NEW$ & VIEW$ (16 DECEMBER 2013)

U.S. Producer Prices Fall 0.1%

The producer-price index, which measures what firms pay for everything from lumber to light trucks, fell 0.1% from October, the Labor Department said Friday. That marked the third straight monthly decline, owing largely to a fall in gasoline costs from the summer. Excluding food and energy, “core” prices rose 0.1% in November after climbing 0.2% in October.

Compared with a year earlier, overall prices were up 0.7% in November, more than double the pace of the prior two months. Core prices climbed 1.3% in November from a year earlier after rising 1.4% year-over-year in October.

Half of U.S. Lives in Household Getting Benefits  The share of Americans living with someone receiving government benefits continued to rise well into the economic recovery, reflecting a weak labor market that pushed more families onto food stamps, Medicaid or other programs.

Nearly half of the U.S., or 49.2% of the population, live in a household that received government benefits in the fourth quarter of 2011, up from 45.3% three years earlier, the Census Bureau said.

Government benefits as defined by Census include Medicaid, Medicare, Social Security, food stamps, unemployment insurance, disability pay, workers’ compensation and other programs.

Part of the increase comes from an aging population, with the 16.4% of the population living in a household where someone gets Social Security and 15.1% where someone receives Medicare. That was up from 15.3% and 14%, respectively, at the end of 2008.

But the biggest increases were in benefits aimed at helping the poor. The program experiencing the sharpest rise in participation was food stamps, officially known as the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program. About 16% of people lived in a household where someone was receiving SNAP benefits, up from just 11.4% at the end of 2008.

Participation in Medicaid, the government health-insurance program for the poor and disabled, also climbed. At the end of 2011, 26.9% of the population was living in a household where at least one member was receiving Medicaid benefits, up from 23.7% three years earlier.

(…) unemployment compensation is one of the smaller pieces of the safety net. The Census report showed 1.7% of people lived in households where someone was collecting unemployment compensation in the final quarter of 2011 up a bit from 1.4% in 2008.

Canadian Housing: The Bubble Debate

It is always difficult to spot a speculative bubble in advance, but in the case of Canadian housing the weight of evidence is clear in our view: Canada Housing Bubble

  • Price level: The IMF highlighted recently that Canada tops the list of the most expensive homes in the world, based on the house-to-rent ratio.
  • Broad Based: Real home prices have surged in every major Canadian city since 2000, not just in Toronto and Vancouver.
  • Over-Investment: Residential investment has risen to 7% of GDP, above the peak in the U.S. and far outpacing population growth.
  • High Debt: Household debt now stands at nearly 100% of GDP, on par with the U.S. at the peak of its housing boom. The increase in household debt as a percent of GDP since 2006 has been faster in Canada than anywhere else in the world, according to the World Bank.
  • Excessive Consumption: The readiness of Canadian households to take on new debt by using their homes as collateral has fueled the consumption binge. Outstanding balances on home equity lines of credit amount to about 13% of GDP, eclipsing the U.S. where it peaked at 8% of GDP at the height of the bubble.

The IMF and the BoC have argued that the air can be let out of the market slowly. But, as the old cliché goes, bubbles seldom end with a whimper. What could spoil the party? Higher interest rates are a logical candidate for ending the housing boom.

EARNINGS WATCH 

This Thomson Reuters chart has been around a lot lately, generally on its own, being apparently self-explicit.

ER_1209

The chart deserves some explanations, however:

  • The reason the ratio is so high currently is not really because many more companies have decreased guidance but rather because very few have raised it.

Over the past four quarters (Q412 – Q313), 86 companies on average have issued negative EPS guidance and 26 companies on average have issued positive EPS guidance. Thus, the number of companies issuing negative EPS guidance for Q4 is up only 3% compared to the one-year average, while the number of companies issuing positive EPS guidance for Q4 is down 54% compared to the one-year average. (Factset)

  • The chart uses Thomson Reuters data which seems to be the most negative among aggregators. Factset data show a negative/positive ratio of 7.8x. The ratio has deteriorated from 7.4x the previous week, however, as 5 more companies have issued negative guidance against zero positive.

(…) a record-high 94 companies in the S&P 500 index already have done so for the current quarter. Conversely, a record-low 12 have said they would do better. That ratio of 7.83 negative-to-positive warnings dwarfs any quarter going back to 2006, when FactSet began tracking such data.

