, overcapacity shouldn’t be a serious concern.

“We still anticipate a 90% to 95% utilization rate,” he said.

Mr. Jackson estimates that by 2020, two million vehicles will be exported from North America, a 60% increase over today. By then, 35% of exports will be going to Europe, 25% to South America and 22% to the Middle East and Africa, which is forecast to have strong growth. (…)

Global Car Sales Seen Rising to 85 Million in 2014

The global auto industry is expected to produce 85 million sales in 2014, up from an estimated 82 million this year, IHS Automotive said in a forecast Monday.

By 2018 sales are forecast to break 100 million, according to the unit of business-information provider IHS Inc.

This global growth is driven by rising wealth in emerging markets as well as relatively moderate gasoline prices. (…)

The U.S. market may rise 2.4% to 16.03 million from 15.65 million this year and to peak in 2017 at nearly 17 million before leveling off. (…)

Production in North America also is forecast to rise by 2.1 million vehicles between now and 2020, driven by new plants in the U.S. and Mexico. Asian auto makers are expected to add more than one million units of that capacity.

In a separate report, Deutsche Bank estimates global automobile sales will rise 4% in 2014, to 87.4 million light vehicles. That would be slightly ahead of the 3.5% growth the industry is on track to hit for this year, when global auto sales are expected to total 84 million vehicles. Total auto sales estimates can vary because of inconsistencies in reporting by different countries and whether heavier duty vehicles are included in the total.

The key drivers will be a return to growth in Europe and continued strong demand in the U.S. and China.

After six years of declines in new-car sales, Europe should see a rise of 3% in 2014, to about 14 million light vehicles, according to Deutsche Bank’s forecast. While that total would be an improvement from 2013, it would still be well below the 18 million new cars and light commercial vehicles that were sold in 2007. The bank says an aging fleet of cars on European roads, and a shortage of used cars, will prod more buyers to showrooms next year. (…)

The U.S. should also get a lift as consumers who signed three-year leases on new cars in 2011 look to trade in for new vehicles. Leasing plunged between 2008 and 2010, and the rebound in leasing since them should provide a steady stream of ready customers for 2014, 2015 and 2016, Deutsche Bank wrote.

The Chinese market for cars should grow 10% next year, to 23.8 million cars and light trucks. That is still a robust rate but down from the 13% increase the market will see for 2013. For this year auto sales are seen reaching 21.7 million vehicles.

Euro-Zone Prices Fall

Despite the decline in euro-zone prices during November, the European Union’s statistics agency said the annual rate of inflation rose to 0.9% from 0.7%, in line with its preliminary estimate. But even after that pickup, the rate of inflation was well below the European Central Bank’s target of just below 2.0%, and slowing labor costs suggest a significant increase is unlikely in the months to come.

According to Eurostat’s figures, energy prices fell by 0.8% during November, and were down 1.1% from the same month of 2012. But services prices also fell during the month, while prices of manufactured goods and food rose slightly.

Pointing up In a separate release, Eurostat said total labor costs in the three months to September were 1.0% higher than in the same period of 2012, while wages were 1.3% higher. In both cases, the rate of increase was the smallest since the third quarter of 2010. (…)

Wages fell in Ireland, Portugal, Cyprus and Slovenia, and were flat in Spain. That indicates that some rebalancing of the euro zone’s economy is under way.

But that relabancing would be aided by a more rapid rise in wages in stronger economies such as Germany. While the rate of wage growth there was higher than in the euro zone as a whole, it slowed significantly from the second quarter, to 1.7% from 2.2%.

OIL

US oil production to test record high
Shale boom sends output soaring

(…) The EIA said on Monday that it had revised sharply higher its estimates of future US crude output to about 9.5m barrels a day in 2016. That is very close to the previous peak in US production of 9.6m b/d in 1970 and almost double its low point of 5m b/d in 2008. (…)

A year ago, the EIA was predicting US crude production of about 7.5m b/d in the second half of this decade, a level that has already been surpassed this year. It has now revised sharply higher its estimates of future output in its central “reference case”, which assumes that current laws and regulations remain generally unchanged. (…)

The EIA now predicts that US crude output will begin to tail off slowly after 2020, but says there is still great uncertainty over the outlook. Adam Sieminski, the administrator of the EIA, said factors influencing the outlook for production would include future discoveries about the geology of US shale oilfields, regulatory requirements imposed on producers and investment in new pipelines.

Sustaining the surge in US oil production will require prices that are high by the standards of a decade ago. Mr Sieminski said US shale production would be profitable at prices above $90 a barrel, and possible at above $80-$85 a barrel. (…)

For natural gas, meanwhile, the EIA is predicting continued indefinite growth in production. Gas is easier to produce than oil from shale and other “tight” rocks, and by 2040 the EIA expects US production to be 56 per cent higher than in 2012. (…)

Oil Supply Surge Brings Calls to Ease U.S. Export Ban

The U.S. is meeting 86 percent of its own energy needs, the most since 1986, Energy Department data show.

A surplus of crude could overwhelm Gulf Coast and Canadian refineries that weren’t built for the type of oil now in abundance from new fields in North Dakota and Texas, forcing the issue, McKenna said.

U.S. refineries invested more than $100 billion in the past two decades on upgrades to handle heavy crudes from Mexico, Venezuela and the Middle East, according to Michael Wojciechowski, a Houston-based refining analyst at Wood Mackenzie, an industry research and consulting company.

“We’re going to have two choices, really — export production or shut-in production,” McKenna said. “That’s an ugly choice.”

Or build new refineries.

Once refined, oil may be exported as fuels, which aren’t restricted. The U.S. became a net exporter of petroleum products in June 2011 and shipped a record 3.37 million barrels a day for three weeks in October, Energy Department data show.

Profit Growth Outpaces Dividends at S&P 500 Firms

(…) Members of the S&P 500 index paid out just 33% of their reported earnings per share in the form of dividends during the third quarter. That’s down from the quarterly average of almost 45% since 1988 and an average of nearly 52% since 1936, according to Howard Silverblatt, senior index analyst for S&P Dow Jones Indices. (…)

Companies also are expected to pay out about 33% of profit in the fourth quarter, Mr. Silverblatt says, as profit growth outpaces dividend increases. (…)

Airplane  Boeing boosts dividend and buybacks
Jet maker voices confidence as it returns cash to shareholders

Boeing intends to increase its dividend by 50 per cent and ask investors to approve up to $10bn of share buybacks, the commercial jet maker said on Monday, calling the move a mark of confidence in its own future.

The quarterly dividend would increase from 48.5 cents to 73 cents, Boeing said. The new $10bn buyback programme would allow repurchases to continue once the company has exhausted the remaining $800m of an outstanding buyback authorisation granted in 2007.

Easy Money Delays Retail Shakeout

Investors are eagerly lending to risky retail borrowers like RadioShack, Sears Holdings and J.C. Penney, buying the chains time to try to turn around their businesses but delaying the overbuilt industry’s day of reckoning.

Thumbs down Loehmann’s Files for Bankruptcy

The discount retailer files for bankruptcy Sunday under the weight of more than $100 million of debt. The company employs 1,600 people at some 39 stores.

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