NEW$ & VIEW$ (15 NOVEMBER 2013)

Empire State Manufacturing Contracts: General Business Conditions Lowest Since January

The general business conditions index fell four points to -2.2, its first negative reading since May. The new orders index also entered negative territory, falling thirteen points to -5.5, and the shipments index moved below zero with a fourteen-point drop to -0.5. The prices paid index fell five points to 17.1, indicating a slowing of input price increases. The prices received index fell to -4.0; the negative reading was a sign that selling prices had declined—their first retreat in two years. Labor market conditions were also weak, with the index for number of employees falling four points to 0.0, while the average workweek index dropped to -5.3.

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Shoppers Can’t Shake the Blues

 

Wal-Mart Stores Inc. offered little reason for holiday cheer, reporting its third straight quarter of poor sales in the U.S. and painting a gloomy picture for the economic recovery.

The downbeat outlook from the world’s largest retailer was a reminder that even as U.S. stock prices climb to record heights, many Americans remain caught between high joblessness and hits to their paychecks that are limiting their ability to spend, putting a further drag on an already sluggish economy.

Kohl’s Corp., a department-store chain that caters to middle-income customers, also reported weak results Thursday and said it scaled back its inventories ahead of the holidays, signaling a lack of confidence in its ability to boost sales. (…)

Wal-Mart lowered its full-year profit forecast on Thursday and warned sales would be flat through the end of January, after sales fell for a third straight quarter at U.S. stores open at least a year. (…)

Even higher-end retailers experienced softness in the third quarter. Nordstrom Inc. reported late Thursday that its profit fell to $137 million from $146 million a year earlier, as sales at stores open at least a year slipped 0.7%. The company attributed part of the decline to a shift in the timing of its big Anniversary Sale, but also saw some weakness.

“We’ve experienced softness in our full line store sales with third quarter results consistent with recent trends but lower than what we anticipated as we started the year,” Blake Nordstrom, the company’s president said on a conference call with analysts. (…)

On Wednesday, Macy’s Inc. delivered strong sales and an upbeat holiday outlook that sent its stock up more than 9%. But the department-store chain is boosting discounts to draw in shoppers even at the expense of profit margins.

Kohl’s said it plans to ratchet up holiday marketing and discounts to bring more people into its stores after it cut its full-year profit outlook Thursday. The department-store chain reported its third-quarter earnings fell 18% as comparable-store sales dropped 1.6%. (…)

The Bentonville, Ark., retailer could face additional pressure on sales from the expiration of a temporary boost in food-stamp benefits. The expiration on Nov. 1 is expected to leave nearly 48 million Americans with $5 billion less to spend this fiscal year, which ends in September, according to the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities. The hit follows the end of a payroll tax break that had saved 2% of consumers’ monthly paychecks.

Wal-Mart estimates it rakes in about 18% of total U.S. outlays on food stamps, or about $14 billion of the $80 billion the U.S. Department of Agriculture says was appropriated for food stamps in the year ended in September 2012. (…)

“A reduction in gas prices and grocery deflation will help customers stretch their budgets, but they’re still trying to absorb a 2% payroll tax cut, uncertainty over Washington, and a lack of clarity around personal health care costs that are all headwinds,” Mr. Simon said. (…)

U.S. Worker Productivity Climbs

More productive U.S. workers supported faster economic growth in the third quarter, but slower business investment might limit future gains.

Labor productivity, or output per hours worked, increased at a 1.9% annual rate from July through September, the Labor Department said Thursday.

Second-quarter productivity growth was revised down to a 1.8% pace from a previous reading of 2.3%. Productivity held flat from a year ago because the increase in output was matched by an increase in hours worked.

Meanwhile, unit labor costs, a key gauge of inflationary pressure, declined at a 0.6% annual pace last quarter. From a year earlier, unit labor costs are up 1.9%—running ahead of the increase in consumer prices.

Industrial Output Runs Hard to Stay in Place

Industrial production in September returned to where it was before the recession, based on a Fed index. But certain index components are way above or below that level, providing a telling set of statistics about today’s economy.