  • So far 120 companies have issued outlooks. In a typical quarter, between 130 and 150 S&P 500 companies issue guidance.
  • In small and mid-cap stocks, the trend appears much less gloomy. Thomson Reuters data for S&P 400 companies shows 2.2 negative outlooks for every one positive forecast, while data for S&P 600 companies shows a similar ratio.

The bulk of negative preannouncements is in IT and Consumer Discretionary sectors which have also recorded the largest increase in negative preannouncements in recent weeks.image

In spite of the above, earnings estimates are not cut. Q4 estimates (as per S&P) are now $28.41 ($28.45 last week) while 2014 estimates have been shaved $0.13 to $122.42, up 13.8% YoY. Actually, 2014 estimates have increased 0.4% since September 30.

THE CHRISTMAS RALLY

This is December over the past ten years (Ryan Detrick, Senior Technical Strategist, Shaeffer’s Investment Research)

Is Santa Coming This Year?

Wait, wait!

Bespoke Investment suggests the market is oversold:

(…) Below is a one-year trading range chart of the S&P 500.  The blue shading represents between one standard deviation above and below its 50-day moving average (white line).  The red zone is between one and two standard deviations above the 50-day, and moves into or above this area are considered overbought.  As shown, after trading in overbought territory since October, the S&P has finally pulled back into its “normal” trading range this week.  Technicians will be looking for the 50-day to act as support in the near term if the index trades down to it.  A break below means we’ll potentially see a close in oversold territory for the first time since June.  

While the S&P 500 is just above its 50-day in terms of price, its 10-day advance/decline line is indeed oversold.  The 10-day A/D line measures the average number of daily advancers minus decliners in the index over the last 10 trading days.  This provides a good reading on short-term breadth levels.  The oversold reading in place right now means the last ten days have not been kind to market bulls.  Over the last year, however, moves into the green zone have been good buying opportunities.

Gift with a bow  And here’s your Christmas present:

The Santa Claus Rally Season Is About To Begin (crossingwallstreet.com/)

I took all of the historical data for the Dow Jones from 1896 through 2010 and found that the streak from December 22nd to January 6th is the best time of the year for stocks. (December 21st and January 7th have also been positive days for the market but only by a tiny bit.)

Over the 16-day run from December 22nd to January 6th, the Dow has gained an average of 3.23%. That’s 41% of the Dow’s average annual gain of 7.87% occurring over less than 5% of the year. (It’s really even less than 5% since the market is always closed on December 25th and January 1st. The Santa Claus Stretch has made up just 3.8% of all trading days.)

Here’s a look at the Dow’s average performance in December and January (December 21st is based at 100):

You should note how small the vertical axis is. Ultimately, we’re not talking about a very large move.

May I remind you that you can get all the dope on monthly stock returns in the “MARKET SMARTS” section of my sidebar. Here are the two charts that matter:

This is the simplified chart from RBC Capital Markets

image

Here is Doug Short’s:

WANT MORE?

Buy The “December Triple Witching” Dip (BofAML via ZeroHedge),

This Friday is December Triple Witching (the term used for the quarterly expiry of US equity index futures, options on equity index futures and equity options). Consistently the week of December Triple Witching is one strongest of the year for the S&P500. In the 31 years since the creation of equity index futures, the S&P500 has risen 74% of the time during this week. More recently, it has risen in ten of the past 12 years. With equity volatility fast approaching a buy signal, the conditions are growing ripe for an end to the month long range trade and resumption of the larger bull trend (we target 1840/1850 into year-end).

 
SENTIMENT WATCH
 

General Electric to raise dividend 16%  Largest increase by US manufacturing group since 2010

Hunger Grows for U.S. Corporate Bonds

Investors are buying new U.S. corporate bonds at a record pace, and demanding the smallest interest-rate premium to comparable government bonds since 2007.

imageDemand has also put sales of new junk-rated corporate bonds in the U.S. on pace to surpass last year’s record. Sales of investment-grade bonds in the U.S. this year are already at the highest ever, according to data provider Dealogic. (…)

The narrowest reading for investment-grade corporate-bond spreads in recent years came in 2005, when the gap hit 0.75 percentage point. (…)

According to Moody’s Investors Service, the default rate for below-investment-grade companies in the U.S. was 2.4% in November, down from 3.1% a year earlier. (…)

Meanwhile:

U.S. Rate Rise Sends High-Dividend Stocks Lower

The Dow Jones U.S. Select Dividend Index has lagged behind the Standard & Poor’s 500 Total Return Index by 4.6 percentage points on a total-return basis since April 30. During the same period, the yield on 10-year U.S. Treasuries has risen to 2.88 percent from 1.67 percent. The dividend group fell to its lowest level in more than a year Dec. 11 relative to the broader gauge.

