NEW$ & VIEW$ (13 DECEMBER 2013)

U.S. Retail Sales Rose 0.7%

Consumers spent more freely in November, buoying hopes that economic growth could accelerate in the months ahead.

Retail sales rose a seasonally adjusted 0.7% in November from October, marking the biggest gain since June, the Commerce Department said Thursday. The prior month’s gain was revised up to 0.6% from 0.4%. (…)

In addition to strong auto sales, the report also showed that consumers spent freely last month on furniture, electronics and building materials. Retail sales were up 4.7% from the same period last year, the largest annual gain since July.

The improvement prompted several forecasters to upgrade their predictions for economic growth in the final three months of the year. Economists at Barclays raised their estimate to a 2.2% annual rate from 2%, while J.P. Morgan Chase economists boosted their forecast to 2% from 1.5%. (…)

 

It Wasn’t Holiday Spending That Boosted Retail Sales

When you just look at categories where people buy gifts, such as electronics, clothing and department stores and even add in online retailers, and exclude car dealers, gas stations and restaurants, sales were up just 2.8% in November from a year earlier. That represents the weakest nonrecession November in at least 20 tears and compares to a 4.7% gain for total retail sales.

(…)  maybe it just means that more people decided to get their holiday shopping done in December. And if that holds true, it means December’s retail sales could be a blockbuster.

Sales of motor vehicles & parts led the increase with a 1.8% gain (10.2% y/y). Furniture & electronics/appliance store sales jumped 1.1% (8.2% y/y) following a 2.2% October surge.

Is The Consumer Slowing Down?

Written by Lance Roberts

(…) The problem with any single data point is that it obscures the trend of the data, as shown in the chart below, which is more telling of the overall strength or weakness of the consumer.  

The chart above is the 12-month average of non-seasonally adjusted retail sales data.  This eliminates all of the questionable gimmickry of the seasonal adjustments to reveal the underlying trend of actual retail sales data.  Surging asset prices have done little to boost retail sales which have stagnated in recent months just above the level which has normally been indicative of recessionary drags in the economy.  (…)

But that helps:image

U.S. Business Inventories Continue to Climb

Total business inventories increased 0.7% in October (3.6% y/y) following a 0.6% September gain. These inventories accompanied a 0.5% rise in business sales (3.9% y/y) after September’s 0.3% increase. As a result, the inventory-to-sales ratio remained at 1.29, where it’s been since April.

In the retail sector, inventories advanced 0.8% (6.1% y/y) in October, including a 2.1% jump (11.5% y/y) in motor vehicles. Inventories excluding autos rose 0.2% (3.6% y/y) in October. Inventories of furniture, electronics and appliances rose 0.4% (-1.5% y/y) while building materials slipped 0.2% (+2.7% y/y).

Euro-Zone Jobs Market Stabilizes

The euro-zone jobs market stabilized in the six months to September, according to employment figures, bringing an end to a long decline in the number of people at work in the 17 countries that use the euro.

The European Union’s statistics agency said that on a seasonally adjusted basis, 145 million people were in work across the currency area during the third quarter, a figure unchanged from the previous period. Eurostat also revised its figures for the second quarter, and now calculates that there was no change in employment levels, having previously estimated there was a 0.1% decline.

In Germany, employment levels were up 0.6% on the same period last year, while in Greece they were down 2.9%. Indeed, seven of the euro zone’s members were still experiencing a decline in employment during the three months to September.

Saudi Arabia Exposes OPEC’s Fissures

(…) As The Wall Street Journal’s crack OPEC team reports, Saudi Arabia has essentially promised to steady markets for the past two years. But now, with pressure growing over a possible output cut to steady markets, the Saudis are signaling they are no longer willing to go it alone. (…)

Riyadh sees no reason why it and it alone should have to shoulder the burden of trimming and this week’s apparent withdrawal from its role as swing producer is the clearest sign yet of its deep concern.

This month’s OPEC meeting in Vienna was, on the face of it, a cut-and-dried affair. For reporters, the focus was on Iran more than the collective, as the decision to stand pat on overall production was widely expected.

But behind closed doors great rifts are opening up, with Saudi and its Gulf neighbors in one camp, Iran in another and Iraq in a third. Each has issues, both oil-related and political, with the others. (…)

House Approves Budget Pact

The House passed a budget bill designed to avoid a government shutdown next month and relax spending limits in the next two years.

The bill passed with a wide bipartisan margin, on a vote of 332-94. Voting for the measure were 169 Republicans and 163 Democrats, while 62 Republicans and 32 Democrats voted against.

Approval of the bill, which is expected to pass the Senate next week, clears the way for a less-glamorous stage of budgeting as lawmakers set out to make line-by-line spending decisions before current funding runs out Jan. 15. (…)

“Elections have consequences,”‘ said Mr. Ryan, who was his party’s 2012 vice-presidential nominee.  (…)

There is no guarantee that the bipartisan deal signals the end of brinkmanship or that this episode of bipartisanship will reach into other areas. The most immediate test will be the next month’s work on appropriations legislation, which must be enacted before Jan. 15.

The agreement sets only the overall spending targets for domestic and defense programs: $1.012 trillion in the current fiscal year, which is more than the $986 billion provided in 2013. Spending this year would have been even lower—$967 billion—had the sequester cuts taken effect. Under the deal, it would increase to $1.014 trillion in the year starting next Oct. 1. (…)

Goldman Sachs Goes Against Consensus in Dollar Call

Goldman Sachs Group Inc.’s Thomas Stolper, who correctly predicted the dollar’s slide against the euro this year, is deviating from the consensus that the greenback will be among the best currencies to own in 2014.

The dollar will weaken through 2014, reaching $1.40 per euro for the first time since October 2011, Goldman’s London-based chief currency strategist said. The mean estimate in a Bloomberg survey of 46 contributors is for a 7 percent rally to $1.28 per euro from $1.3758 today.

 

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