NEW$ & VIEW$ (10 DECEMBER 2013)

Small Businesses Optimism Up Slightly

Owner sentiment increased by 0.9 points to 92.5, a dismal reading as has
been the case since the recovery started. Over half of the improvement was accounted for by the labor market components which is certainly good news, lifting them closer to normal levels. Expected business conditions though deteriorated further – lots of dismal views of the economy coming next year. The Index has stayed in a “trading range” between 86.4 and 95.4 since the recovery started, poor in comparison to an average reading of 100 from 1973 through 2007.

Small business optimism report data through November 2013

The net percent of all owners (seasonally adjusted) reporting higher
nominal sales in the past 3 months compared to the prior 3 months was
unchanged at a negative 8 percent. Fifteen percent still cite weak sales as
their top business problem, but is the lowest reading since June 2008. The
net percent of owners expecting higher real sales volumes rose 1 point to 3 percent of all owners after falling 6 points in October (seasonally adjusted), a weak showing.

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The pace of inventory reduction continued with a seasonally adjusted net
negative 7 percent of all owners reporting growth in inventories, 1 point
worse than in October. The negative outlook for the economy and real
sales prospects adversely impacted inventory satisfaction. The net percent
of owners viewing current stocks as too low improved only 1 point, to
negative 4 percent in November. Inventories are too large, especially given the poor outlook for sales improvements. The net percent of owners
planning to add to inventory stocks was a net 0 percent (up 1 point), no
new orders for inventory when stocks are excessive compared to expected
sales.

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WEEKLY CHAIN STORE SALES SHOW NO HOLIDAY CHEERS

Sales dropped 1.6% last week after the 2.8% decline the previous week. The growth in the 4-week m.a. is 2.2% YoY. It was 3.0% at the same time last year when the Christmas season sales finished up 3.3% by this measure.

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Smile Americans Regain Some Wealth

The net worth of U.S. households and nonprofit organizations—the values of homes, stocks and other assets minus debts and other liabilities—rose 2.6%, or about $1.9 trillion, in the third quarter of 2013 to $77.3 trillion, the highest on record, according to the Federal Reserve.

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The value of stocks and mutual funds owned by households jumped $917 billion last quarter, while the value of residential real estate grew about $428 billion, according to the Fed. (…)

Sad smile Wealthy Go Frugal This Holiday Amid Uneven U.S. Recovery

(…) Coach Inc. has said customers plan to spend less on gifts and that mall traffic fell sharply last month. Analysts predict Nordstrom Inc.’s fourth-quarter sales may grow less than half the year-ago pace of 6.1 percent. Tiffany & Co.’s third-quarter comparable sales in the Americas were barely higher. Even before Black Friday, Saks Inc., Neiman Marcus Group Inc. and Nordstrom offered 40 percent off on many brands. (…)

In early October, Unity Marketing conducted an online survey of 1,200 affluent shoppers. Twenty five percent said they’ll spend less on holiday gifts this year than they did in 2012, while 60 percent said they plan to spend the same. Just 13 percent said they would spend more.

Half the respondents said the financial health of the country is worse now than it was three months ago. (…)

First rise in US mortgage debt since 2008
Consumer spending may support economic growth next year

The US has reached an important milestone in its recovery from the financial crisis after the first rise in outstanding mortgage debt since the beginning of 2008.

After reducing debt for 21 consecutive quarters, US households increased their net mortgage liabilities at an annualised rate of 0.9 per cent in the third quarter of 2013, according to new data from the US Federal Reserve. (…)

Total household credit grew at an annualised pace of 3 per cent, a little slower than the growth of nominal GDP, while credit in the business sector expanded at a pace of 7.5 per cent. (…)

Canada’s top 1% take home 10.6% of its income

A first glimpse of how top earners fared in 2011 shows their share of income peaked in 2006 at 12.1 per cent, before the recession walloped the wealthy as investment income and bonuses dried up. However, the share is still higher than when Statistics Canada began tracking incomes in 1982, when it stood at 7.1 per cent. (…)

In the U.S., the income share of the top 1 per cent of earners was 19.7 per cent in 2011, according to economists Emmanuel Saez and Thomas Piketty. By last year, it had grown to about 22.5 per cent – a similar level to both before the recession and the Great Depression. The economists found that incomes for the top 1 per cent grew by nearly a third between 2009 and 2012, compared with 0.4-per-cent growth for the bottom 99 per cent.

In Canada, the threshold to be in the top percentile of earners rose to $209,600 in 2011, up from $207,300 a year earlier in constant dollars. It requires $108,300 to be part of the top 5 per cent, while it takes $84,100 to be in the top decile of earners.

The rich typically pay a higher share of taxes in Canada, although that share has declined in recent years. The top 1 per cent of earners paid 20.8 per cent of the total share of federal and provincial or territorial income taxes, down from 23.3 per cent five years earlier. (…)

The top 5 per cent of earners in Canada held 23.8 per cent of total income in 2011, while the top 10 per cent received 35.1 per cent. The report is based on 2011 tax-file data, which includes incomes from earnings and investments, but is not a measure of total wealth, which includes assets such as housing.

Signs Investment Slowing in China

(…) retail sales beat expectations, while investment lost momentum, a sign of progress toward the consumption-led growth policy makers have sought. Retail sales posted 13.7% annual growth in November, up from 13.3% in October, and auto sales hit a record high. (…)

Overall investment showed signs of slowing in November, though real-estate sales and construction starts were strong. Fixed-asset investment was up 19.9% in the first 11 months of the year, compared with the same period of 2012, just below expectations and lower than the figure for the January-to-October period. (…)

Growth in industrial production, the most closely watched monthly indicator of economic performance, slipped back to 10% on a year-to-year basis in November from 10.3% the previous month. (…)

Auto  China Auto Sales Gain 16% as Japan Automakers Extend Recovery

China’s passenger-vehicle sales rose 16 percent in November as Japanese automakers extended their recovery in the world’s largest auto market.

Wholesale deliveries of cars, multipurpose and sport utility vehicles climbed to 1.7 million units last month, the state-backed China Association of Automobile Manufacturers said today. (…)

Industrywide, total sales of vehicles — including buses and trucks — reached 19.9 million units this year through November, putting China on course to be the first country to ever see 20 million units in annual vehicle sales. (…)

By contrast, Indian passenger-vehicle sales fell 10 percent last month, the third-straight decline, according to data released by the Society of Indian Automobile Manufacturers today.

Ghost  France’s Industrial Production fell 0.3% in October, following a 0.3% decline in September.

SENTIMENT WATCH

over the past 3 weeks a cumulative ~15B flowed into equity mutual funds while-$17B flowed out of Bond Mutual funds. (ISI)

 

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