September’s industrial-production data, which cover the period just before the government shutdown, seemed encouraging at first glance. The index expanded 0.6% over the prior month, well ahead of predictions and the fastest pace in seven months. But the strength lay entirely in utilities output, which makes up a 10th of the index. The sixth-warmest September on record for the contiguous 48 states followed a summer that was milder than the year-ago period. Actual manufacturing production, which comprises three-quarters of the index, rose by just 0.1%.

U.S. Trade Gap Widens as Exports Slip

The U.S. trade deficit widened 8%, as a fall in U.S. exports in September suggests the global economy is struggling to gain traction quickly enough to offset tepid demand at home. (Chart from Haver Analytics)

Exports fell 0.2% while imports rose 1.2%, causing the trade gap to expand for the third-straight month.

The report suggests exports, after rising earlier in the year, slumped during the summer as demand weakened in Europe, Japan and developing economies. The three-month moving average of exports, a reading of the underlying trend, slipped for the first time since May. (…)

U.S. exports to the EU from January through September fell 2.7%, compared with the same period a year earlier. Exports to the U.K. were down 15.1%, and exports to Germany fell by 4.5%.

The European Union accounts for roughly 17% of the market for U.S. exports.

The U.S. is also seeing lower demand from Japan, whose export-driven economy is struggling amid weak overseas demand. U.S. exports to Japan this year through September were down 7.6% compared to a year earlier.

September’s drop in overall exports was broad-based, with falling demand for American industrial materials as well as consumer and capital goods.

U.S.: Downward revisions to Q3 GDP?

The US goods and services trade deficit widened unexpectedly in September to US$41.8 bn, the worst tally in four months. The deterioration was due to rising imports and declining exports, the latter falling for a third month in a row in real terms. The results are worse than what the BEA had anticipated when it estimated Q3 GDP last week.

As today’s Hot Charts show, the agency estimated a less brutal deterioration in net exports of goods than what actually transpired. And with real exports of goods growing in Q3 at about a third of the pace estimated by the BEA, and real imports of goods growing faster in the quarter than what the agency had anticipated, it seems that trade may
have been a drag on the economy in Q3 rather than a contributor as depicted in last week’s GDP report.

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We now expect a three-tick downgrade to Q3 US GDP growth from 2.8% to 2.5% annualized. Unfortunately, the bad news doesn’t end there. September’s weak trade results are also bad for the current quarter. The higher imports probably mean that the Q3 stock build-up was larger than first thought, meaning that there’s perhaps a higher likelihood of
an inventory drawdown (and hence a moderation in production) in the current quarter. If that’s the case, Q4 US GDP growth could be running only at around 1% annualized. (NBF)

Consumer Borrowing Picks Up

Americans stepped up their borrowing in the third quarter, a trend that could boost the economy—but, in a worrying sign, the nation’s student-loan tab also rose.

Household debt outstanding, which includes mortgages, credit cards, auto loans and student loans, rose $127 billion between July and September to $11.28 trillion, the first increase since late last year and the biggest in more than five years, Federal Reserve Bank of New York figures showed Thursday.

Taking on Debt Again

Mortgage balances, the biggest part of household debt, increased by $56 billion amid fewer foreclosures, while Americans bumped up their auto-loan balances by $31 billion.

At the same time, the amount of education loans outstanding, which has increased every quarter since the New York Fed began tracking these figures in 2003, rose $33 billion to surpass $1 trillion for the first time, according to this measure. The share of student-loan balances that were 90 or more days overdue rose to 11.8% from 10.9%, even as late payments on other debts dropped.

Yellen Defends Fed’s Role, Current Path

Federal Reserve Vice Chairwoman Janet Yellen signaled Thursday that no big changes would come to the central bank under her leadership if she becomes its next chief.

The nominee said at the hearing that the decision about winding down the program depended on how the economy performs. “We have seen meaningful progress in the labor market,” Ms. Yellen said. “What the [Fed] is looking for is signs that we will have growth that’s strong enough to promote continued progress.”

She also repeated the Fed’s message that even after the bond program ends, it will keep short-term interest rates near zero for a long time because the bank doesn’t want to remove its support too fast.

The Fed’s next meeting is Dec. 17-18.