BARRON’S COVER

An Upbeat View of 2014 Wall Street strategists expect stocks to rise 10%, boosted by a stronger economy and fatter corporate profits. Bullish on tech, industrials.

THE 10 STRATEGISTS Barron’s consulted about the outlook for 2014 have year-end targets for the S&P of 1900 to 2100, well above Friday’s close of 1775.32; their mean prediction is 1977.

(…) the strategists expect earnings growth to do the heavy lifting, with S&P profits climbing 9%, compared with subpar gains of 5% in the past few years.

Specifically, the strategists eye S&P profits of $118, up from this year’s estimated $108 to $109. Industry analysts typically have higher forecasts; their 2014 consensus is $122, according to Yardeni Research.

The consensus view is that yields on 10-year Treasury bonds will climb to 3.4% next year from a current 2.8%. Our panel’s predictions on year-end yields for the 10-year bond range widely, from 2.9% to 3.75%.

(…) corporations are sitting on $1 trillion of cash, and there is pent-up demand for investment around the world. Thomas Lee, the chief U.S. equity strategist at JPMorgan Chase, notes that U.S. gross fixed investment has fallen to 13% of GDP, on par with Greece and well below the 16% to 21% range that obtained from 1950 to 2007. Just getting back to the midpoint of that range would require additional spending of $600 billion, he observes. (…)

The calendar, too, is a help. Addition will come from subtraction as the U.S. begins to lap some of the government’s automatic spending cuts tied to the sequestration that began last spring, and the expiration of the Obama administration’s 2% payroll-tax cut early this year. The government cost the economy perhaps 1.5 percentage points of GDP growth in 2013, but “government drag will be a lot less in 2014,” predicts Auth.

Both people and companies will start to spend more in 2014, he adds.

How to be right, whatever happens;

Time to Brace for a 20% Correction Ned Davis Research expects a 2014 buying opportunity. How to play the decline-and-recovery scenario.

Davis: Right now, about 78% of industry groups are in healthy uptrends. That would have to fall to about 60% for us to say the market had lost upside momentum. We also focus on the Federal Reserve, and it’s still in a very easy mode, despite all the talk about tapering. So, those two indicators are bullish. However, we’ve looked at all the bear markets since 1956 and found seven associated with an inverted yield curve [in which short-term interest rates are higher than long ones] — a classic sign of Fed tightening. Those declines lasted well over a year and took the market down 34%, on average. Several other bear markets took place without an inverted yield curve, and the average loss there was about 19% in 143 market days. We don’t see an inverted yield curve anytime soon. So, whatever correction we get next year is more likely to be in the 20% range.

We also looked at midterm-election years — the second year of a presidential term, like the one coming up in 2014 — going back to 1934, and the average decline in those years was 21%. But after the low was hit in those years, the market, on average, gained 60% over two years. So, a correction should be followed by a great buying opportunity. (…)

Hedge Funds Underperform The S&P For The 5th Year In A Row

The $2.5 trillion hedge-fund industry is headed for its worst annual performance relative to U.S. stocks since at least 2005. As Bloomberg Brief reports, the funds returned 7.1% in 2013 through November; that’s 22 percentage points less than the 29.1% return of the S&P 500, with reinvested dividends, as markets rallied to records. Hedge funds are underperforming the benchmark U.S. index for the fifth year in a row as the Fed’s inexorable liquidity pushes equity markets higher (and the only way to outperform is throw every risk model out the window). Hedge funds (in aggregate) have underperformed the S&P 500 by 97 percentage points since the end of 2008.

Light bulb  Hence the new marketing stance:

“We are seeing a shift in how investors view hedge funds,” said Amy Bensted, head of hedge funds at Preqin. “Pre-2008, investors thought of them – and hedge funds marketed themselves – as a source of additional returns.

“Now, they are not seen just being for humungous, 20 per cent-plus returns, but for smaller, stable returns over many years.” (FT)

Winking smile  NEXT JOB FOR BERNANKE  China’s Smog Forces Pilots to Train for Blind Landings

 

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