Surprised smile  Cisco CEO: ‘Never Seen’ Such a Falloff in Orders

imageThe Silicon Valley network-equipment giant on Wednesday said revenue rose just 1.8% in its first fiscal quarter, compared with its projection of 3% to 5% growth. Cisco followed up by projecting a decline of 8% to 10% in the current period, an unusually grim forecast for a company seen as a bellwether for corporate technology spending.

John Chambers, Cisco’s chief executive, said orders the company expected to land in October never materialized, particularly in Brazil, Russia, Mexico, India and China. Orders for all emerging markets declined 21%.

“I’ve never seen this before,” Mr. Chambers said.

First-quarter orders in China declined 18%, the company said, with Mexico and India off by the same percentage. Orders were off 30% in Russia and 25% in Brazil.

Euro Zone’s Rebound Feels Like Recession

(…) Gross domestic product in the 17-country euro zone grew only 0.1% last quarter, or 0.4% at an annualized rate, data published on Thursday showed. The rate of growth was down sharply from the second quarter, when policy makers and economists began to hope that the clouds were clearing for the troubled currency bloc. (…)

Even Germany’s economy grew only 0.3% last quarter, or 1.3% annualized, as weak demand in Europe and patchy global growth hit its exports. (…) France and Italy, the bloc’s next-biggest economies after Germany, both suffered small contractions.

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Industrial production down by 0.5% in euro area

IP in the Euro 17 area was down 0.5% MoM in September and for Q3 as a whole. IP of durable consumer goods were –2.6% MoM in September and –4.1% QoQ in Q3.

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EU Inflation Slows to Four-Year Low

The EU’s official statistics agency said Friday consumer prices rose 0.9% in the 12 months to October, a lower annual rate of inflation than the 1.3% recorded in September, and the lowest since October 2009.

Eurostat also confirmed that the annual rate of inflation in the 17 countries that share the euro was 0.7% in October, the lowest level since November 2009.

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Core inflation was +0.8% in October, down from 1.0% in September.

 

Brussels warns Spain and Italy on budgets

France’s ‘limited progress’ on reforms also under spotlight

Brussels has warned Spain and Italy that their budget plans for 2014 may not comply with the EU’s tough new debt and deficit rules, a move that could force both countries to revise their tax and spending programmes before resubmitting them to national parliaments.

The verdicts, the first time the European Commission has issued detailed evaluations of eurozone government budgets, also include a warning to France that its economic reform plan constitutes only “limited progress” towards reforming its slow-growing economy.

Earnings Season Ends

The third quarter earnings season came to an end today now that Wal-Mart (WMT) has released its numbers.  Of the 2,268 companies that reported this season, which started in early October, 58.6% beat earnings estimates.  Below is a chart comparing this quarter’s beat rate to past quarters since 2001.  Since the bull market began in March 2009, this is the second worst earnings beat rate we’ve seen.  Only Q1 of this year was worse. 

(…) the 8-quarter streak of more companies lowering guidance than raising guidance was extended to nine quarters this season, as companies lowering guidance outnumbered companies raising guidance by 4.5 percentage points.  When will companies finally offer up positive outlooks on the future?

China to Ease One-Child Policy

Xinhua said authorities will now allow couples to have two children if one of the parents is an only child. Currently, couples are restricted to one child except in some areas.

Morning MoneyBeat: Nasdaq Nears 4000

The Nasdaq Composite is poised to cross 4000 for the first time in 13 years, an event that is sure to prompt comparisons to the dot-com bubble. It shouldn’t.

(…) The Nasdaq is now dominated by mostly profitable companies. Names such as Pets.com have come and gone, replaced by more mature companies, plenty of which sit on loads of cash and pay hefty dividends. Apple Inc,, Microsoft Corp. and Cisco Systems Inc. are bigger and return much more cash to shareholders now than they did during the go-go days. The index also trades at a far cheaper multiple than it did 14 years ago.

Light bulb  Berkshire Reports New Stake in Exxon Mobil

Warren Buffett’s Berkshire Hathaway disclosed it had picked up a $3.45 billion stake in Exxon Mobil, a sizable new addition to its roughly $107 billion portfolio of stocks.

The stock was likely picked by Mr. Buffett himself, given the size of the investment.

 

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